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pedagogy

Is There A Working Class In This Literature Class?

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 2:43pm
Dan Bender/neMLA 2017 Baltimore
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

While labor economics and political theory regularly engage the phenomenon of class conflict, literary study often glosses over it. This roundtable seeks to resuscitate the vexed question of class-bias in the academy, as reflected in the absence of or meager attention given to literary representations of working class consciousness. Papers drawing from any literary chronology and any genres are welcome.  The purpose of this roundtable is  first to explore the marginalization of working class life but then to  propose a remedy. How can literary studies acquire cross-class agency, recognizing  working class subjectivity within a traditional literary canon?  This will be the roundtable's culminating question for presenters and attendees.

CFP Nemla Baltimore 23-26 March 2017: Fostering Global Competence Through Film

updated: 
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 - 8:07pm
Patrizia Comello Perry / Borough of Manhattan Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Nemla Baltimore March 23-26 2017

Call For Abstracts: Fostering Global Competence Through Film: Reimagining the Foreign Culture and Language Class

 

Dear Colleagues, 

Please consider submitting an abstract for the proposed session below to be held at the NeMLA Convention in Baltimore, March 23-26, 2017.

An August Occasion: National Conference on the Life and Legacy of August Wilson

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 9:34am
Dr. Sandra G. Shannon/ August Wilson Society of Howard University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 8, 2016

The onset of autumn is a solemn reminder that the world lost August Wilson in October 2005.  It is also the harvest season--a time for taking stock of his life's work and for promoting new ways of analyzing, teaching, discussing, researching, and, ultimately, safeguarding the rich legacy that he bequeathed to us.

This much-anticipated AUGUST OCCASION and celebration, which also marks the August Wilson Society's 10th Anniversary, will feature an array of panels, roundtables, workshops, creative works, and performance pieces that test new theories and that introduce novel approaches to Wilson's art, his activism, and yet-undiscovered meaning in his ten-play American Century Cycle.

Baltimore and the Emergence of the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 3:31pm
Lena Ampadu/Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Baltimore, Maryland, has been the home of several important African American authors, including Frederick Douglass and Frances E. W. Harper.  In addition to these major writers who influenced the emergence of African American protest literature of the tumultuous nineteenth century, there are several other significant writers of prose and poetry who have lived in the city and created African American literature. Notable examples include Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Waters Turpin, Eugenia Collier, and Lucille Clifton.

Experience and Education: Pragmatism in the English Studies Classroom - Panel @ NeMLA 2017

updated: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 8:33am
Matthew Overstreet / University of Pittsburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel seeks to bring together teacher-scholars who utilize the philosophical tradition of American Pragmatism in teaching literature, writing, digital media, cultural studies or rhetoric and composition.

This includes those who teach the work of William James, John Dewey and their progeny directly, and those who use pragmatist thought to inform broader pedagogical or theoretical projects.  Whether interested in the semiotics of C.S. Peirce, the neo-pragmatism of Richard Rorty or Stanley Fish, the “prophetic pragmatism” of Cornel West, or any other branch of the pragmatist tradition, all are welcome.

(Update) Axxed: Public Censorship and the Academy (NeMLA, March 23-26, 2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 - 12:30pm
Angela Ridinger-Dotterman, Queensborough Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Resistance to the censorship of speech or publications by governmental or institutional authority has long been regarded as central to the defense of academic freedom. The hypervisibility and hyperconnectivity resulting from social media and the 24-hour news cycle have made possible the suppression and/or marginalization of unpopular ideas and texts through public shaming and/or boycotting. While on the one hand, this kind of public censorship embodies the total realization of freedom of expression, at the same time, it serves to squelch unpopular ideas and texts.

A More Stable Stance: Privileging the Working Class in the Academy

updated: 
Monday, June 13, 2016 - 10:14am
Katelynn DeLuca/ Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

What does it mean to be working class? How do languages spoken, values held, and cultural representations vary given one’s class position? Though 62% of the country is working class (Zweig), the answers to these questions are left largely unclear and unspoken. Among others, these questions will be addressed via reflection and exploration from individuals from the working class, or who many call “working-class academics.”

Disclosing Class: Pedagogy and the Working Class

updated: 
Monday, June 13, 2016 - 10:14am
Katelynn DeLuca/Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Researcher and social activist Jean Anyon, in her investigations of social class reproduction in education, suggests "there is a ‘hidden curriculum’ in school work that has profound implication for theory—and practice—in education” (“Social Class” 67). By making class unhidden in the curriculum, students no longer feel they must "hide" themselves, and allows faculty to foster more honest conversations and writing about such issues.

Writing Beyond the Language Requirement

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2016 - 8:50pm
Kristen M. Turpin, Villanova University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

NeMLA 2017 in Baltimore, MD

March 23-26

Writing Beyond the Language Requirement 

Recently, scholars have recognized that “L2 writing is not only an ability to acquire, teach, and assess—as is conventionally assumed—but L2 writing is also a means, context, and basis for learning, both of language and of writing” (Manchón, 2011, x). That is, second language writing involves both learning to write and writing to learn. What does this mean for our curricula?

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