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modernist studies

REMINDER: Modernism's World Languages

updated: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 10:40am
NeMLA 2018: Pittsburgh, PA (April 12-15)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

As Douglas Mao and Rebecca Walkowitz indicate in their article “The New Modernist Studies,” recent trends in modernist studies have operated a radical revision of the term “modernism,” moving away from the idea that modernism is confined to a single place (Europe, North America, and the West in general) or a single time (roughly 1890-1940). As the map of “transnational” and “global” modernisms expands, ever more attention has been given to new languages, phenomena of bilingualism and multilingualism, and translation as a fundamental practice in modernist writing (Yao, Rogers).

Always Periodize? Methods and Implications of Literary History (ACLA, March 29--April 1st, 2018)

updated: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 4:14pm
Ralph Clare, Boise State University; Matthew Mullins, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; Jeffrey Severs, University of British Columbia
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

In the very first issue of Comparative Literature René Wellek challenges A. O. Lovejoy’s insistence that the explanatory power of traditional periodization has been exhausted. In the pages of PMLA, Lovejoy had advocated that literary critics think in terms of “Romanticisms” in the plural rather than “Romanticism” in the singular. “I propose to show,” Wellek counters, “that there is no basis for this extreme nominalism, that the major romantic movements form a unity of theories, philosophies, and style, and that these, in turn, form a coherent group of ideas each of which implicates the other.” Nearly seventy years later, the question of periodization has become central to literary studies once again.

REMINDER: Special Issue CFP: Dadaism and Surrealism in America (DEADLINE 12/31/17)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 9:33pm
Janine Utell / The Space Between
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 31, 2017

CFP: Special Issue of The Space Between on Dada and Surrealism in America deadline for submissions: December 31, 2017 full name / name of organization: The Space Between: Literature and Culture 1914-1945 contact email: janine.utell@gmail.com 

Special Issue: Call for Essays

Dada and Surrealism: Transatlantic Aliens on American Shores, 1914 – 1945

 

deadline for submissions: December 31, 2017

ACLA 2018: Sounding Transnational Literature

updated: 
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 11:28am
American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

Sounding Transnational Literature

American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) Annual Meeting

March 29 – April 1, 2018, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

Co-organizer: Julie Cyzewski, Murray State University

Co-organizer: Lisa Hollenbach, Oklahoma State University

https://www.acla.org/seminar/sounding-transnational-literature

Periodizing the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

updated: 
Monday, August 28, 2017 - 12:48pm
ACLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 23, 2017

 ACLA 2018 | March 29-April 1 | UCLA This seminar invites papers on theories and practices of periodization in modern and contemporary literature. Participants are invited to share meditations, gambits, polemics, practicums, readings and responses relating to the shifting time-shapes of their fields. Are there certain subfields/approaches that are more or less bound by periodization? Does certain content necessitate or pressure a more active periodizing logic? Do certain objects seem to allow a periodizing quietism? Papers could address, for example, relationships between historicization and periodization, literary geographies and historical/cultural eras, or comparative method and literary time.

[SCMS 2018] Points in Space: Performance and the Moving Image

updated: 
Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 9:45am
Swagato Chakravorty / Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 27, 2017

Since the 1960s, marking a transition from a Friedian conception of artistic modernism to one turning around John Cage and his New York circle, performance art has forged a strong relationship to moving-image art writ large. Responding to technological developments across imaging, motion-capture, and virtual or augmented reality research, performance artists have created increasingly sophisticated works that defy ready classification.

Reminder: Considering Modernist Confusion (NeMLA 2018 Pittsburgh)

updated: 
Monday, August 21, 2017 - 10:52pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

This panel reflects on the place of confusion in British and American modernism. Confusion has not been traditionally considered a proper scholarly response to textual analysis; critics are supposed to interpret a text rather than allow themselves to experience its uncertainties. What happens when we explore the confusion we feel when reading not as something to be worked through, but as something to be worked with? Building on affect theorists’ work on how our feelings can influence the way we read, such as Eve Sedgwick’s reparative reading and Rita Felski’s reflective and post-critical reading, how can considering confusion change both our experience of reading and our critical practices?

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