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[UPDATE] Framing Memory in Late Medieval English Narrative - MLA 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, February 4, 2014 - 11:17am
full name / name of organization: 
Jeff Stoyanoff / Duquesne University
contact email: 

Proposed special session - MLA 2015. How do late medieval English narratives frame cultural memory? From the great famines at the beginning of the fourteenth century to the ongoing Hundred Years War, the twilight of the Middle Ages in England contains many memorable events itself, yet poets and writers during this period also draw on a fantasized English past - Arthurian legend - and the common trope of translatio imperii. Additionally, authors cite the authority of past auctors (authorities) to validate their own work. As Larry Scanlon has noted, "Authority, then, is an enabling past reproduced in the present" (Narrative, Authority, and Power 38).

Philamet Issue 20 - Humour CFP

updated: 
Monday, February 3, 2014 - 10:20pm
full name / name of organization: 
Philament, Thue University of Sydney Journal of the Arts
contact email: 

Philament, the peer-reviewed online journal of the arts and culture that is affiliated with the University of Sydney, invites postgraduate students and early-career scholars to submit academic papers and creative works for a forthcoming issue on the theme of humour. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
- Humour and identity
- Laughter
- Humour and music
- Satire
- Parody
- Humour and politics
- Psychology of humour
- Humour in the humanities
- Humour and truthfulness
- Black humour
- Cultural humour
- Irony and sincerity
- Humour and emotions
- Forms of humour
- Humour and feminism

Transformations - 30 May 2014

updated: 
Monday, February 3, 2014 - 6:00pm
full name / name of organization: 
University College London

This year's UCL English Department Graduate Conference seeks to explore the nature of transformation and the many possible meanings this can hold for the wide diaspora of text production and consumption. Over the past century the study of English literature has undergone vast transformations, prompting academics and writers to re-evaluate the concept of the 'canon', examine practices of reading, and consider the cultural impact of texts and criticism. We invite students across periods and disciplines to explore the theme of 'transformations'.

Graduate-Undergraduate Colloquium: TRANSFORMATIONS - May 10, 2014

updated: 
Monday, February 3, 2014 - 2:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
Portland State University
contact email: 

CALL FOR PAPERS
World Languages and Literatures
Graduate Student Colloquium
May 10, 2014
TRANSFORMATIONS
Current trends in Literature, Linguistics, Language Pedagogy and Cultural Studies
EXTENDED DEADLINE: February 24th

[UPDATE] Fifth Annual Literatures and Linguistics Undergraduate Colloquium

updated: 
Monday, February 3, 2014 - 1:59pm
full name / name of organization: 
Gordon College
contact email: 

The submission deadline for the Fifth Annual Literatures and Linguistics Colloquium has been extended to February 15, 2014.

The Department of English Language and Literature and the Department of Languages and Linguistics at Gordon College invite paper submissions for the Fifth Annual LLUC taking place on March 29, 2014. Undergraduate students from all colleges and universities are encouraged to submit 8-10 page papers in English on any linguistic or literary topic. Please provide a 100-200 word summary (abstract) of your essay in addition to your completed paper. Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes.

Framing Memory in Late Medieval English Narrative

updated: 
Sunday, February 2, 2014 - 3:09pm
full name / name of organization: 
Duquesne University
contact email: 

How do late medieval English narratives frame cultural memory? From the great famines at the beginning of the fourteenth century to the ongoing Hundred Years War, the twilight of the Middle Ages in England contains many memorable events itself, yet poets and writers during this period also draw on a fantasized English past - Arthurian legend - and the common trope of translatio imperii. Additionally, authors cite the authority of past auctors (authorities) to validate their own work. As Larry Scanlon has noted, "Authority, then, is an enabling past reproduced in the present" (Narrative, Authority, and Power 38).

Searching for Place: Interpretations of the Environment and Landscape

updated: 
Sunday, February 2, 2014 - 2:17pm
full name / name of organization: 
University of Wyoming
contact email: 

"It will soon be apparent that even though we gather together and look in the same directions at the same instant, we will not – we cannot – see the same landscape" (Meinig 33). D.W. Meinig's explanation of landscape perceptions demonstrates that a single interpretation of a landscape or environment fails to accommodate the subjective experiences of any group, regardless of the size. For example, Edward Abbey's response to the commodification of a river through damming establishes his view as conflicting with that of developers.

"Early Ecocriticism: Environments in Medieval and Early Modern Literature," 68th RMMLA Convention, Boise, ID (Oct. 9-11, 2014)

updated: 
Saturday, February 1, 2014 - 9:03pm
full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Peter Remien / Rocky Mountain MLA
contact email: 

This session seeks papers for the 68th annual Rocky Mountain MLA conference in Boise, Idaho (Oct. 9-11, 2014) that utilize the critical lens of ecocriticism, the interdisciplinary study of literature and the environment, to explore any aspect of medieval or early modern literature. When ecocriticism emerged in the 1990s as a response to awareness of impending environmental crises, its primary focus was on literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. More recently, however, scholars like Ken Hiltner, Sylvia Bowerbank, Diane McColley, and Gillian Rudd have called attention to how earlier works of literature register and respond to the environmental problems of their own periods.

Mediation and Conjunction: The Restless Middle [April 1, 2014]

updated: 
Saturday, February 1, 2014 - 1:05pm
full name / name of organization: 
Humanities Review-St John's University

The Humanities Review seeks to analyze the ways in which disparate dialectical poles (such as Nature and Culture) are mediated, and in which disparate fields of knowledge conjoin.

To this end, we are seeking scholarly articles that examine the way supposed distinctions are constructed and maintained between authentically linked, contiguous, or identical concepts; the consequences of such distinctions; and the implications of their removal.

In a similar and related vein, we are interested in cross-pollination between academic fields which are capable of illuminating both the strengths and oversights of one or both disciplines and shedding new light on new or stagnating issues.

[UPDATE] Extended deadline [Feb 28] Supernatural Creatures: from Elf-Shot to Shrek

updated: 
Saturday, February 1, 2014 - 7:18am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Lodz, Poland

The conference aims to bring together experts in folklore, medieval and early modern literature and culture as well as contemporary fantasy and science-fiction to explore the fascinating relationship between supernatural creatures and humankind.

We would like to invite contributions that address the nature and function of the beliefs of past eras, their postmodern transformations, and especially those which trace the (dis)continuities in the ways in which these creatures have been imagined and perceived over the ages. From medieval fairies through Tinker Bell to Orlando Bloom's Legolas, from Fafnir to Glaurung or Smaug, the conference aims to investigate the nature of the undying fascination with the supernatural denizens of our (?) world.

ANGLICA: An International Journal of English Studies

updated: 
Friday, January 31, 2014 - 1:03pm
full name / name of organization: 
Institute of English Studies, University of Warsaw
contact email: 

The editors of Anglica: An International Journal of English Studies, a peer-reviewed annual print journal published by the Institute of English Studies, University of Warsaw, invite submissions for Volume 23 on all aspects of English literature, culture and linguistics. The suggested maximum length of the paper is 12 pages (27000 characters with spaces) including the reference section and notes. We recommend the MLA style guide (7th edition). The article should be preceded by an abstract of approximately 100 words. Authors are also asked to provide a short biographical note, approximately 50 words.
The deadline for contributions is 30 April 2014.

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