modernist studies

RSS feed

Modernist Studies, Contemporary Problems (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 2:47pm
Alex Jones/Vanderbilt University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

In the past decade, modernist studies has been animated by the issue of periodization. As a concept, modernism has been projected backwards and forwards in space and time. Attempts to clarify the “when” of modernism have ultimately led modernist studies to the doorstep of contemporary. If we now have late modernism, metamodernism, and cosmodernism broaching the present, we also have arguments “against periodization” (Hayot), proposals for “literary transhistory” (Bronstein), and assertions that modernism is nothing more nor less than the “creative and expressive domain” of any modernity (Friedman). But what does it mean to propose the contemporaneity of modernism when modernism itself is being detached from time and history?

Marianne Moore and the Archives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 2:45pm
University of Buffalo
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

"Marianne Moore and the Archives"

The University at Buffalo

will host a conference on Marianne Moore

May 22-24, 2020

Call for proposals: 

"Marianne Moore and the Archives" will focus on Moore in relation to archival collection practices, broadly understood. 

We encourage proposals drawing on research collections at the Rosenbach or on the Marianne Moore Digital Archive but also proposals on Moore's appearance in other modernist archives, in relation to networks of her friends and peers, to current theories and practices of archiving, or on Moore herself as a librarian, a collector, and a self-archivist. 

ACLA 2020: Revisions of Fascism II: Comparative Fascisms

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 2:22pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

****This is a CFP for the 2020 ACLA Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, March 19-22, 2020.***

In The Anatomy of Fascism, Robert Paxton reminds us that fascism has always proved difficult to define. Fascism “seemed to come from nowhere.” Though it “took on multiple and varied forms” and “exalted hatred and violence in the name of national prowess,” it still “managed to appeal to prestigious and well-educated statesmen, entrepreneurs, professionals, artists, and intellectuals.” Despite this, “everyone is” nonetheless, “sure they know what fascism is.” 

Different Voices, Voicing Difference (NEMLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:22pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The question of the relation of language to voice traces back to Aristotle’s De interpretatione, with its definition of speech as the sign of thought, and writing the sign of speech. In Jacques Derrida’s account of this phonologocentric model, voice is the ligature of “phōnē and logos,” securing their essential proximity. But if voice is only a mediation, then, as Barbara Johnson writes, voice is no longer “self-identity but self-difference.” Paradoxically, the voice marks the singular but is itself plural, sweeping the self up into an ever-ramifying play of differentiation. As David Lawton proposes, “voice is both a signature, ‘I,’ singularity, and a clear marker of difference, ‘not I,’ multiplicity”.

Modernism and Disability Aesthetics

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:58am
Rafael Hernandez / American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Recent work in the field of disability studies by scholars like Ato Quayson (2007), Tobin Siebers (2010), Maren Linett (2016), and Suzannah Biernoff (2017) has considered modernism’s appropriation of disabled bodies. This seminar thus seeks to better understand the role of disability in modernist literary and visual aesthetics. In particular, we encourage papers that consider how writers and artists borrowed from, mimicked, or otherwise recast disability as uniquely modernist literary and artistic subjects. Secondly, this seminar is interested in the ways modernism was cast as disabled in varied attacks on its aesthetic projects.

CFP (REMINDER): "Post-Political Critique and Literary Studies" ACLA Seminar (Chicago, 19-22 March 2020) (Deadline: 23 September 2019)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:48am
Juan Meneses, UNC Charlotte
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

“Post-Political Critique and Literary Studies”

 

Call for Papers for ACLA 2020 Seminar (Chicago, 19-22 March 2020)

 

 

This seminar seeks papers that reflect on the analytical bridges that might exist between post- political theory and literary studies. The main question the seminar aims to answer is the following: Decades after everything was declared to be political, what are the affordances, triumphs, and pitfalls of a post-political theory of literature?

 

ACLA 2020: Comparative Socialisms and Literary Imagination Before the Age of Decolonization (Chicago, March 19-22)

updated: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019 - 10:46am
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

 

Inviting paper abstracts for a proposed session for the upcoming American Comparative Literature Association conference, to be held in Chicago, March 19-22, 2020. Submit abstracts by 9 a.m. EST on September 23, 2019, via the ACLA website: https://www.acla.org/comparative-socialisms-and-literary-imagination-age-decolonization

 

Comparative Socialisms and Literary Imagination Before the Age of Decolonization

NeMLA 2020: Afro-diasporic Futures Before Afrofuturism (Boston, March 5-8)

updated: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019 - 10:00am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Panel: Afro-diasporic Futures Before Afrofuturism

Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Conference

March 5-8, 2020 

Boston, MA

 

Seeking papers on the politics of futurity in Afro-diasporic writing from before the mid-twentieth century for the following guaranteed session at NeMLA 2020. Abstracts due by September 30 on NeMLA's website. Visit https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17890 to submit.

ACLA-Snapshots of the Past: Memory and Photography in Literature and Film (Sheraton Grand Hotel, Chicago, 3/19-3/22, 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 10:05am
The American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Following the success of previous ACLA seminars, “The Story of Memory: Remembering, Forgetting, and Unreliable Narrators” and “The Story of Remembrance: The Future of Memory and Memories of the Future” in 2018 & 2019, this seminar invites paper proposals to discuss the relationship between memory and photography and its representation in literature and film.

 

ALA 2020: Carson McCullers Society Panel

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 1:37pm
Carson McCullers Society
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, January 12, 2019

The Carson McCullers Society is pleased to announce an open call for panel papers on any topic related to the life and works of Carson McCullers for one of two guaranteed panels at the American Literature Association (ALA) conference in San Diego, California, on May 21-24, 2020. Papers that approach McCullers’ works from interdisciplinary, comparative, and disability or gender studies perspectives are especially sought; however, all topics will be considered.

PCA/ACA Pulp Studes

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:46pm
Jason Ray Carney / Christopher Newport University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Pulp magazines were a series of mostly English-language, predominantly American, magazines printed on rough pulp paper. They were often illustrated with highly stylized, full-page cover art and numerous line art illustrations of the fictional content. They were sold at a price the working classes could afford, though they were popular with all classes, including president Woodrow Wilson. The earlier magazines, such as All-Story, were general fiction magazines, though later they diversified and helped solidify many of the genres we are familiar with today, including western, detective, science fiction, fantasy, horror, romance and sports fiction.

Agamben and Literature (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 3:44pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Giorgio Agamben is one of the most compelling contemporary theorists of literature. Yet despite ever intensifying interest in Agamben’s work, his studies of literature and poetics remain a less explored dimension of his corpus. This seminar seeks spirited contributions that engage with Agamben’s reflections on literary texts, as well as those mobilising the concepts and interests of his aesthetics into new readings. Papers addressing the connections between literature and other aspects of Agamben’s thought (such as sovereignty and biopolitics) are welcome, as are explorations of his writing’s intellectual and historical contexts – including its affinities with the work of thinkers such as Benjamin, Blanchot, Foucault, Derrida, de Man and Hamacher.

ACLA Panel - Lost in the Archive: Writing and Self-Effacement in Bureaucratic Subjectivities

updated: 
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 3:41pm
Alexandra Irimia / Western University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Clerks, bureaucrats, copyists, scriveners, archivists, bookkeepers – they are, along with the repositories of written facts they work and sometimes live in, organs of the greater corpus of the archive. This human machinery of archons (Derrida) is hidden in full display, at once peripheral and essential to the archive, managing its material flows, embodying the Law, maintaining and guarding the archive’s very possibility of existence.

Writing without Writing: Fragments and Survivance

updated: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2019 - 5:23pm
ACLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Since the nineteenth century to the present, fragmentary writing has been widely deployed in literature and philosophy (i.e. Ernst Bloch, Schlegel, Mallarmé, Adorno, Maurice Blanchot, Kafka, Beckett etc.) as a strategy to disrupt the idea of totality by and through writing. Fragmentary writing as an incomplete totality, bears absent voices and traces and alludes to a whole.

Writing a Cosmos: European Literature and Popular Astronomy, 1890-1950 (CfP)

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:19am
Christoph Richter
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

By the turn of the twentieth century, the ‘new astronomy’ had developed into a proper scientific discipline, with its own sets of instruments, its own journals, its own jargon, and its own interpretative authority. With the acceleration of new discoveries and insights into stellar phenomena, the emerging mass media ensured that this astronomical knowledge fascinated an even wider audience in the late 19th and early 20th century. At the same time, literature across Europe responded to the fascinating astronomical developments in a variety of modes, styles, and genres.

Brandeis Novel Symposium 2020: Willa Cather, Settler colonialism, indigeneity

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:11am
John Plotz/ Brandeis Novel Symposium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

CFP: Brandeis Novel Symposium

Friday April 24, 2020

Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

 

Deadline for submissions: November 1, 2019 

The fourth annual Brandeis Novel Symposium examines the genre’s relation to issues of settler colonialism, land, and indigeneity. The focal text is Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House (1925). As in previous years, we invite papers that explore these larger questions from diverse theoretical, historical and formal angles, taking Cather’s novel either as focus or simply as a point of departure.

Literature and Event: Reformulations of the Literary in the 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, August 28, 2019 - 4:23am
University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 10, 2019

Literature and Event: Reformulations of the Literary in the 21st Century

Humanities Research Centre, University of Warwick

Saturday 15th February 2020

Keynote: ProfDerek Attridge (York); Prof. Esther Leslie (Birkbeck) 


 

Projective Verse at 70: Theoretical and Poetic Influences

updated: 
Saturday, August 24, 2019 - 4:07pm
The Charles Olson Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 6, 2019

The Charles Olson Society will sponsor a panel at the annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, to be held at the University of Louisville from February 20-22. 2020 marks the 70th anniversary of this important essay, and the panel will therefore examine the essay’s theoretical and poetic legacies. We are interested in abstracts proposing innovative approaches to reading Olson’s essay and the conversations that it started. How have the theoretical or cultural contexts surrounding projective verse created a robust understanding of poetic practice in the post-1945 era? How have the legacies of projective poetry engaged with and inflected theoretical models?

NeMLA 2020: Literature, New Media and Perception (Panel)

updated: 
Thursday, August 22, 2019 - 11:31am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

With the invention of photography in the mid-19th century, reality no longer depended on the autonomous interpretation of the subject's view, but was instead objectively perceived and recognizable. Contrary to painting, photography fueled changes in perception and perceived reality by realistically reproducing the object as it exists. Now, the 21st century stands under the aegis of the image, a culture dominated by pictures, visual simulations, illusions, copies, and reproductions—creating an inflection point where visual paradigms compete with and even threaten traditional practices.

[NeMLA 2020] Detecting the Margins: New Perspectives on the Critical History of Detective Fiction (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - 2:10pm
Mollie Eisenberg, Princeton University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since its emergence from the periodical press into the first mass-market novelistic craze, detective fiction has occupied a liminal position in the margins of aesthetic legitimacy—and critical study. Detection is a popular genre, a “literature of escape,” that nevertheless seems to make a claim to, and find purchase in, more rarefied aesthetic and intellectual precincts. Michael Holquist styles detection as a guilty pleasure of the reading classes: “The same people who spent their days with James Joyce were reading Agatha Christie at night.” This panel asks what that liminal position might show us about both the genre and the conditions—theoretical, professional, material—of its study. 

“No Kind of Place”: Location, Migration, and Imagination

updated: 
Monday, August 19, 2019 - 11:21am
The International Flannery O’Connor Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, February 1, 2020

“No Kind of Place”: Location, Migration, and Imagination
The International Flannery O’Connor Conference

St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto, Canada,

June 18-21, 2020

Call for Papers

9/11 and Its Aftermath in the New Millennium

updated: 
Monday, August 19, 2019 - 11:07am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA, Boston, MA. March 5-8

In a 2011 Economist Prospero blog entitled "After the Unthinkable," the effects of 9/11 on literature was compared to those of World War II in that it "will continue to be a marking point." As we approach the twentieth anniversary of September 11, 2001, this panel seeks to move beyond representations of the day itself to explore the various nuances of post-9/11 literature by looking at how the long political and cultural aftermath have left their mark on literary and visual culture. 

“Paper Kaleidoscopes”: The Cycles of Modernism

updated: 
Friday, August 16, 2019 - 11:07am
The International Lawrence Durrell Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 9, 2019

The International Lawrence Durrell Society requests proposals for 20-minute presentations on fictional, dramatic, or poetic cycles from the modernist era. Such cycles may include explicit trilogies (tetralogies, etc.) or works connected in more implicit ways. Potential subjects include:

 

 

International Congress of Fantastic Genre, Audiovisuals and New Technologies

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 12:05pm
Elche International Fantastic Film Festival – FANTAELX
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 7, 2019

The International Congress of Fantastic Genre, Audiovisuals and New Technologies is an activity of scientific and academic divulgation that is part of Elche International Fantastic Film Festival – FANTAELX, and which has the collaboration of the Miguel Hernández University (Spain).

Its mission is to transmit research studies in all the different thematic lines of the Fantastic Genre, covering all its possible variants and platforms: cinema, television, theater, literature, comics, videogames, virtual reality, etc.

 

WAYS OF PARTICIPATION:

 

OPTION 1:

Open Session on the Neoavanguardia, the Novissimi, the neosperimentali, et alii. (Panel in Italian Language and Literature)

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 12:01pm
NeMLA, Boston, Copley Place (5-8 March 2020)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

As Maria Corti has written, the strength of all artistic avant-gardes may be found in their “foolish squandering of the past” and of how literature plays host, in precise historical moments, to writers who consider their role irreconcilable with those who preceded them; who believe it is their destiny to live among the gravestones of tradition; and believe they are engaged, in “incandescent conversation,” with the future. The panel invites participants to debate the enduring contributions of the Italian neo-avantgarde against the background of social and political upheaval that characterized Italy in the 1960s.

Reading in Theory (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:29am
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Reading in Theory

 

Pages