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Cluster of Essays on Personification

updated: 
Wednesday, July 5, 2017 - 2:34pm
Yearbook of Langland Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 1, 2018

The editors of the Yearbook of Langland Studies invite submissions to a cluster on personification for YLS 33 (2019). In keeping with the journal’s broad interpretation of the scope of Langland Studies, we invite notes and essays which approach the topic from any angle, and which investigate either Piers Plowman itself or texts that are in some way relevant to or contiguous with its tradition. Submissions are due to yls.submissions@gmail.com by June 1, 2018. Please contact the journal with any questions.

Redefining Nation and Nationalism: A post-nineteenth century approach for a modern Medieval Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, July 4, 2017 - 5:37pm
International Congress on Medieval Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 10, 2017

The problematic use of ideas established in nineteenth century, using medieval literature and culture, to define nascent senses of nationalism lingers over the field of Medieval Studies. The nineteenth century saw the construction of Western European national identity using, for example, texts such as the Chanson de Roland, the Nibelungenleid, and the works of Thomas Malory. However, the biography of the French national hero Charlemagne was written by the German Einhard; the German national epic is about a group of Burgundians; and King Arthur has equal ties to his Celtic and French development as he does to his Englishness.

53rd ICMS Kalamazoo: The Saints in Icelandic Sagas and Poetry after 1550

updated: 
Monday, July 3, 2017 - 9:47am
Daniel C. Najork
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, Michigan), May 10-13

The Saints in Icelandic Sagas and Poetry after 1550

Organizer: Daniel C. Najork

 

Call for Papers - Romanian Review of Eurasian Studies

updated: 
Monday, July 3, 2017 - 9:47am
Eurasian Studies Center/"Ovidius" University of Constanta, Faculty of History and Political Sciences, Romania
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Call for Papers - Romanian Review of Eurasian Studies

 Romanian Review of Eurasian Studies, year XIII, No. 1-2 /2017 invites professors, researchers and Ph.D. students to submit their research articles and reviews for publication until 15 September 2017.

 Our journal is indexed in ERIH PLUS, ProQuest, EBSCO, CEEOL and Index Copernicus databases.

The RES Essay Prize 2017: Final call for entries

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:13am
The Review of English Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

The RES Essay Prize aims to encourage scholarship amongst postgraduate research students in Britain and abroad. The essay can be on any topic of English literature or the English language from the earliest period to the present.

 

The competition is open to anyone studying for a higher degree, or who completed one no earlier than January 2015

 

The winner will receive:

  • Publication of the winning essay in the June 2017 issue of The Review of English Studies
  • £500 worth of OUP books
  • A free year's subscription to The Review of English Studies

*How to enter*

Medieval History and Marxist Thought

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:13am
53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

CFP: 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies

Session Title: “Medieval History and Marxist Thought”

Session Organizer: Luke Fidler (Department of Art History, University of Chicago)

 

CFP Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives (9/15/17; Kalamazoo 5/10-13/18)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:07am
Michael A Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Past, Present, Future: Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives
Sponsored by The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan
10-13 May 2018
Proposals due by 15 September 2017

Kalamazoo 2018: History and Poetics (with Suzanne Akbari)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:06am
Harvard English Dept. Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

This panel focuses on medieval conceptions of time, history, and memory. As literary historians, we frequently encounter the challenges of periodization: how to establish the autonomous significance of the Middle Ages, as well as think beyond the limits of stage-oriented historiography. Yet how did medieval chroniclers, poets, artists, and travellers view the historical process and their place within it? What “pasts” did they recover, and what forms of representation were used to remember, rehearse or reimagine them? Are there distinctions drawn between history and memory—between notionally universal, stable, and textual forms of record, and personal, bodily, and mutable ones?

Kalamazoo 2018: Literary Personae, Translating Identity (with Leslie Lockett)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:06am
Harvard English Dept. Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Literary personae often operate as sites of negotiation between historical identity and literary or intellectual-historical traditions. Personae such as the didactic interlocutor, the dreamer, the lamenting lyric speaker, or the scop reoccur in certain medieval genres; these figures, however, are also often marked by particular cultural or biographical features, differentiating them from others in the tradition. This panel welcomes papers that discuss literary personae in Anglo-Saxon England from any angle, but which might respond to one or several of the following questions. What types of performance are involved in the assumption of literary personae?

“Staging Knowledge in Early English Drama” Kalamazoo 2018

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:28pm
Joe Stadolnik and Helen Cushman
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

In late-medieval England, public performances of learning and expertise were political performances, that not only expressed one’s mastery of a subject but also an ability and right to speak to it in public view. Whether speaking to knowledge of theology, or medicine, or carpentry, these public professions of knowledge were subject to scrutiny both institutional (e.g. the Church or craft guilds) and informal (by lay churchgoers or prospective customers). Drama offered a form in which claims to knowledge could be exaggerated, parodied, or reproduced for effect--in a word, staged--to invite medieval audiences to rethink the social and political dimensions to such performances.

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