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CFP Art, Disease, and Expression - Issue 31, FORUM Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts, 30 November 2020

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 11:15am
FORUM Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts, University of Edinburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 30, 2020

FORUM Postgraduate Journal Call for Papers 

Issue 31 (2020): Art, Disease, and Expression

Science and art are the very nature of human attempts to understand and describe the world around us. As COVID-19 continues to dominate public discourse across the world - its ongoing effects trickling into every facet of our lives - the relationship between our health and how it affects the way we move through society has never felt more prescient. The 31st issue of FORUM aims to explore what has been identified as ‘sickness’ in literature and art through the years. How have the body and mind been treated by writers, artists, and cultural commentators - in sickness and in health.

Remainder from Epistemology: Exploring the Discursive Possibilities of Aporia

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 9:50am
Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

Remainder from Epistemology: Exploring the Discursive Possibilities of Aporia

Man has not been able to describe himself as a configuration in the episteme without thought at the same time discovering, both in itself and outside itself, at the borders yet also in its very warp and woof, an element of darkness, an apparently inert density in which it is embedded, an unthought which it contains entirely, yet in which it is also caught.

– Michel Foucault

Disaster, Holocaust, and Dystopian Literature: Concepts and Perspectives

updated: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 12:08pm
Parul Mishra / GD Goenka University, Gurugram, India
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 30, 2020

CALL FOR CHAPTERS

Proposed Title of the Book

Disaster, Holocaust, and Dystopian Literature: Concepts and Perspectives

Sub- Themes

  1. Understanding Disaster, Holocaust and Dystopian Literature

  2. Theorizing Disaster, Holocaust and Dystopian Literature

  3. Socio-cultural Perspectives

  4. Psycho-political Perspectives

  5. Historical Perspectives

  6. Pandemic Fear and Literature

Evelyn Scott Society -- SSAWW -- Deadline January 15, 2021

updated: 
Tuesday, October 13, 2020 - 11:19am
Evelyn Scott Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 15, 2021

The Evelyn Scott Society invites abstracts of 1-2 pages on the American writer Evelyn Scott (1893-1963). Papers may focus on any of her works (novels, short stories, memoir, poetry, young adult literature), and they may take any contemporary critical approach. We encourage papers that engage with the themes of the 2021 Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference: Ecologies, Survival, Change. Scott’s work showed keen awareness of the “dynamic, interlocking systems that make up our world,” and often revealed stresses and fault lines where systems conflicted. She also frequently represented resilience in the face of change and hardship, but also probed characters and situations where change was experienced irrevocably as loss.

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Jorge Luis Borges

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:11pm
José Eduardo González/University of Nebraska
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Proposals are invited for a volume in the MLA's Approaches to Teaching World Literature series entitled Approaches to Teaching the Works of Jorge Luis Borges.

Essays in this volume could address teaching Borges's work by focusing on topics such as philosophy, religion, mythology, detective fiction, gender relations/gender conflict, politics, the fantastic, history, popular literature, film and other arts, translation. Borges’ works are taught in so many different courses and contexts (Modern Languages, English, History, Philosophy, Religion) that we welcome essays teaching Borges in non-traditional settings or to non-literature students. Contributors are also invited to propose essays on topics not mentioned above.

Outside the Western Box - In Search of the Primary

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:07pm
The Charles Olson Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 15, 2021

Outside the Western Box—In Search of the Primary

Organized by the Charles Olson Society

American Literature Association, May 27-30, 2021

The Charles Olson Society will sponsor a session at the American Literature Association Conference, to be held in Boston, May 27-30, 2021.

The Detective, the Artist, and the Professor: Genre and Other Critical Mysteries

updated: 
Saturday, October 10, 2020 - 5:57pm
Mollie Copley Eisenberg / University of Southern California
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 19, 2020

This is a call for papers for a panel to run at NeMLA 2021, which will be conducted virtually March 11-14, 2021. Submit an abstract by October 19, 2020 [deadline extended] here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18807

This panel seeks to convene a conversation that theorizes the relationship between the detective novel, the art novel as it has been understood since modernism, and professional literary study—and in doing so move the critical study of detective fiction beyond the impulse to validate the genre as an object of study or redeem it from the stigma of genre.

Life Writing as World Literature

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:37am
ACLA April 8-11, 2021 (Virtual)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 30, 2020

 

Life Writing as World Literature, ACLA April 8-11, 2021 (Virtual)

This panel brings the fields of world literature and life writing together to explore social, economic and ideological contexts informing the circulation, translation and reading of auto/biographical texts. Redefinitions of world literature highlight the “effective life” of works “within a literary system beyond that of its original culture” (Damrosch 2003) or underscore that literature now “is unmistakably a planetary system” (Moretti 2000).

The Postcolonial Bildungsroman

updated: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 1:48pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Originally an 18th-century German innovation, the bildungsroman became a popular literary genre across the Anglo-American world during the 19th century. A ‘coming of age’ novel about young adults in search of meaning, the genre was the literary medium of choice for many Western writers exploring the moral and psychological developments of characters traversing unfamiliar worlds and encountering new challenges and adventures.

Parallels and tensions: F. Scott Fitzgerald in dialogue

updated: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 1:48pm
Roberta Fabbri Viscardi and Marcela Lanius / Cambridge Scholars Publishing
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 1, 2021

2020 marks the centennial celebration of the publication of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s first novel, This Side of Paradise. Because a centennial is also a time to look back in order to reevaluate, reassess and then speculate on the future, we invite scholars to explore and analyze not only the lasting significance of Fitzgerald's oeuvre, but also the many possible parallels and/or tensions between his work and that of other writers and artists. Essays that turn to new perspectives and expand upon connections between Fitzgerald’s work and other literary and artistic expressions are also especially welcome.

Topics may include (but are not limited) to:

 

Bored to Death: What do we talk about when we talk about boredom?

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2020 - 2:23pm
ACLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

What is boredom and why do we feel bored? Recently, research on boredom has gained momentum in the scientific community, particularly in neuroscience and clinical psychology, where the symptoms of boredom and the behavioral patterns of the bored person are scrutinized (i.e. Boredomlab). Boredom, however, has been explored by philosophers for centuries and has been making a persistent appearance in the modern novel from nineteenth and century to present, in the moments of contemplation, waiting, idleness or complaints of bored characters.

The International Research Journal, Thesis, announces the call for manuscripts for the December edition

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2020 - 9:43am
Thesis - Journal, AAB College
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2020

The International Research Journal, Thesis, announces the call for manuscripts for the December edition

 

Thesis is an international research journal with double-blind peer review, which is published by AAB College in Prishtina.

The journal presents an international forum for empirical, qualitative, critical and interpretative studies, on interdisciplinary research in the Social Sciences and Humanities: Economics, Law, Linguistics, Media Studies and Communication, Pedagogical & Educational Research, Political Sciences and International Relations.

Black Experience in the White Gaze: Framing Afro-Latin American Identities in XIX-XX Centuries

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:54am
Karina Sembe / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This panel is a part of the 52nd Annual Convention of the The Northeast Modern Language Association. The conference will take place at the Marriott Hotel Downtown in Philadelphia, PA, with the support of the University of Pennsylvania, the local host institution.

The deadline for abstracts is September 30, 2020.

We invite participants to explore some of the ways in which Afro-Latin American experience was narrated by writers, scientists, and politicians in Latin America 19th to mid-20th century and beyond. We encourage participants to address Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Lusophone contexts of the said regions and the ties between these.

The Ancient and Modern Traditions of Introspective Analysis

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In a letter to Lucilius, Seneca distinguishes between a person's being and "the trappings in which he is clothed," urging his interlocutor to "consider [the] soul" in order to distinguish true being from false appearance. In addition to the distinction he makes between being and appearance, Seneca indicates here an analytical tool by which Lucilius can learn to see beyond illusory appearances in order to comprehend the true nature of things (animum intuere). Seneca's instrumental approach to this analysis constitutes a major component of the Ancient tradition of introspective analysis: across genres ancient authors such as Virgil, Propertius, Martial, Horace, Tacitus, Plato, and Aristotle performed similar analyses.

Established and Contemporary Caribbean Voices (Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Caribbean novelists, poets, and playwrights have contributed inestimable riches to the world of literature. How have the themes and styles of established Caribbean voices, including Brathwaite, Walcott, Cliff, and Naipaul, been adapted or diverged from by younger Caribbean voices? Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words and be submitted via the Northeast Modern Language Association website. Go to http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/callforpapers/submit.html

Call for Abstracts: NeMLA 2021 Panel (Virtual/Hybrid Platform) on Newspapers, Modernism, and Transnational Print Networks

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:48am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The 52nd NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association) Convention (Philadelphia, PA) is now going to be held on a hybrid/virtual platform between March 11 and 14, 2021. This means you can present your papers virtually from anywhere in the world without having to travel to Philadelphia, PA. We now hope to hear more from scholars and students living outside of the US. Please consider sending your abstracts to our panels by September 30! See this link for more instructions: http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/callforpapers/submit.html

 Reposting my own panel description here for anyone interested in global modernism and print networks:

"Essential Workers": Precarious Labor in the Literary Imagination

updated: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 3:41pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

52nd Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

March 11-14, 2021 / Philadelphia, PA

In light of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic and public debate about who or what kind of work is deemed “essential,” this panel seeks to examine the intersection of literature and labor, prioritizing depictions of precarious workers who are sacrificing their personal well-being for the public good, but also to maintain their own economic security.

Reading in Theory (ACLA 2021--Virtual)

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:05pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Despite the proliferation of critical engagements with theories of reading by scholars of literary studies, it seems fair to say that relatively little has changed since Paul de Man claimed, “the resistance to theory is in fact a resistance to reading, a resistance that is perhaps at its most effective, in contemporary studies, in the methodologies that call themselves theories of reading but nevertheless avoid the function they claim as their object” (The Resistance to Theory 15). This panel asks, is this resistance brought to a theory of reading, as if from “the outside,” or is resistance internal to any theory of reading? In what ways does reading generate and/or depend on its own resistances?

 

Chapter on Molly Keane (M.J. Farrell) and the Gothic for edited collection "Middlebrow Gothic: Dark Domesticity in British Popular Fiction, 1920-1960"

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:05pm
Christopher Yiannitsaros
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 10, 2020

A chapter which explores the fiction of middlebrow author Molly Keane (alias: M.J. Farrell) in realtion to the Gothic is sought to round off the edited collection Middlebrow Gothic: Dark Domesticity in British Popular Fiction, 1920-1960.

 

The original CfP is as follows:

 

Evil in/and Stephen King: Essay Volume

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 12:22am
Hong Kong Baptist University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 6, 2020

The concept of evil received much attention throughout the 20th century. Despite the industrial scale atrocities committed in Nazi Germany, Stalinist Russia, and Maoist China, alongside the genocides in Cambodia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Rwanda, as well as the explosion of serial killers like Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer, and Andrei Chikatilo in the latter part of the 20th century, the first two decades of the 21st century have been largely unconcerned with rigorous discussion of such evil.

Revisiting Rukeyser's Elegies in Times Like These

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:08pm
Elisabeth Daumer
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 1, 2020

This two-day webinar, scheduled for February 19-20, 2020, centers on Muriel Rukeyser’s critically neglected cycle of ten Elegies, published over the span of a decade, from 1939-1948, and recently republished by New Directions.  Rukeyser’s Elegies offer a personal reckoning with failure, both personal and collective. They lament the defeat of liberatory struggles in Spain, the advance of fascism, the devastations of World War II and the Shoah, as well as heart-wrenching personal losses, among them the death of a beloved and the betrayal by friends and co-travelers.

Domestic Politics: Women’s Private Lives and Public Writing in the Mid-Century

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:01pm
Edited Collection
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 1, 2020

The mid-twentieth century saw seismic shifts for British women, including those living under British rule in the colonies, in the public and private spheres. These years are often imagined as a wave of expansion and constriction, with the swelling of economic and political freedoms for women in the 1930s, the cresting of women in the public sphere during the Second World War, and the resulting break as employment and political opportunities for women dwindled in the 1950s when men returned home from the Front. But this narrative needs reexamining.

NeMLA 2021: British Literature and Film: Finding 'Englishness' [hybrid/virtual platform]

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 11:59am
NeMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In this session, we will especially focus on how the British classic literature of the 19th and early 20th centuries have been adapted concerning Thatcherism, the heritage industry, colonialism, Britishness (Englishness). The so-called "Heritage Fever," which hit British society in the 1980s, was largely supported by national-led policy. In the 1980s, for example, cultural heritage preservation movements spread nationwide; museums and heritage centers around the country were created. A great deal of British interest in the so-called “Old England,” such as visiting historic sites, became an honor factor.

Palimpsest- East Delta University Journal of English Studies

updated: 
Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 2:00am
East Delta University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 25, 2020

Palimpsest 

 

East Delta University Journal of English Studies

Department of English 

East Delta University

Chattogram-4209, Bangladesh

 

Title of the Issue: “Multiculturalism and Multilingualism in Contemporary Humanities Studies”

 

Pages