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Diglossia, Heteroglossia, and Raciolinguistics

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 10:44am
MLA 2022 - CLCS-Medieval Forum
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

People form new grammars and dialects through creative languaging: creolization, code-switching, etc. The results carry markers of intercultural relations and historical tensions. How do raciolinguistics manifest in Medieval literature, Medieval reiterations, and historiography?Languages have a deep capacity to coexist, disrupt, and change, and they survive each cultural encounter either strengthened or weakened, but certainly transmogrified. Language’s abilities to form new grammars and dialects through creative formations is apparent in both Medieval texts and in Medieval reiterations.

Resilience, Resistance and Renewal in the Medieval and Early Modern World

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 10:44am
UCLA Medieval and Early Modern Graduate Student Association (MEMSA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 1, 2021

The global medieval and early modern world (broadly considered, c. 900-1750) underwent myriad profound changes, from devastating famines, plagues, and wars to an increased entanglement of the continents, economic transformations, and technological and scientific developments. These changes were often accompanied by calls for the reshaping of the institutions and structures – political, religious, intellectual, etc. – which undergirded societies’ approach to these challenges, encompassing such responses as resistance, resilience, and renewal. 

The White Rose Medieval Graduate Conference: Self & Selves

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 10:43am
Centre for Medieval Studies at York and the Institute for the Medieval Studies at Leeds
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

The White Rose Medieval Graduate Conference: Self & Selves

The Centre for Medieval Studies at York and the Institute for the Medieval Studies at Leeds have sponsored a new postgraduate conference: the White Rose Medieval Graduate Conference! Our theme for the 2021 virtual conference is Self & Selves.

Anti-Racist Comparison: What is Comparison after Eurocentrism?

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 10:43am
MLA 2022 : CLCS-Medieval Forum
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

The discipline of Comparative Literature has already been through its “age of multiculturalism” (1995) and its “age of globalization” (2006), in the effort to displace European/Eurocentric hierarchies of value with more nuanced goals for literary study. As Comparative Literature has diversified, however, medieval studies has often been aligned with the old Eurocentrisms. What can medieval studies contribute to the next phase of the discipline, the “age of anti-racism”?Please send 250 word abstracts to Michelle Warren (michelle.r.warren@dartmouth.edu) by March 15th.

PCA: Medievalism in Popular Culture, VIRTUAL

updated: 
Monday, February 8, 2021 - 12:59pm
Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

CFP: Medievalism in Popular Culture

PCA/ACA 2021 National Conference

Jun 2nd – 5th – VIRTUAL

 

The Medievalism in Popular Culture Area (including Early to Later Middle Ages, Robin Hood, Arthurian, Chaucer, Norse, and other materials connected to medieval studies) accepts papers on all topics that explore either popular culture during the Middle Ages or transcribe some aspect of the Middle Ages into the popular culture of later periods. These representations can occur in any genre, including film, television, novels, graphic novels, gaming, advertising, art, etc. For this year’s conference, I would like to encourage submissions on some of the following topics:

 

Premodern Affect (MLA, Guaranteed Sponsored Session)

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2021 - 3:48pm
Andreea Marculescu, LLC Medieval French
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

The recent “affective turn” derives from a Spinozist interpretation and complication of the dualist mind-body binary. The mind’s power to think is intimately entangled with and correlated to the body’s power to act. Affect refers to the body’s capacity to affect and be affected, to its sensitivity and connection to other bodies. Recent interpretations of affect link it to everyday modes of production, circulation, and consumption as well. For example, for Sara Ahmed affects, just like emotions, “stick” as they circulate between bodies and thus produce subjectivities that disrupt or reconfigure a status quo.

The Uses of Anachronism and Anachrony (MLA Guaranteed Session)

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2021 - 3:48pm
Noah Guynn (LLC Medieval French)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

Anachronism has long been the third rail of medieval studies—or, to quote Lucien Febvre, “the worst of all sins, the sin that cannot be forgiven.” Medievalists want to get our period “right,” which has often meant understanding it in relation to “euchronic” evidence. The intolerance of anachronism is, however, in conflict with medieval literary aesthetics, which often troubles differences between past and present. It is also at odds with recent developments in adjacent fields.

Racial Capitalism and the Middle Ages (MLA Sponsored Session)

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2021 - 3:48pm
Noah Guynn (LLC Medieval French), Shirin Khanmohamadi (CLCS Medieval)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

Coined by Cedric J. Robinson in his magnum opus Black Marxism (1983), the term “racial capitalism” refers to the simultaneous and interdependent rise of global capitalism and racial classification and stratification. Robinson’s principal goal is to identify a tradition of radical thought and practice among Black intellectuals and activists in sites of colonial exploitation. He therefore decenters Marxist history by shifting our attention away from metropolitan Europe as a site of political radicalization. Black Marxism begins, however, in the European Middle Ages, which in Robinson’s view gave rise both to modern myths of whiteness and to the racialization of the proletariat.

On Going: figuring journey, position and place

updated: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 1:03pm
Christian Literary Studies Group, Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 31, 2021

Day conference
Corpus Christi College, Oxford, UK, Saturday 6 November 2021 
We are looking for papers which consider journeying, place and the way as tropes in ancient or modern texts, and we look especially for associations with Christian and Biblical themes.

Papers normally have a reading time of about 20 minutes, and are followed by a few minutes of discussion. They are offered for publication in The Glass and subsequently on the CLSG website.

The deadline for offering a paper is 31 May 2021. Send a provisional title and a few lines on how you will tackle your topic. Email Dr Roger Kojecký, secretary@clsg.org

Interpretations, Appropriations, and Rewritings of Giovanni Boccaccio

updated: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 11:50am
11th International Montevideana Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

The Department of European Literature at the University of the Republic (Uruguay) announces its 11th International Montevideana Conference, to be held virtually.

 

It is tempting to think of Boccaccio's most important work in relation to our current times, given that in recent months the Decameron has become a virtual meeting place through rewrites, seminars, and group readings dedicated to the text. The superposition of his pandemic with ours has become, in more than one sense, a paradoxical kind of locus amoenus, adding a new layer to the varied investigations and artistic appropriations that this Italian text has motivated in its 700 years of existence.

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference CFP: Drama and Society (Nov. 11-14 2021)

updated: 
Friday, January 22, 2021 - 1:58pm
Kimberly Jew, University of Utah
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

 

PAMLA 2021 LAS VEGAS: "CITY OF GOD, CITY OF DESTRUCTION" (Thursday, November 11 - Sunday, November 14, 2021 at Sahara Las Vegas Hotel, hosted by University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

 

Session: Drama and Society

Contacts: Kimberly Jew, University of Utah (kimberly.jew@utah.edu) & Judith Saunders (judith.saunders1@gmail.com)

Corporeal Creations: Bodily Figurations of Creativity (Online Workshop)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2021 - 2:43pm
University of Tübingen (CRC 1391)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 18, 2021

From John Gower’s account of Robert Grosseteste’s construction of a talking head to George Herbert’s depiction of the heart as a place for divine encounters; from Ben Jonson’s pride in his literary offspring to Victor Frankenstein’s horrified reaction to the physical reality of his own creation, creativity has long been thought of in bodily terms. Imagery centered on the human body – and, frequently, on its procreative propensities – serves to configure the relationship between creator and creation or to describe interpersonal exchange and mutual dependence; bodily metaphors are useful both in celebrating human achievements and castigating Promethean pride and solipsistic self-involvement.

New Chaucer Studies: Pedagogy and Profession

updated: 
Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 11:29pm
Katie Little
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

 

Call for Papers

 

New Chaucer Studies:  Pedagogy and Profession

Movement: 2021 Medieval Studies Student Colloquium

updated: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 1:20pm
Medieval Studies Student Colloquium at Cornell
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 15, 2021

The Medieval Studies Program at Cornell University is pleased to announce its thirty-first annual graduate student colloquium (MSSC). The conference will take place on the 26th and the 27th of March, to be held virtually over Zoom.

This year’s colloquium focuses on the theme of movement. Movement denotes the movement of peoples, cultures, thoughts and goods, the migration of plants and of animals. What happens to movement when it is frozen in stone (the swoop of hair across a person’s face in a marble statue)? How does an idea change when it is translated from one language to another? We are interested in movement defined broadly and represented across a range of disciplines.

OA Journal Translat Library is Accepting Submissions

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 10:00am
Translat Library - University of Massachusetts Amherst
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 1, 2021

Call for Papers -- Translat Library is accepting submissions.

Translat Library is a new open access journal devoted to the literary culture of Europe (1200-1600), with an emphasis on vernacular translations, the Romance letters, and the Latin tradition. Translat Library publishes short rigorous essays contributing new documentation and editions of unpublished texts.

Call for book reviewers

updated: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 5:23pm
Religion and the Arts, Boston College
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 1, 2021

Religion and the Arts, a peer-reviewed journal edited at Boston College and published by Brill of the Netherlands, is looking for writers with professional experience and an advanced degree to write individual book reviews and combined review-essays in the fields of religion and literature, poetry, music, dance, architecture, film, and art history. Our reviewers are academics, independent scholars, writers, poets, artists, teachers, and clergy. 

 

Please send a short bio and vita to relarts@bc.edu describing your education, publications, and current interests: as well as any recent books (2019 forward) you might like to review. 

Questionning the Crime of Witchcraft: Definitions, Receptions and Realities (14th-16th Centuries)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:11pm
Maxime Gelly-Perbellini / EHESS, Paris, France
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 30, 2020

In the last decades, the multiplications of works in the field of Witchcraft Studies made it possible to profoundly renew the approaches and the study designs of the repression of witchcraft in the late Middle Ages and in the beginning of the Early Modern Era. Consequently, research has substantially specified the methods and configurations (ideological, political and doctrinal) that contribute to the genesis of the “witch-hunt”. Research also uncovered that the repression of witchcraft could take a number of different forms depending on the contexts, the spaces studied, the sources and the aims they seem to pursue. It underlines the extreme plasticity of the accusation of witchcraft and the categories of such a crime.

“Climates of Consciousness” (IMC Leeds 2021)

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2020 - 2:05pm
Oecologies Research Cluster
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 27, 2020

Call for Papers for Session Proposals
at the International Medieval Congress (IMC 2021)
Sponsored by the Oecologies Research Cluster
05–08 July 2021
University of Leeds

Renaissance Conference of Southern California

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2020 - 9:47am
CFP
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 9, 2020

Renaissance Conference of Southern California

65th Annual Conference

Saturday, 20 March 2021

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for our first virtual or webinar 65th RCSC Annual Conference.

We are honored that our roundtable participants, scheduled originally for last year, have agreed to share their ideas about Interdisciplinary Research and its complexities at RCSC 2021.

PLENARY ROUNDTABLE

Interdisciplinary Research and the Renaissance

NeMLA 2021: Fairy Tales and Adaptation

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 11:45am
Ana Oancea, University of Delaware
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Fairy Tales and Adaptation

 

This panel is part of the 52nd annual convention of the NeMLA, held March 11-14, 2021. Presenters will be able to give their papers either virtually, or in person in Philadelphia.

The panel proposes a discussion of the transformations fairy tales undergo when being adapted into new media (for example, Hansel and Gretel as an opera), new cultures (Hans Christian Andersen’s Little Mermaid as Hayao Miyazaki’s Ponyo) and new historical or theoretical contexts (Catherine Breillat’s Sleeping Beauty).

"For the ankres was expert in swech thyngys": Enclosure in Medieval Literature (1)

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:07pm
Stacie Vos, UC San Diego
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

The 2020 pandemic has required everyone to think about the boundaries of self and body in new ways, but these questions were already at the center of medieval devotional texts from the Ancrene Wisse to the Shewings of Julian of Norwich, and even The Book of Margery Kempe, in which Margery seeks harbor wherever she goes. 

 

This session asks for presentations related to enclosure and isolation in medieval art, history and literature, especially works that influence prose writings in the vernacular. 

 

What did cloistered living offer to nuns and anchoresses, and what did the cloister offer to the outside world?

 

Medieval and Early Modern Literature at CEA (April 8-10, 2021)

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 11:59am
Lynne Simpson / College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

The College English Association’s 52st national conference, from April 8-10, 2021, will focus on the theme of justice, and will be held in Birmingham, Alabama, where the freedom ensured by civil rights has been contested by the government in both the past and present. Birmingham’s notoriety as a focal point of the Civil Rights Movement, including the Birmingham Campaign, the imprisonment of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the writing of his “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is matched by the city’s renown for forging steel, founding Veteran’s Day, and hosting the USA’s second-oldest drag queen pageant.

Philomela and Her Descendents: Re-membering Traumatized Women in Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:33pm
Audrey Gradzewcz/NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Philomela is devoted sister, is victim of a brutal rape and mutilation, is weaver, is revenger, is nightingale. The specter of Philomela haunts the western canon, where she is a shorthand for rape, where the song of the nightingale is shorthand for suffering. Where Philomela is invoked, the ingenious weaver of the Metamorphoses is newly silenced by threadbare retellings. In Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women, Philomela is severed from both revenge and transformation; as Lavinia in Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, she is severed from the consolation and commiseration of other women; and in Eliot’s The Wasteland, her “inviolable voice” is severed from her violated body, laments to the crude unhearing.

Call for Articles: Between Art and Life. The Gargantuan World of Medieval Laughter

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:32pm
Vox medii aevi
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Call for Articles: Between Art and Life. The Gargantuan World of Medieval LaughterSUBMISSION: 15TH APRIL 2021PUBLISHING: NOVEMBER 2021Laughter has been a favourite topic for medievalists for many decades, yet the potential for new research remains great. Approaches have traditionally been framed through the work of Mikhail Bakhtin, whose ideas on carnival culture have long defined understandings of medieval comedy throughout the global scholarly community. Reflecting on the many ways that the study of humour has changed over the past decades, and on the multidisciplinary approaches that have driven these changes, in this issue we welcome new interpretations of medieval humour, comedy, and laughter.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2021: Treating Animals: Veterinary Science in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 9:59am
International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo; May 7-10, 2020. Special Session.
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Medieval animal studies has tended to privilege literary and encyclopedic texts, viewing animals within Aristotelian hierarchies of rationality, while research on animals in medieval medicine has focused on their use as ingredients, rather than their potential status as patients. There have been few discussions of animals and humans in relationships of care, or of animals as the recipients of medical treatment. In this panel, we seek to expand these conversations by centering veterinary medicine, including treatment manuals (e.g., hawking handbooks), literary representations of veterinary practices (e.g., romance heroes caring for horses), and other genres that concern the (un)ethical, (il)legal, or (im)proper treatment, training, or keeping of animals.

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