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Georgia State University's New Voices Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 2:21pm
"Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" / Georgia State University - English Department

Georgia State New Voices Conference 2010, October 7-9: What makes us laugh? Why is humor such an important cross-cultural phenomenon and universal human trait? What are the genres of humor and comedy? Can postmodernism and critical theory be funny? How can we teach humor? What are the theories of laughter? How do we research and write about humor, comedy, laughter, wit, satire, and jokes across disciplines? How global is humor? What is the place of humor in academia and in popular culture?

Filolog - journal for literary, cultural and language studies

updated: 
Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 11:38am
Faculty of Philology, Banja Luka

Filolog (Philologist) is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary, social sciences and humanities journal with an international Editorial Board.

We are calling for papers dealing with contemporary literary, cultural, and language theories and/or their applications to particular works. We would also welcome papers dealing with meta-theories and their significance for the human and social sciences.

Papers should be a maximum of 5000 words and use the New Harvard Citation System. Papers must include abstracts and key words in the author's native language. Authors should also provide a short bio (up to 20 lines).

UPDATE - CFP: ecloga (postgraduate journal)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 11:03am
University of Strathclyde

ecloga, a peer-refereed journal run by English Studies postgraduates at the University of Strathclyde, invites papers for the next issue. Established in 2001, ecloga has a growing reputation for publishing outstanding research by postgraduates and academics from Scotland, the UK and abroad.

For the next issue of ecloga we are interested in receiving papers on any topic from the broad field of English studies. Our aim in not providing a title or theme is to encourage a range of papers that reflects current research interests. We would also welcome submissions of creative writing.

Performing Knowledge-NEMLA 2011-April 7-10

updated: 
Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 6:11pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel invites papers that examine how literary texts perform knowledge, and how literature becomes an object of scholarly knowledge in a variety of disciplinary settings. Panelists might address literary representations of the cleric, the virtuoso, or the pedant; the use of scholarly paratexts (the gloss, the appendix, the footnote); or, more broadly, the influence of disciplinarity and professionalization on the literary text. Send abstracts to Sean Barry, sean.barry@rutgers.edu, and John Savarese, john.savarese@rutgers.edu.

Call for Proposals: Sessions, Panels, Papers on SEA LITERATURE, HISTORY & CULTURE

updated: 
Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 12:15pm
Stephen Curley, area chair Sea Literature, History & Culture / Popular Culture & American Culture Associations

PROPOSAL DEADLINE: December 15, 2010
National Popular Culture & American Culture Associations
2011 Conference, April 20-23, 2011, in San Antonio, Texas.

You may propose individual papers, special panels, or sessions organized around a sea-related theme. Sessions are scheduled in 1½ hour slots, with four papers or speakers each.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

►Film, art, music, and television
►Historical events
►Creative literature
►Sagas from western & non-western cultures
►Contemporary port operations, seafaring, & sailing

Poetry and Melancholia

updated: 
Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 10:11am
Department of English Studies, University of Stirling

CALL FOR PAPERS

Poetry and Melancholia, University of Stirling, 8-10 July 2011

Keynote speakers: Catherine Maxwell (Queen Mary, University of London), Don Paterson (Poet), and Susan J. Wolfson (Princeton University). Other speakers include John Drakakis (Stirling University), Lorna Hutson (University of St Andrews), Ron Levao (Rutgers University), Cornelia D. J. Pearsall (Smith College) and David G. Riede (Ohio State University)

Literary, Cultural, and Language Theories - journal collections

updated: 
Monday, August 16, 2010 - 8:15am
Faculty of Philology, Banja Luka

Filolog (The Philologist) is a peer reviewed scientific journal with the international Editorial Board.

We are looking for papers dealing with contemporary literary, cultural, and language theories and/or their applications to singular works. We also encourage papers dealing with meta-theory and its significance for human and social sciences.

Literary, Cultural, and Language Theories - journal collections

updated: 
Monday, August 16, 2010 - 8:14am
Faculty of Philology, Banja Luka

Filolog (The Philologist) is a peer reviewed scientific journal with the international Editorial Board.

We are looking for papers dealing with contemporary literary, cultural, and language theories and/or their applications to singular works. We also encourage papers dealing with meta-theory and its significance for human and social sciences.

CFP: Children in Film

updated: 
Sunday, August 15, 2010 - 4:36pm
SWTXPCA/ACA Joint Conference April 20-23, 2011

Proposals are now being accepted for the Children in Film Area of the 31st annual PCA/ACA & SWTX PCA/ACA joint conference April 20-23, 2011, in San Antonio, TX.(www.swtxpca.org). Proposals are sought that explore and interrogate the representations of children in Hollywood film, independent film, foreign film and/or children's film.

42nd College English Association Conference: March 31 - April 2, 2011, St. Petersburg, Florida

updated: 
Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 10:42pm
College English Association

Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida

"Henceforth I ask not good-fortune, I myself am good-fortune."
-- Walt Whitman, "Song of the Open Road"

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at www.cea-web.org

Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal.

[UPDATE] Prove It On Me: Ambivalent Lesbian Representation in the Harlem Renaissance (30 Sept. 2010, NEMLA 7-10 Apr. 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 5:46pm
Phillip Zapkin / NEMLA

The Harlem Renaissance tried to fill socially-constructed absences in African-Americans' group identity (such as humanity, art, masculinity, morality) by creating a respectable black middle class. Bourgeois imperatives complicated middle class queer existence by enforcing heteronormativity, in contrast to working class Harlem's more open relationship to sexual expression. This panel explores representations, direct or ambivalent, of African-American lesbian desire and resistance in the arts, music, and literature of the Harlem Renaissance and the contemporary queer renaissance.

Edited Collection: Vibratory Modernism (abstract deadline 10/1/2010)

updated: 
Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 8:46am
Anthony Enns, Department of English, Dalhousie University

Vibrations played a central role in nineteenth-century science, as light, heat, energy, and matter were all gradually understood to be essentially vibratory. This new understanding of the universe as being purely composed of vibrations had a tremendous impact on all aspects of the arts in the first half of the twentieth century, as they introduced new aesthetic possibilities that promised to transform the way art was made and viewed. In the visual arts, for example, movements like Futurism and Vorticism conceived of invisible fields of energy that could be tapped into to create new forms of art.

Nineteenth Century British Literature - October 30 Deadline

updated: 
Friday, August 13, 2010 - 6:21pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Volume 2, Issue 2

The peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Literary Journal is now accepting essays, book reviews, short stories, poetry and interviews from academics across the world for our fourth issue of the Pennsylvania Literary Journal, "Nineteenth Century British Literature," which will be published in January 2011 with Amazon CreateSpace. The page size is 8.5 X 5.5 inches, 12-point font, Times New Roman, MLA-style end-notes and Works Cited listings. The third issue of PLJ, "New and Old Historical Perspectives on Literature," is now on sale through Amazon, CreateSpace and other distribution channels.

Journal Call for submissions: Deadline 1/2/10

updated: 
Friday, August 13, 2010 - 12:30pm
Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Cultural Diversity

Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Cultural Diversity, a national journal published by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education and the Frederick Douglass Institute Collaborative, welcomes the submission of academic essays from any discipline, poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, book reviews and original artwork (we print in black and white) that explore cultural diversity issues for our Spring 2011 issue. The deadline for this "general topic" issue is December 1, 2010. See our website at http://organizations.bloomu.edu/connect/ for more information about the journal and for recent issues.

Poetic Devices & Narrative Dynamics: Call For Panel Submissions

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 8:23pm
International Society for the Study of Narrative Conference 2011

Below is a call for submissions to a proposed panel at the 2011 ISSN Conference.

Professor Brian McHale (Ohio State University) has generously agreed to moderate the panel if it is selected for inclusion in the conference. If you are interested, please send a 250-word abstract, paper title, and 100-word bio to lgleich@umd.edu by October 1st.

Panel Title: Poetic Devices and Narrative Dynamics

Multiple Childhoods/Multidisciplinary Perspectives: Interrogating Normativity in Childhood Studies

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 4:31pm
Department of Childhood Studies, Rutgers University-Camden

We invite submissions for participation in a conference hosted by the Department of Childhood Studies of Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey, USA on Multiple Childhoods/ Multidisciplinary Perspectives. As a field, childhood studies has flourished in large part because scholars have recognized the necessity of moving between and beyond traditional academic disciplines and have resisted the idea that there exists one, normative version of childhood common to all.

Medievalist Fantasies of Christendom: The Medieval as a Christian Apologetic in the Inklings (Kalamazoo 2011; 9/15)

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 3:59pm
Cory Lowell Grewell

Papers in this panel will analyze in detail how medieval imagery and literary technique is used as Christian apologetic in the works of the Inklings. Papers should go beyond a simple notation of the usage of medieval imagery as apologetic, e.g. the medievalism of Lewis's Narnia Chronicles, and explore how the medieval imagery results in a Christian polemic and of what kind. Under this broad umbrella, there are several questions that might be explored, which might be important to a better understanding of the medievalisms of the Inklings: How authentic is the usage of the medieval in any given work or author to the Middle Ages, and what bearing does this authenticity have on the author's implicit or explicit apologetic stance?

Edited Collection -- Eugene O'Neill's One Act Plays (1/1/11 & 7/1/11)

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 3:29pm
Michael Y. Bennett, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater & Benjamin D. Carson, Bridgewater State College

CFP

Eugene O'Neill's One-Act Plays

Editors: Michael Y. Bennett and Benjamin D. Carson

Although Eugene O'Neill's work has generated much scholarship, his one-act plays have not received the critical attention they deserve. Given that O'Neill began his career writing one-act plays, including his justly famous "Sea Plays," associated with the Provincetown Players, it is surprising that his one-acts have been largely neglected. This current collection aims to fill the gap by examining O'Neill's one-act plays, during what can be considered O'Neill's formative writing years, and the formative period of American drama.

"Rebecca West and Power," the fifth biennial conference on Rebecca West

updated: 
Thursday, August 12, 2010 - 3:13pm
International Rebecca West Society

September 16-17, 2011, at Baruch College, New York

The main focus of this conference will be the journalism of Rebecca West. We invite papers that analyze any aspect of West's journalistic oeuvre, but encourage especially contributions that investigate the idea of power-state power, patriarchal power, empire, God, and literary authorities. Any approach, including rhetorical analysis, political history, ideological critique, feminism, biography, and intertextuality are welcome. We also plan to organize at least one panel on approaches to the new collection of West's non-fiction prose The Essential Rebecca West (2010). Papers on other topics will also be considered, especially those exploring the nexus between West's fiction and non-fiction.

'Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance' Conference, University of Sydney, 10-12 February 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 8:04pm
Romantic Studies Association of Australasia

This is the first of the biennial conferences planned for the newly founded Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA), to take place at the University of Sydney from Thursday to Saturday, 10-12 February 2011.

Plenary speakers:

James Chandler (Chicago)
Deirdre Coleman (Melbourne)
Nicholas Roe (St Andrews)

Panel discussion with the assembled editors of 'The Oxford Companion To The Romantic Age' (1999):

Iain McCalman (Sydney)
Jon Mee (Warwickshire)
Gillian Russell (ANU)
Clara Tuite (Melbourne)

We invite submissions covering the full range of possible meanings of "distance" in Romantic studies – including (but not limited to)

INTERSECTIONS: Literature, History & Art/ Science & Technology March 24-25, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 1:52pm
McCleary Interdisciplinary Symposium, Texas Southern University

The Department of English at Texas Southern University will host the Thirteenth Annual Interdisciplinary McCleary Symposium, March 24-25, 2011, Houston, Texas.

The general topic for the conference encompasses "Intersections: Literature, History & Art/Science & Technology."

The Tenth Annual Wenshan International Conference: The City and Literature: A Geography of Culture and Space

updated: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 3:39am
English Department, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan

The reciprocal relationship of literature and the city reveals a complexity of urban life that has given rise to literary imagery and themes that define our understanding of the city. Novelists and poets contrast ideal cities with earthly cities, culture with nature, the mechanical with the organic, and the city with nature. These writers embrace our ambivalence toward the city that captivates but threatens, excites but intimidates, showing us the potential for greatness along with the fear of failure.

Theories of Life in the 20th and 21st Centuries - Rutgers University - February 26, 2011

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 1:09pm
Rutgers English 20th Century Group
    Theories of Life in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Interdisciplinary Humanities Conference

Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Saturday, February 26, 2011

Plenary Speaker: Donna V. Jones, UC Berkeley English, author of The Racial Discourses of Life Philosophy: Négritude, Vitalism and Modernity. Columbia University Press, 2010.

Sponsored by: Rutgers English Department 20th Century Group, Rutgers Women and Gender Studies Department, the Institute for Research on Women.

[UPDATE] House and Home in 20th Century American Film and Literature (conference 4/2011; abstract due 9/30/2010)

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 12:53pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

From Blanche Dubois' Belle Reve to Esperanza Cordero's house on Mango Street, houses—and the affiliated, if more abstract, idea of home—figure prominently in 20th century American literature and film. The 20th century, after all, is characterized by both inter- and intra-national migrations which have, invariably, entailed the loss of one home, followed by the acquisition of another. Moreover, the 20th century has seen a steady increase in both actual home ownership and the imaginative importance of owning a home. At the start of the 20th century, 46.5% of Americans—less than one in two—were homeowners but, by 2000, that number had risen to 66.2%, or two in three.

The Relationship Between Music and Literary Works by Langston Hughes (4/6-9/11)

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 12:35pm
The Langston Hughes Society

The Langston Hughes Society
Panel: The Relationship Between Music and Literary Works by Langston Hughes
2011 College Language Association Convention
Host: the University of South Carolina, Upstate in Spartanburg, South Carolina
Host Hotel: The Spartanburg Marriott Hotel at Renaissance Park in Spartanburg, SC
Conference Dates: April 6-9, 2011

Memory and Collective Identity in Comparative Literature and Others

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 5:06am
452ºF Journal of Comparative Literature

On July 31st 2010, we start the CFP for the fourth issue of 452ºF Journal
of Literary Theory and Comparative Literature.This CFP is open and
addressed to anyone that wishes to and that holds at least a BA degree.

The bidding terms, which are exposed below and that regulate the reception
and publication of the different articles are subject to the content of
the Peer review System, the Style-sheet and the Legal Notice. These can be
consulted in the Procedures area of the web page.

Cases and their Publics: Interdisciplinary and Transnational Perspectives on the Case Study Genre 26-28 Sept 2011

updated: 
Sunday, August 8, 2010 - 8:21pm
The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Australia

The interdisciplinary and transnational character of the case study genre has proved of enduring interest to all Western societies, particularly in relation to questions of the sexed self, sexual subjectivity and sexual pathologies.

This workshop will investigate the case study genre and its relationship to different publics and audiences, from patients to social reformers, from moral crusaders to literary audiences.

We are interested not only in how case studies were used to communicate the findings of individual researchers to other members of their academic disciplines - and beyond that, to broader publics - but also in how in turn case studies were used by a range of publics and audiences to refute and dispute academic knowledge.

CFP: From Here to There and Back Again: Allusion, Adaptation and Appropriation

updated: 
Saturday, August 7, 2010 - 8:27pm
EGO - The English Graduate Organization

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From Here to There and Back Again: Allusion, Adaptation and Appropriation
2010 University of Florida Graduate Conference
October 21-22
Gainesville, FL

Keynote Speaker: Douglas Lanier, University of New Hampshire. Author of Shakespeare and Modern Popular Culture (2002)

Samuel Beckett: Out of the Archive - International Conference, June 23-26, 2011

updated: 
Friday, August 6, 2010 - 5:53am
University of York, UK

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Samuel Beckett: Out of the Archive

International Conference, University of York, June 23-26, 2011

"My texts are in a terrible mess."

In the wake of his 2006 centenary, Samuel Beckett's prestige has continued to grow. His work has a continuing resonance in the public sphere, as the recent high-profile publication of the first volume of his letters shows, and the field of Beckett studies remains central to developments in the understanding of modernism. Beckett's oeuvre is also celebrated for its transcendence of specific cultural and historical contexts, a situation that appears to pull against his increasing historical importance.

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