modernist studies

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[UPDATE] Re-production [Mar 4-5, 2011], Deadline [Jan 15, 2011]

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 6:05pm
Comparative Literature Graduate Student Organization, Binghamton University

Call for papers
Re-production
Binghamton University Comparative Literature Graduate Conference
Binghamton, NY
March 4 and 5, 2011
Keynote: BRIGID DOHERTY, Princeton University

Possibilities of the New: The Subject of Truth in Psychoanalysis - April 22-23, 2011; abstracts due Feb. 1, 2011

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 4:06pm
Cornell University Psychoanalysis Reading Group

Possibilities of the New: The Subject of Truth in Psychoanalysis

Featuring Keynote Speakers:
Ed Pluth, Associate Professor of Philosophy at California State University, Chico, and author of Badiou: A Philosophy of the New (2010) and Signifiers and Acts: Freedom in Lacan's Theory of the Subject (2007).

Charles Shepherdson, Professor of English at SUNY Albany and author of Lacan and the Limits of Language (2008) and Vital Signs: Nature, Culture, Psychoanalysis (2000).

April 22-23, 2011
Cornell University
Ithaca, New York

Composing Live(s): Writing the Self and the Other within the Disciplines - March 25, 2011

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 1:44pm
Miami University English Graduate Student and Adjunct Association

The 8th Annual Miami University English Graduate Student and Adjunct Association Symposium

Composing Live(s): Writing the Self and the Other within the Disciplines

March 25, 2011, 9:00-4:00
Oxford, Ohio

"To withdraw myself from myself has ever been my sole, my entire, my sincere motive in scribbling at all." --- Lord Byron

Writing about lives, writing that lives, or writing that comes to us live from an immediate, connected source shapes how we as scholars and teachers conceive of ourselves and others. Writing works within and out of academia to continually (re)define what is and is not important, what is and is not canonized, and what is and is not ignored within many discourse communities.

THE GENRES OF AMERICAN TRAVEL WRITING

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 12:20pm
Society for American Travel Writing, American Literature Association

The Society for American Travel Writing invites proposals for papers that examine the overlap between Travel Writing and other Genres for the 2011 American Literature Association Conference, May 26-9, 2011 in Boston.

Travel Writing has never been a coherent genre with tidy and easily identifiable formal characteristics. Indeed, depictions of travel exist in all manner of texts. The SATW invites papers that explore the formal differences between various genres of travel writing, such as biography and autobiography, nature writing, epistolary writing, poetry, the novel, and documentary and/or feature film.

ECO-TRAVEL WRITING BEFORE THERE WAS ECOTRAVEL

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 12:16pm
Society for American Travel Writing, American Literature Association

The Society for American Travel Writing invites proposals for papers on the topic of "Eco-Travel Writing" for the 2011 American Literature Association Conference, May 26-9, 2011 in Boston.

In common parlance, ecotravel suggests environmentally conscious vacationing that is often coupled with service activities intended to clean up pollution or improve sustainability. While travel explicitly organized around environmental concerns may be a relatively new development, respect for alien environments and cultures was not invented in 1980. The SATW invites proposals for papers that explore forerunners to "ECOTRAVEL" that occur throughout American literary history.

Echoes of Trauma: Exploring the Intersections of Trauma and Culture

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 11:06am
LSU English Graduate Student Association

21st Annual Mardi Gras Conference at Louisiana State University
Hosted by the English Graduate Student Association
March 3 – 4, 2011

Keynote Address by Dr. Shoshana Felman, Emory University

"Echoes of Trauma: Exploring the Intersections of Trauma and Culture"

Henry James Society/ MLA--January 2012

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 9:10am
Henry James Society

Henry James and/as cultural capital
James as an established/contested literary figure in the academic marketplace; James's awareness of the operation of cultural/literary capital as displayed in his works. One-page abstracts by 28 February 2011 to Donatella Izzo, donatella.izzo@fastwebnet.it

Worldly James: MLA 2012

updated: 
Monday, November 29, 2010 - 9:09am
Henry James Society

Worldly James
Papers might consider issues such as: James as exemplary "worldly" author in Edward Said's sense; re-reading James in a global perspective; James and/as world literature; etc. One-page abstracts by 28 February 2011 to Donatella Izzo, donatella.izzo@fastwebnet.it

[UPDATE] Transformations deadline December 30, 2010

updated: 
Sunday, November 28, 2010 - 8:01pm
Humanities Education and Research Association [HERA]

HERA (Humanities Education and Research Association) is exploring
Transformations that occur in four groupings or "streams"; transformative
Humanities pedagogy, Humanities research, creative contributions, and making the most of this transformative
moment.
Transformative Humanities Pedagogy highlights Humanities teaching
at all levels, engaged learning, and teaching to transform
Transformative Humanities Research includes Humanities research in many disciplines including but not limited to Architecture, Art, Art History, Aesthetics, Classics, Composition, Dance,

International Conference on Psychology and the Arts, Denmark, Roskilde University near Copenhagen, June 22-26, 2011

updated: 
Sunday, November 28, 2010 - 11:00am
PsyArt Foundation

We are pleased to announce that the International Conference on Psychology and the Arts will be held at Roskilde University, Denmark, close to Copenhagen, June 22-26, 2011. Our hosts will be Professor Camelia Elias of Roskilde University and Professor Bent Sørensen of Aalborg University. The conference sponsors are the PsyArt Foundation and Roskilde and Aalborg Universities.

Poetry and Cognition

updated: 
Sunday, November 28, 2010 - 8:48am
Princeton University

"Poetry and Cognition" (April 15-16, 2011)

This two-day graduate student conference, to be held at Princeton University, will bring together graduate students and faculty from a range of disciplines to discuss the relationships between theories of mind developed by philosophers, cognitive scientists and linguists, and the poetry of different cultures and eras. The conference will feature a keynote address by Ian Lancashire, Professor of English at The University of Toronto.

Ravenna is online

updated: 
Saturday, November 27, 2010 - 1:52am
http://www.oscholars.com/Ravenna/ravennahub.htm

Ravenna (ISSN 2045-5127) is an online interdisciplinary journal devoted to the relationship between nineteenth-century Britain and Italy. Ravenna is edited by Elisa Bizzotto and Luca Caddia and published by Steven Halliwell at The Rivendale Press as one of THE OSCHOLARS group of fin de siècle journals under the general editorship of David Charles Rose.

http://oscholars.com/Ravenna/ravennahub.htm

Ravenna is now accepting submissions for articles and reviews of recent books for future issues. If you are interested in sending a proposal, please contact the editors at the following email addresses:

Literature, Faith, and Metamorphosis: Transformative

updated: 
Friday, November 26, 2010 - 4:23pm
2011 West Regional Conference on Christianity & Literature, Vanguard University of Southern California

http://vanguardccl.wordpress.com/
Proposals for scholarly or creative panels, interdisciplinary sessions, round tables, or individual fifteen to twenty-minute presentations on the interface between literary studies and Christianity. Special consideration will be given to papers relating to the conference theme, "transformative journeys."

Monster Classics, 2011 ACCUTE conference May 28-31 Fredericton, NB

updated: 
Friday, November 26, 2010 - 1:41pm
ACCUTE

That Pride and Prejudice would inspire a zombie rewriting was perhaps surprising to Austen fans and critics, but "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" has itself inspired enough monstrous mash-ups from "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Zombie Jim" to "Jane Slayre" to constitute a genuine genre: monster classics. Something of a pun on the afterlife of fiction, what, if anything, do these neo-Romantic and neo-Victorian monstrosities suggest about the culture from which they are drawn? About our own culture? This panel welcomes papers that consider any aspect of the monster classic phenomena, from theories of adaptation and mutation to considerations of genre or canon.

Monster Classics, 2011 ACCUTE conference May 28-31 Fredericton, NB

updated: 
Friday, November 26, 2010 - 1:40pm
ACCUTE

That Pride and Prejudice would inspire a zombie rewriting was perhaps surprising to Austen fans and critics, but "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" has itself inspired enough monstrous mash-ups from "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Zombie Jim" to "Jane Slayre" to constitute a genuine genre: monster classics. Something of a pun on the afterlife of fiction, what, if anything, do these neo-Romantic and neo-Victorian monstrosities suggest about the culture from which they are drawn? About our own culture? This panel welcomes papers that consider any aspect of the monster classic phenomena, from theories of adaptation and mutation to considerations of genre or canon.

Call for contributions: censorship and literature in English-speaking countries, 16th-21st centuries

updated: 
Friday, November 26, 2010 - 1:35pm
ACE - University of Rennes 2 UEB - France

Call for Contributions: collected essays on censorship and literature in English speaking countries, 16th-21st centuries

With the development of the modern state, there has been an ongoing tension between the will to control and at the same time allow free speech to develop. In English-speaking countries, the theme of "Censorship and Discourse" has been a recurrent concern from the 16th century to the present day, as the numerous censored publications and writings against censorship testify.

Free Books for Review - No Deadline

updated: 
Thursday, November 25, 2010 - 2:29pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal/ Anaphora Literary Press

Are you interested in receiving a free book from the publisher in exchange for writing a thorough 1,200-1,600 word review of the book? If so, the Pennsylvania Literary Journal is seeking requests from professors in all literary fields. Please choose one of the publishers from the following list (these have already agreed to send free books, and most have already sent at least one book to one of our reviewers):

University Press of Colorado
University of Nebraska Press
Hackett
Duke University Press
Columbia University Press
Palgrave Macmillan
Ashgate
The University of Alabama Press
University of Chicago Press
John Hopkins University Press
Rodopi
Ohio State University Press

[Update] Paris in American Literature, Edited Volume

updated: 
Thursday, November 25, 2010 - 8:33am
Jeffrey Herlihy and Vamsi K. Koneru, Editors

We invite submissions from new and established scholars for a volume on the role of Paris in American Literature. Original articles, theoretical pieces, linguistic analyses, and historical perspectives concerning any period, are welcome.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

Contexts:

History of Americans in Paris
Literary Life in France

Interpretations:

Expatriate Cultural Mimicry
Use of French Language by Americans in Paris
Imagining Americans: Parisian Responses to Artistic Exiles
Displacing Plymouth to Paris: Writing New Identity

Authors:

Text and Image

updated: 
Wednesday, November 24, 2010 - 11:06am
Columbia University French Graduate Student Association

The French Graduate Student Association of Columbia University is pleased to announce its 20th Graduate Student conference, to be held March 4th, 2011.

The conference will take as its theme text and image in French and world literatures and art. We will explore how text and image complement and interact and compete with one another in composite works, and how an understanding of each can inform readings of hybrid works, such as textual/lettrist art, visual poetry, film, and even theatre. Graduate students of all departments are welcome to submit abstracts of 300-500 words, and we especially welcome projects with a comparative focus and/or approach. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

The Right to Vote and the Writing of Voice (Seminar at the AIS) deadline 12.10.2010

updated: 
Tuesday, November 23, 2010 - 2:19am
ASSOCIATION FOR ISRAEL STUDIES (AIS) [June 13-15 2011]

The Right to Vote and the Writing of Voice

The word kol in Hebrew means "voice" as well as "vote", thus implying kol as having the potential for political power. In our seminar we wish to examine the interplay of power and the use of voice/vote: voices creating or deconstructing identities, voices heard or unheard in the literary piece, granted or disowned voices. Who has the right to speak in Hebrew literature? What are the literary means enabling the freedom of speech? How does this relationship of power and voice come into play in the literary piece? What are the places of the muffled, choked voice? What are the places of the loud, screaming voice? How does canonization tune/orchestrate the different voices within literature?

Oklahoma State University English Conference, "Transforming Words," March 4-5, 2011

updated: 
Monday, November 22, 2010 - 8:45pm
Oklahoma State University English Graduate Student Association

The English Graduate Student Association (EGSA) at Oklahoma State University, an organization of English graduate students and faculty members committed to promoting student academic development and scholastic achievement, is currently accepting proposals for its annual graduate conference. The theme of this year's conference is "Transforming Words." In his 1969 work, The Way to Rainy Mountain, N. Scott Momaday asserts, "We have all been changed by words; we have been hurt, delighted, puzzled, filled with wonder." During the conference, we would like to explore the practical ways language functions to effect change. How can language overcome supposed barriers of race and gender?

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