modernist studies

RSS feed

Forms of Corruption in History and in Contemporary Society (CORHICS 2011), Paris 1 Sorbonne University, 14-16 Sept 2011

updated: 
Friday, May 27, 2011 - 7:16am
Ars Identitatis, Cultural Research Association

The etymology of the word "corruption" (lat. Co-rruptum) indicates either an alteration, or an act of seduction, but in any case it leads toward a rupture. In a broader meaning, corruption is understood as the behavior of a person who derails another one from his/her way, customs or duties, through the promise of money, honors or security. History shows that this phenomenon has generally been manifesting in different kinds of cultures and societies starting with the most ancient times. Today corruption is still a reality, generated by the particular economic, cultural and political conditions in both developing and developed countries.

CFP: Walking Around in the Space of Consumption and Segregation: Examining Place in Language and Literature / Deadline: Oct 15

updated: 
Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 8:41pm
Plaza: Dialogues in Language and Literature / University of Houston Graduate Literary Journal

We are currently seeking student-written articles and creative works that examine the role of place in literature, composition studies, folklore, cultural studies, language studies, and gender studies.]

Linda Flower complicates the idea of "place" as only a silent object of discourse in her introduction to City Comp, saying that "writing is not merely situated in and shaped by its time and place, but … the writer's sense of that time and place is the source of meanings, motivations, and identities." Whether discussing the city or country, we recognize the importance of place, both the physical space and the encoded values associated with it, in reflecting and creating identity and ideas.

Representing Eire: Ideology in Irish Cinema from John Ford to John Carney, NeMLA March 15-18, 2012

updated: 
Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 12:51pm
NeMLA

While the Abbey Theatre is perhaps the most familiar public context through which the nationalistic and aesthetic struggle to shape an identity for a (post)colonial Ireland was formed, expatriate Irish used the bourgeoning film industry to represent Ireland from an international perspective. Recent commercial successes have ranged from the international co-production of The Wind That Shakes the Barley, winning British director Ken Loach a Palme d'Or, to the Dublin grassroots construction of John Carney's Oscar-winning Once, but awards aside, a tension still exists between the Ireland of filming destination and the Ireland of film origination.

CFP: Queer Places, Practices, and Lives conference (May 18-19, 2012; abstracts due Aug. 12, 2011)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 10:36am
Ohio State University

QUEER PLACES, PRACTICES, AND LIVES: A SYMPOSIUM IN HONOR OF SAMUEL STEWARD

The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH

May 18-19, 2012

Deadline for proposals: Aug. 12, 2011

Confirmed speakers:
Joseph Boone, Tim Dean, Kale Fajardo, Roderick Ferguson, Brian Glavey, Scott Herring, Eithne Lubhéid, Victor Mendoza, Deborah Miranda, José Esteban Muñoz, Hoang Tan Nguyen, Juana María Rodríguez, Nayan Shah, Justin Spring, Susan Stryker, Shane Vogel

***

Conference CFP-Paranoia and Pain: Embodied in Psychology, Literature, and Bioscience, University of Liverpool, 2-4 April 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 - 6:35pm
Dr Neville Cobbe-Dr Maryam Farahani-Dr Ian Schermbrucker (University of Liverpool)

Paranoia and Pain (University of Liverpool, 2-4 April 2012) is an international cross-disciplinary conference, seeking to raise an awareness of various intersections of literature and science. The conference aims to explore overlapping paradigms of paranoia and pain in psychology, biological sciences, and literary texts/contexts.

Organising Chair:
Dr Maryam Farahani
School of English, University of Liverpool

Organising Board:
Dr Neville Cobbe (School of Biological Sciences)
Dr Maryam Farahani (School of English)
Dr Ian Schermbrucker (School of Psychology)

Conference Chair:
Dr Nick Davis
School of English, University of Liverpool

Keynotes and New Deadline: Aesthetics of Renewal

updated: 
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 - 11:21am
Canadian Association of American Studies

We are pleased to announce the plenary speakers for the 2011 conference, they are Linda Hutcheon and Michael Hutcheon, and Anthony Stewart. Further, the new deadline is 15 July 2011.

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Aesthetics of Renewal or "Everything Old is New Again"

3 – 6 November, 2011

Ottawa, Ontario

Carleton University's Centre for Research in American Studies invites submissions for the annual conference for the Canadian Association of American Studies to be held in Ottawa, Ontario from November 3rd – 6th, 2011. This year's theme is: "The Aesthetics of Renewal or 'Everything Old is New Again.'"

Forum Issue 13: "Vengeance" (1st September 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 - 6:49am
Forum, Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts (www.forumjournal.org)

Issue theme: Vengeance
Deadline: 1st September 2011

"Vengeance offers the writer a compelling mix of ingredients: strong situations shaped by violence; ethical issues for debate;
a volatile, emotive mixture of loss and agitated grievance. The avenger, isolated and vulnerable, can achieve heroic grandeur by coming to personify nemesis." – John Kerrigan, Revenge Tragedy

[UPDATE] - William Faulkner's Poetic Beginnings

updated: 
Monday, May 23, 2011 - 9:27pm
SAMLA 2011 - Victoria M. Bryan

As a fiction writer, William Faulkner saw himself as a failed poet. Many themes that crop up in his poetry, however, make appearances in his fiction writing, as well. This special session welcomes, but is not limited to, abstracts that examine Faulkner's poetry, the connections between his poetry and his fiction, common themes between his poetry and his fiction, Faulkner's stance of fiction vs. poetry, etc. Please send 250-300 word abstracts and brief CVs to Victoria M. Bryan (VMBryan@olemiss.edu) by June 15, 2011.

Race and Romance in Gone With the Wind, a panel for the Popular Romance in the New Millenium conference, Nov. 10-11, 2011

updated: 
Monday, May 23, 2011 - 1:21pm
Sondra Guttman

Margaret Mitchell's 1936 blockbuster bestseller Gone with the Wind is a book literary critics think they know. When read by academics today, it seems interesting mainly because it retells a particularly American story—the "Dunning School" version of Reconstruction history--familiar from films like Birth of a Nation. Apart from this racism at the level of plot, vivid images of black characters as dogs (for example), by turn loyal and threatening, likewise seem somehow beyond comment. For many, the book's racism is easily attributed to the garden-variety sort marking the culmination of the Jim Crow era and easily dismissible as irrelevant today.

Conference on The Literary Essay, July 2nd-3rd (London)

updated: 
Monday, May 23, 2011 - 7:55am
Thomas Karshan

***

Conference on the Literary Essay at Queen Mary, University of London, and the London Review Bookshop, July 2-3

This July 2-3, there will be a conference on the essay from
Montaigne to the present, which will be taking place at Queen
Mary and the London Review Bookshop, featuring Adam Phillips, Andrew O'Hagan, Geoff Dyer, Jeremy Treglown, Karl Miller, Hermione Lee, Gillian Beer, Markman Ellis, Peter Howarth, Ophelia Field, Felicity James, Uttara Natarajan, Stefano Evangelista, Adam Piette, Kathryn Murphy, and Sophie Butler.

Tickets and details available at:

[UPDATE]: Deadline Extended to June 15th- John Dos Passos: Giving Modernity Form (SAMLA, Nov. 4-6 2011)

updated: 
Sunday, May 22, 2011 - 11:54am
James Travis Rozier / University of Mississippi

This panel seeks submissions dealing with the works of John Dos Passos in the interests of reviving scholarship on an author who has received scant recent critical attention. In keeping with the theme of the convention, the topic will address ways in which Dos Passos's works represent, respond to or possibly resist the forces of modernity. This panel seeks papers which address the ways Dos Passos's work renders visible the forces of modernity and seeks to resist these forces. Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to, the ways in which Dos Passos' formal experimentation deals with the issues of alienation, flows of capital, new technologies, historical fracture or social loss. Submitters are encouraged to interpret this topic broadly.

KRISIS - Synapsis: European School for Comparative Studies, 4-11 Sept. 2011

updated: 
Sunday, May 22, 2011 - 7:10am
Synapsis, European School for Comparative Studies - Università di Bologna and Università di Siena (Italy)

Synapsis is a one-week residential Summer School, jointly sponsored by the Universities of Bologna and Siena in cooperation with many European universities and organizations.
Programme includes: 10 lectures (1½ hr each; two lectures each morning from Monday to Friday); 6 seminars of ten to fourteen students (12 hrs each, split in five afternoon and one morning sessions); theatre workshop; film screenings in the evenings. Participants are also given the opportunity to apply the knowledge acquired throughout the week to a research paper that may later be selected for publication.

[UPDATE] James Agee at SAMLA in Atlanta, Nov. 4-6, 2011 (proposals due June 1, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, May 21, 2011 - 2:56pm
James Agee Society

The James Agee Society requests proposals for 20-minute presentations on any aspect of James Agee's work, especially in connection with artistic and cultural trends of his times. Topics may include Agee's poetry, reconsiderations of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men and The Morning Watch, and Agee as screenwriter, film critic, and translator of foreign films. Of particular interest are papers treating the restored edition of A Death in the Family. By June 1, 2011, please submit 250-word abstracts to Hugh Davis at hdavis@piedmont.edu.

CFP "Circulations between Art Forms: Questioning Intersemioticity" Toulouse, France, March 31, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, May 21, 2011 - 11:39am
Marie C. Bouchet, University of Toulouse

"Circulations between Art Forms: Questioning Intersemioticity"

The purpose of this conference is to investigate how one conceives or experiences the circulation of representation between codes in intersemiotic works. It aims at examining what is at stake when one moves from one art form to another, as in adaptations, or when works themselves circulate between semiotic codes and combine them (operas, films, graphic novels, installations, iconotexts…). Is trans-code circulation fluid, or does one code predominate? Is intersemioticity merely the illusion of circulation, with codes remaining hermetic to one another, or is it the "effect" of another code instead of an actual circulation between systems of representation?

Social Media: Making Tangible Connections and Diversifying Trends in Communication Practice

updated: 
Friday, May 20, 2011 - 6:32pm
British Columbia Institute of Technology

Social Media: Making Tangible Connections and Diversifying Trends in Communication Practice

Julie Nolin, M.A.
British Columbia Institute of Technology

Bobbe Cummins Colburn, Ph.D.
City University

Call for Chapters:
Proposals Submission Deadline: September 1, 2011

Introduction
Social media are rapidly changing the way we educate, conduct business, and reach out to others across the globe. As such, we bring both the 'voices' of experience and research together, which augment the fields of media, education, and industry along with professional practice.

Alone Together/Together Alone UCLA Graduate Student Conference in French and Francophone Studies, Oct. 6-7 2011

updated: 
Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 2:27pm
UCLA Department of French and Francophone Studies Graduate Students

Alone Together/Together Alone
16th Annual UCLA Graduate Student Conference October 6-7 2011 With Keynote Speaker Tom Conley (Harvard)

"Technology proposes itself as the architect of our intimacies." Sherry Turkle, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other (Basic Books, 2011)

Are the Tulips Angry? Modernism's Nature, Northeast Modern Language Assoc, March 15-18, Rochester, NY

updated: 
Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 10:25am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

Where is nature in modernism? From Woolf's "Kew Gardens" to Eliot's The Waste Land, Modernist authors privileged the nature motif in their works. Literary critics have historically aligned Modernism with the urban and commercial growth of the industrial era, even though many authors—such as Cather and Keats—privileged literary ecologies. This panel will explore readings of the nature motif in Modernist novels and poems. We will begin by asking how Modernism's literary heritage—the genres of Romanticism, Victorian, Transcendentalism and Naturalism—affected the Modernist positioning of nature and ecology.

British Modernism in the Natural World panel, SAMLA conference (Nov. 4-6, 2011, Atlanta GA)

updated: 
Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 2:59am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association

Studies of British modernism often tend to orient themselves around questions of urbanity, cosmopolitanism, and globalism, reflecting the shifting cultural and geographical location of Britishness in the twentieth century. But many novelists and poets continued to take inspiration from the natural environment of the British homeland, and this panel asks what alternative modernisms can emerge from their writing, and how they can contribute to current environmental and literary discourse. What is the role of spaces of retreat or repose in modernism, or the importance of the local and the rural? What is the dynamic between experimentation and conservation in the modernist aesthetic?

Conference on the Literary Essay - July 2-3, 2011 - Queen Mary, University of London

updated: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 4:23pm
Queen Mary, University of London

Conference on the Literary Essay at Queen Mary and the London Review Bookshop, London, July 2-3

This July 2-3, there will be a conference on the literary essay from
Montaigne to the present, which will be taking place at Queen
Mary and the London Review Bookshop, featuring Adam Phillips, Andrew O'Hagan, Geoff Dyer, Jeremy Treglown, Karl Miller, Hermione Lee, Gillian Beer, Markman Ellis, Peter Howarth, Ophelia Field, Felicity James, Uttara Natarajan, Stefano Evangelista, Adam Piette, Kathryn Murphy, and Sophie Butler.

Tickets and details available at:

[UPDATE] Unexpected Agents: Considering agency beyond the boundaries of the human (1800 — the Present)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 3:10pm
University of Birmingham (English Department)

Online Registration is now open for:

'Unexpected Agents: Considering agency beyond the boundaries of the human (1800 — the Present)'

A One-day Postgraduate symposium at the University of Birmingham (English Dept.), June 24th 2011

Keynote Speaker: Sarah Kember (Goldsmiths, University of London)

Online Registration: https://www.bhamonlineshop.co.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&...

1st Annual International Conference on Cultures and Languages in Contact

updated: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 4:30am
Faculty of Letters & Human Sciences, El Jadida, Morocco

1st Annual International Conference on Cultures and Languages in Contact, 23-24 November, 2011
The Moroccan Culture Research Group
(MCRG)
Faculty of Letters & Human Sciences
El Jadida, Morocco

CALL FOR PAPERS

Katherine Mansfield

updated: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2011 - 4:26pm
Todd Martin / Katherine Mansfield Society

Panelists are invited to submit abstracts (250 words) for papers on Katherine Mansfield. Papers on any aspect of Mansfield or Mansfield studies will be considered. Send abstracts to Todd Martin, tmartin@huntington.edu by 15 Sept. 2011.

I am organizing a panel of 3 papers to be presented at the Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900. The Conference will be held February 23-25 2012

Pages