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Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy CFP: Nov. 15, 2018

updated: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 10:27am
The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy
General Issue

 

Issue Editors:
Luke Waltzer, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Lisa Brundage, Macaulay Honors College, CUNY

Editorial Associate:
Teresa Ober, The Graduate Center, CUNY

 

World Literature Pedagogical Spaces: Weltliteratur, Untranslatables, and Praxis

updated: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 10:30am
ACLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

World literature has a tremendous capacity to broaden literary canons, but, when taught without a focus on translation, can succumb to cultural deracination, philological bankruptcy, and “the worst tendencies of capitalism” (Damrosch and Spivak 456). The World Literature Pedagogical Spaces seminar addresses these concerns by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and teachers in literary studies, comparative literature, and translation. This roundtable’s goal is to diversify and exchange ideas on world literature in theory and practice, while developing sensitivity to translation in cross-cultural literary study and giving equal attention to scholarship, pedagogy, and praxis.

Romantic Manuscripts NeMLA; Washington, D.C. 3/21-24/2019

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Digital archives like the William Blake Archive and Early English Books Online (EEBO) have made manuscript materials that may have been difficult to access in the past more readily available.  This roundtable seeks brief presentations on the use of manuscript materials pertaining to the British Romantic period in teaching, research and publications -- what have been your successes, what difficulties have you and/or your students faced, etc.

E21: Presentivism in the Eighteenth-Century Studies Classroom

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:55am
Dr. Cynthia Richards/ ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 15, 2018

E21: Presentivism in the Eighteenth-Century Studies Classroom

In its manifesto, the V21 Collective asserts that “Victorian Studies has fallen prey to positivist historicism: a mode of inquiry that aims to do little more than exhaustively describe, preserve, and display the past” and advocates for “a new openness to presentism: an awareness that our interest in the period is motivated by certain features of our own moment.” At the 2018 ASECS, the same question was asked of eighteenth-century studies: as a discipline, have we “fallen prey to positivist historicism,” and would it benefit us to be open to presentism? Do we need our own V21, or E21?

Thinking through the Child Protagonist: Films for Critical Thinking and Creativity

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:37am
Ericka Knudson (Harvard University) NeMLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In today’s global society, understanding different cultures as we interact and construct our beliefs and identities has never been more important. As educators, our responsibility to guide students in developing critical thinking in their consumption of visual media is crucial to their ability to appreciate different perspectives. While teachers may recognize intuitively the power of film to expose students to other languages and cultures, examining the benefits of using it to develop students’ creativity and analytical skills can help maximize its effectiveness in the classroom.

World Literature and the Internationalization of Nationalism

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 10:04am
ACLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

The resurgence in the early 2000s of “World Literature” as a theoretical framework and institutional practice was coeval with another capacious category also prominent in the debates of those years: globalization.

The Visible Cities': Teaching Language and Culture through the City

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:26am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Most language teachers think that cities, in all their aspects, are an important and rich resource for the language classroom. The study of a city, what we can see in a movie or read in a literary work, exposes students to authentic language and offers plenty of material to be integrated in the classroom. Cities are privileged windows through which students have the opportunity to address historical, political, artistic and social issues. Moreover, there are many elements inside the city that have the potential of making students aware of the importance of intercultural proficiency and can stimulate their interest in the culture of the target language. 

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