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Consequences of "the Fall": Growth and Decline in Medieval and Early Modern Literary Culture; April 10-11, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, December 18, 2014 - 1:41pm
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -- English Department

Consequences of "the Fall": Growth and Decline in Medieval and Early Modern Literary Culture

Very few aspects of late medieval and early modern literature and culture remain untouched by the Fall, concepts of original sin, and considerations of man's place in a postlapsarian world. Concerns over the state of the soul, right governance and maintenance of the commonweal, and engagement with the natural world were shaded by a need to recoup the loss incurred by the expulsion from Eden.

Fallen Animals: an interdisciplinary perspective 19th-20th March 2015, University of Aberdeen, Scotland

updated: 
Thursday, December 18, 2014 - 11:31am
Zohar Hadromi-Allouche and Aina Larkin, University of Aberdeen

Following the success of the Fall Narratives project in 2014, this workshop will explore the theme of fallen animals. The serpent in the Garden of Eden is but one example of the ambivalence which has characterized the human-animal relationship over the centuries, both across, and within, cultures, societies and traditions. With publications such as Anat Pick's Creaturely Poetics (2011), the field of post-anthropocentrism studies has in recent years become particularly vibrant and attracts scholarly attention from a variety of disciplines. We welcome proposals with research interest in fields such as, but not limited to, literature, religion, languages, history, philosophy, psychology, art, film and visual culture, cultural studies and economics.

Subjectivity in an Object World

updated: 
Wednesday, December 17, 2014 - 10:07am
St. John’s University Humanities Review (Vol. Thirteen, Issue 1/Spring 2015)

Publication: St. John's University Humanities Review (Vol. Thirteen, Issue 1/Spring 2015)

"The chief defect of humanism is that it concerns human beings. Between humanism and something else, it might be possible to create an acceptable fiction."
-Wallace Stevens

Changes in Fashion in the Middle Ages - Abstracts due Feb. 2, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, December 16, 2014 - 1:39am
UC Santa Barbara Medieval Studies Program

University of California, Santa Barbara

Center for Medieval Studies Graduate Student Conference

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

Call for Papers: "Changes in Fashion in the Middle Ages"

Keynote Speaker: Professor Maureen C. Miller, Department of History, UC Berkeley

"ché l'uso d'i mortali è come fronda

in ramo, che sen va e altra vene."

"The custom of men is as leaves on a branch,

some of which go and others come."

Dante Aligheri, Paradiso, XXVI, 137-138

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