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Lydgate's Little Library @ ICMS 2020

updated: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 1:54pm
Lydgate Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

A full 43% of Lydgate’s works in the DIMEV have no print or online editions. Rather than situating Lydgate in relation to his “big works” that have (sometimes multiple) editions – “Siege of Thebes,” “Troy Book,” and “Fall of Princes” – we should take our cue from Thomas Warton, who in 1840 wrote that “to enumerate Lydgate’s pieces, would be to write the catalogue of a little library.” We invite proposals addressing “Lydgate’s Little Library” – those pieces that demonstrate his “versatility of talents” (to quote Warton) and do not get the scholarly or pedagogical attention that his larger works do.

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Proverbs and Wisdom

updated: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 11:50am
Early Proverb Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 13, 2019

The Early Proverb Society emphasizes the functions of that mobile, morphic form, the proverb.  EPS showcases our readings at a round table (three to four discussants and one respondent) and a panel of papers (three speakers) at the 55th Congress, May 7-10, 2020.  All methodological approaches are welcomed warmly.

Round table:  Medieval Proverbs:  Exchanges, Clashes, and Transactions

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Middle Grounds: The Politics and Aesthetics of Medieval Mediocrity

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 7:16pm
International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo; May 7-10, 2020. Medievalists @ Penn Sponsored Session.
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

What can we learn from unexceptional texts and artifacts in the Middle Ages? How can we critically assess the metrics by which we evaluate quality? How can medieval studies reconcile, or recover from, the history of Orientalism in its estimation of non-European medieval traditions? This panel builds on conversations during the 2019 Medievalists @ Penn Conference on Mediocrity (https://middling-ages.tumblr.com), which we seek to carry in more explicitly transcultural directions.

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Playing with Game Theory

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:57am
Game Cultures Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

The Games Culture Society showcases the importance of games —and their various manifestations — in medieval culture. Importantly, the theoretical implications of games extends beyond the temporal and spatial borders of the game space itself into larger aesthetic, ethical, cultural, and social arenas. The GCS serves to highlight the importance and multivalent purpose of games in medieval culture as a way to understand better their function in society both then and now. We are pleased to announce the following Calls For Papers for the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo, May 7 – 10, 2020:

Translating Back: Vernacular Sources and Prestige-Language Adaptations

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 4:41am
Marian Homans-Turnbull & Alexandra Reider
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Building on a great conversation at Kalamazoo this spring, Marian Homans-Turnbull and Alexandra Reider are organizing a panel on medieval translation and multilingualism for the International Medieval Congress to be held in Leeds, UK, on 6-9 July We welcome submissions on any medieval language(s), and we're especially eager for submissions on non-English languages this year! Translating Back: Vernacular Sources and Prestige-Language Adaptations Multilingual cultures develop complex practices—and theories—of translation.

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Reimagining “The Middle Ages”

updated: 
Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 9:13am
Medieval Association of the Pacific
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

“The Middle Ages” are created and maintained by those who imagine them today, lending urgency to the project of narrating a global medieval that resists the field’s racist and nationalist myths. Given a need for new imaginaries:

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Medieval Representations of Scholarly Labor

updated: 
Monday, August 5, 2019 - 12:06pm
Program in Medieval Studies at Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

From the Codex Amiatinus’s depiction of Ezra writing in a book to that of Hildegard of Bingen receiving and dictating her supernatural visions in the frontispiece to the Scivias, interest in representing the labors of scholars spanned the length of the Middle Ages. Not only do depictions of scholarly labor such as these, whether visual or textual, shed light onto the material culture and historical practices of medieval scholarship, but they also reveal the ways in which medieval artists and writers sought to convey ideas about the work that they themselves performed and the functions they served in society.

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Migration, Exile, Displacement (roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 5, 2019 - 12:06pm
Program in Medieval Studies at Yale
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Medieval refugees’ stories can be difficult to access, but our own encounters with contemporary refugee crises may hint at the disruption that accompanied mass displacement in the Middle Ages. As millions across the globe continue to be uprooted, what can we learn about the experience of displacement in the medieval world? Persecution, war, plague, poverty, and other factors all contributed to forced migration and exile, as seen in the expulsions of Jews from England and France; the expulsion of Andalusi Muslims during Spain’s Reconquista; displacements caused by the Mongol invasions; and in the migration of peoples escaping the Black Death.

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Violating Sacred Space

updated: 
Monday, August 5, 2019 - 12:06pm
Program in Medieval Studies at Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Sacred space is, in part, defined by its possible violation, examples of which abound in the Middle Ages. The martyrdom of Saint Nicaise, killed in his church by Vandals, is preserved in narrative and art. In Bokenham’s “Life of Saint Margaret,” the saint complains that her relics have been abandoned in churches destroyed by conflict and neglect. Legal sources also betray anxiety about the instability of sacred space: several sources note that damaging church property was an excommunicable sin, while Gratian’s decretals dictate the reconsecration of churches desecrated by bodily fluids.

Deadline Extended SHARP @ RSA 2020

updated: 
Monday, August 5, 2019 - 11:33am
Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 12, 2019

Call for Papers: SHARP @ RSA 2020

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four panels at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Philadelphia, PA on 2-4 April, 2020. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation. We plan to sponsor at least two panels under the banner “New Voices in Book History,” so we welcome applications from participants new to RSA or SHARP, especially early career researchers.

World-Building: Tolkien, His Precursors and Legacies

updated: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019 - 11:25am
Fantasy Research Hub, School of Critical Studies, Univ. of Glasgow
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Call for Papers:"Medieval World-Building: Tolkien, His Precursors and Legacies”

sponsored by the Fantasy Research Hub, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow,

55th International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 7-10, 2020) Kalamazoo, Michigan

 

Race in Early Performance

updated: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019 - 11:13am
Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS: After ‘Emancipation’: The legacies, afterlives and continuation of slavery.

updated: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 9:45am
Institute for the Study of Slavery
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

After ‘Emancipation’: The legacies, afterlives and continuation of slavery.

University of Nottingham, 21-23 June 2020.

The University of Nottingham’s Institute for the Study of Slavery (ISOS) is a multidisciplinary centre which pursues research on both historical and contemporary slavery and forced labour in all parts of the globe and through all periods.

Eco-Entanglements, c. 920-2020: Ruins, Graftings, Stratification

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 5:31pm
Kinney Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

Kinney Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst, February 22, 2020

What are the ecological affordances of thinking with the medieval and early modern past? How can the environmental humanities inspire eco-mimetic modes of thinking and writing? This think-tank conference invites research-in-progress that parses the entanglements of nature and culture, the human and the nonhuman, the material and the metaphysical, to explore how medieval and early modern ecocritical scholarship might speak directly to contemporary political and social concerns.

The conference will include three panels, grouped thematically according to distinct modes of ecological entanglement:

CFP: “Reassessing the Matter of the Greenwood,” Sponsored Session of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies, ICMS, Kalamazoo, May 7-10, 2020

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 3:03pm
Alexander L. Kaufman / International Association for Robin Hood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

“Reassessing the Matter of the Greenwood”

Sponsored Session of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS)

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 7-10, 2020

CFP: "Bad" Food in the Middle Ages (A Roundtable) ICMS, Kalamazoo, May 7-10 2020

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 3:03pm
Alexander L. Kaufman / Medieval Association of the Midwest
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

“Bad” Food in the Middle Ages (A Roundtable)

Sponsored Session of the Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 7-10, 2020

Gender in Global Medieval Mysticism

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 3:00pm
Ashoka University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Gender in Global Medieval Mysticism

March 20-21, 2020

Ashoka University, Sonipat, Haryana, India

Keynote speakers:

Professor Liz Herbert McAvoy, Swansea University

Professor Sa'diyya Shaikh, University of Cape Town

Hiberno-Latin Studies at ICMS Kalamazoo 2020

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:52pm
Brian Cook
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

The panal orgnaizers invite proposals for twenty-minute papers on any topic related to Hiberno-Latin literature and studies.

The Status of Medievalist Film Studies (A Roundtable) at ICMS Kalamazoo 2020

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:48pm
International Society for the Study of Medievalism
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 7, 2019

As medievalism has made its way into mainstream medieval studies, and the teaching of medievalist film alongside medieval texts has become commonplace, what new opportunities and challenges do scholars of medievalist film studies face? These shifts have prompted heated debates in recent years on the values and dangers of teaching Game of Thrones in medieval studies classes, the inadequate framing of medievalist films as adaptations in literature classes and as fiction in history classes, and the formal differences between cinematic and written texts. This roundtable seeks short presentations that address some aspect of this development in scholarship and teaching.

Nineteenth-/Twentieth-/Twenty-First-Century Medievalisms

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Daniel C. Najork; Robert Sirabian
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

For this session, we seek proposals exploring the factors shaping nineteenth- and twentieth-/twenty-first-century literature (in its broad sense) about the Middle Ages as well as the differences in approaches to the Middle Ages in each century. What historical, social, and intellectual views shaped nineteenth-century approaches to the Middle Ages? In what ways were these views limited or biased based on what the Victorians knew and believed and did not know, particularly when compared to advances in historical, psychological, and political knowledge in the next centuries? Conversely, what shaped twentieth-/twenty-first-century views of the Middle Ages?

Studies in Old Norse-Icelandic Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Daniel C. Najork
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Despite the fact that, as Jonas Wellendorf has recently pointed out, “students of Old Norse literature and literary culture have long been aware that hagiographical and ecclesiastical literature has a longer written history in the North than the native saga genres,” (The Routledge Research Companion to the Medieval Icelandic Sagas, 48)there is still, generally, an imbalance in the critical studies of Old Norse-Icelandic hagiography in comparison to studies of the konungasögur and Íslendigasögur.

Jerusalem the Holy city

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:39pm
Stanford Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

CFP: Jerusalem the Holy City

 

The Stanford University Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS) is pleased to announce that we will sponsor three sessions at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 7-10, 2020). Among these are two linked panel sessions entitled “Jerusalem: The Holy City.” The first considers medieval imaginings of a distant Jerusalem across textual, visual, and material culture, while the second considers Jerusalem as an interreligious experience among Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

 

Environmental Violence

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:30pm
Elizabeth S. Leet, Franklin & Marshall College
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Environmental Violence

IMC Kalamazoo (May 7-10, 2020)

Organizer: Elizabeth S. Leet (eleet@fandm.edu)

Much early ecocriticism focused on natural spaces as complements to human agency. For example, studies of the hortus conclusus in medieval romance emblematize this view of nature as a fecund space mastered by humans. In our time of climate crisis, however, ecocritics seek to complicate anthropocentric views of medieval environments. By studying climates and environments that reject human dominion and endanger human lives, we may examine the violence these environments enact and evaluate the models they offer for human survival and care amidst climate disaster.

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