pedagogy

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How Do I Learn What They Don’t Teach?: Critical Supplements to Graduate-School Curricula (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:40pm
Dana Gavin/Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA 2021) Graduate Student Caucus
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Building off GSC’s successful 2019 session, “Bridging the Praxis Gap,” which largely addressed pedagogical issues, this session aims to address an even wider variety of gaps in what is taught in graduate school and the critical skills needed to survive in academia and professional life beyond. We are particularly interested in ways to bridge traditional notions of graduate school with active leadership training frameworks that seek to develop engaged graduate students who could take the reins and influence positive change in various contexts in and out of academia.

Sprache - Literatur - Kultur^language - literature - culture

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:38pm
German Journal - Sprache - Literatur - Kultur
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

We are accepting submissions for academic research on anything "German" - be it a cultural issue, a literary analysis, or linguistic research on how to learn German, and more. We are an interdisciplinary journal and are looking to combine various topics in our publications. We publish in English and German and are looking for a word count of no more than 10.000 words. Submit your paper here https://dc.cod.edu/gj/, or click https://dc.cod.edu/gj/ for more information.

NeMLA 2021 Roundtable: Literature, Rhetoric, and Technology: Fostering Innovation in Theory and in Practice

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

NeMLA 2021: Philadelphia, PA. March 11-14, 2021

As we move forward in this new normal, there is an urgent need, at both national and global levels, for critical investigations into the humanistic, scientific, and social scientific impacts of the coronavirus, both societally and in academia. It’s possible, likely even, that your current research and teaching focuses are not directly related to epidemiology. Regardless, your research and/or teaching has undoubtedly been affected by the pandemic. Now is a key moment to lean into the many robust opportunities for teaching developments and enhancements.

Teaching and Pedagogy During Crisis: A Roundtable Discussion for the 35th International Conference on Medievalism (“Impossible Playtimes,” 12-14 November 2020, Old Dominion University)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
The Year's Work in Medievalism
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 1, 2020

The COVID-19 pivot from face to face to remote or digital instruction affected every teacher and student across the world. This roundtable invites participants to reflect and discuss teaching in the current moment, as well as during the unplanned (February-April) 2020 pivot. 

Pulp Fiction, with Real Pulp: Crime Writing as Creative Writing

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In the 1930s and ‘40s, crime fiction was often published on cheap paper made of wood pulp, and this reputation as faintly disreputable has stayed with it, pursuing it into creative writing classes in which “genre-writing” has traditionally been discouraged. This panel invites creative writers as well as literary scholars to consider crime writing—true crime, mystery and detective fiction, suspense fiction, and film or television drama—in the context of creative writing pedagogy. Is crime writing inherently disreputable? Does this genre have a place in the creative writing classroom?

Creative Writing in the Age of the Pandemic

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While it is too soon to fully assess the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will stand as a watershed in global human life, creative writers as canaries in the cultural coalmine will be among the first to try to render it comprehensible and are already responding to the seismic shifts. The unexpected changes the pandemic has created have altered all of the processes that sustain human life, the social practices and interactions that are the mainstay of poetry, fiction, and drama, perhaps permanently. Enforced social isolation has caused people from all strata of society to contemplate what it means to be engaged in human culture while at the same time facing the possibility of sudden and random mortality, even mass extinction.

The Grad Student’s Guide to Intersectionality in the University (Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While universities have long been a space for cultivating generations of academics, researchers, and intellectuals, they have never been exempt from the dynamics of power that underlie any institution based on interpersonal relations. Recent strides at improving inclusivity—for example: greater diversity among faculty and student populations, or increasing numbers of sociopolitically- and culturally-cognizant programs—belie the reality that universities operate along ideological lines that can (re)produce inequities and social hierarchies.

Trans Media Pedagogy

updated: 
Sunday, June 21, 2020 - 11:26am
Dr. Dan Vena/ Carleton University, Queen's University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

“Trans Media Pedagogy” 

Journal of Cinema and Media Studies Teaching Dossier section

Edited by Dr. Dan Vena (Carleton University/ Queen’s University) and Dr. Nael Bhanji (Trent University) 

 

Optimizing Diverse Realities of Study Abroad Experiences

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:55am
Brendan W. Spinelli/North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Study abroad is frequently imagined as a transformative endeavor during a student’s university experience. Students often begin their studies with a tentative roadmap of courses guided by their future career goals, and, if the stars align, they will study abroad in their third or fourth year. Studying abroad is often encouraged in foreign language programs, but is traditionally framed as a parallel experience to their at-home semester. While of course the linguistic, cultural, intellectual and personal benefits of this experience have always been recognized to be invaluable, the long-lasting impact of the study abroad path is often not fully optimized.

Teaching with Images in Composition Courses

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:53am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

NeMLA 2021 Conference, Philadelphia, PA

Climate Change: Activating the Humanities through Service Learning

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:52am
Cynthia S. Williams/NeMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This roundtable at NeMLA (Northeast MLA, Philadelphia 2021) will explore humanities courses that incorporate service learning as a way to respond to climate change. Given the exigency of global warming and the stress it places on our local communities, it becomes increasingly vital to leverage the humanities through focused civic engagement.

S-E-X (A Collective Documentary Drama)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 2:40pm
Catalina Florescu Pace U
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 31, 2020

This is a call for proposals for people who want to talk about sex from their own perspective. Once the deadline ends (12/31/20), I will select 6-7 proposals and, along with their authors, continue to develop a play about sex that will have a staged reading in New York as well as be used as script where I teach. Furthermore, this play will be offered to drama therapists and/or sex educators to be workshopped with their clients and/or students. 

The play will be developed based on a series of questions that I will share with those selected at a later date. I am ONLY interested in personal accounts that help advance a mature and uninhibited talk about sex

ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 2b: Social Justice Practices for Educational Theatre

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:48am
NYU Steinhardt
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

As of this writing, we find ourselves about ten days into international protests following the murder of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Protesters the world over have made specific calls to action: acknowledge that black lives matter, educate yourself about social and racial injustice, and change the legal system that allows these heinous acts to go unpunished. In thinking through how we in the field of educational theatre can proactively address these needs, I reminded myself that there are many artists and educators who are already deeply engaged in this work.

ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 2a: Educational Theatre in the Time of COVID-19

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:47am
NYU Steinhardt
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

From the time government agencies and the press reported the emergence of a novel corona virus in late 2019, there has been a fundamental shift in the way we congregate, communicate, and educate across the world. Artists and educators have been called upon to reinvent their practice seemingly overnight. While we struggle to balance our personal health and wellness, our community contributions remain as vital as ever. In tribute to this reinvention, ArtsPraxis invites you to share your scholarship, practice, and praxis. As we’ve asked before, we welcome teachers, drama therapists, applied theatre practitioners, theatre-makers, performance artists, and scholars to offer vocabularies, ideas, strategies, practices, measures, and outcomes.

Critical Approaches to Tradition and Innovation in Graduate Humanities Education

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:46am
Jo Grim and Sam Sorensen/ Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Submissions Information: We seek papers for a panel titled "Critical Approaches to Tradition and Innovation in Graduate Humanities Education" to be held at the Northeast Modern Language Association's 52nd annual convention in Philadelphia, PA, March 11-14, 2021. Please submit abstracts of 300 words here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18735. For questions or concerns, please contact Jo Grim at jcg314@lehigh.edu or Sam Sorensen at sms416@lehigh.edu. We look forward to reviewing your proposals!  

Making Lit Lit: Forging Connections Between Student Experiences and Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:19am
Chris Jacobs
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This panel at the 2021 NeMLA convention in Philadelphia, "Making Lit Lit: Forging Connections Between Student Experiences and Literature," will consider how to apply current pedagogical best practices to make literature and culture classes more relevant and engaging, and as a result, more fruitful.
 Presentations--which do not have to be read papers--can be on pedagogical innovations that have been researched and/or implemented in the literature and culture classroom, as well as on applied linguistics or other pedagogical studies that were not specifically on the teaching of literature and culture but could be applied to it (such as those on motivation/investment, needs analysis, TBLT, project-based learning, etc.).

'I See You, I Hear You': Teaching Agency and Empowerment in Times of Crisis

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2020 - 1:18pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020

This session proposes a re-examination of the undergraduate student writer's concept of agency during times of crisis. We aim to expand our critical understanding of what it means to teach students in a way that empowers, offers agency, and acknowledges the voice of the student during times of crisis, whether such crisis is a result of a global pandemic such as Covid-19, national issues such as police brutality, or the result of a personal struggle such as anxiety or loss and, thus, we welcome contributions that address agency, empowerment, and voice from a variety of academic perspectives.

Pedagogy Pop Up (Textshop Experiments special issue)

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:49am
K. A. Wisniewski, Textshop Experiments
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Pedagogy Pop Up: a Textshop Experiments special issue

Guest Editors: Mari Ramler (Tennessee Tech University) and Dan Frank (UC Santa Barbara)

Due: July 1, 2020

SAMLA (South Atlantic Modern Language Association) 2020—"Community Engagement in the Humanities” (Roundtable)

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:53pm
Elisabeth Austin
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 26, 2020

This roundtable will feature 5-minute papers/presentations that explore best practices for including community engagement within Humanities courses. Experiments with critical pedagogies and research programs, as well as creative and thoughtful engagements with regional and local communities, are especially welcome. The roundtable format features brief formal or informal presentations, leaving plenty of time for interaction and discussion between, and among, participants and audience members.

By June 26, please send a 200-word presentation abstract, a 1-page CV and A/V requests to Elisabeth Austin (elaustin@vt.edu).

 

[Extended deadline] General Issue with a Forum on Data and Computational Pedagogy (6/30/20)

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:35pm
The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy (JITP)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy
General Issue
with a Forum on Data and Computational Pedagogy 

Issue Editors:
Gregory Palermo (Northeastern University)

Brandon Walsh (University of Virginia Library)

Editorial Assistant:
Kelly Hammond (CUNY Graduate Center)

Call for submissions URL: https://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/call-for-submissions/

[EXTENDED DEADLINE] Video Games and Literary Studies – SAMLA (November 13-15, 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2020 - 1:38pm
Craig Carey / University of Southern Mississippi
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 15, 2020

Video games are increasingly popular objects of critical study in the literature classroom. In the spirit of the theme of SAMLA 92, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, this panel invites papers that consider the provocative and controversial implications of studying video games in the context of literary studies. How are games, metagames, and game studies breaking texts and textual paradigms by creating new rules for studying literary objects, forms, and histories? The panel will investigate the affinities and divergences between games and literature, as well as the friction between game studies and literary criticism.

Teaching Online

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 - 9:47pm
Ginger Jones / Louisiana State University Alexandria
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 13, 2020

Distance no longer impedes a college or university education; however, when institutions offer little or no training, scant support for faculty, poor course design, and little integration with campus life, they stymie rigorous programs. This collection of essays will interest practitioners of online teaching, design, and administration of successful online programs. If you are interested in submitting a chapter, please access the chapter proposal form on the Cambridge Scholars Publishing website and submit your completed form to admin@cambridgescholars.com.

CFP, Ongoing Theme: "Undergraduate Research during Times of Disruption," Scholarship and Practice of Undergraduate Research

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 - 12:20pm
Elizabeth Foxwell / Council on Undergraduate Research
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 22, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented new challenges for the higher education community, including those working with undergraduate researchers. Research teams have responded to the pandemic in some exciting and creative ways that have the potential to benefit all engaged in undergraduate research during disruptive events such as pandemics, earthquakes, hurricanes, wildfires, and tornadoes.

Original research articles (2,000–3,500 words) and vignettes (300 words) are invited for Scholarship and Practice of Undergraduate Research (SPUR) that discuss how individuals, disciplines, departments, campuses, and communities have adapted during these events.  Topics and questions of interest include the following:

Literature for Change: How Educators Can Prepare the Next Generation for a Climate-Challenged World

updated: 
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - 2:10pm
Rebecca Young
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 1, 2020

 

Essays or K-12 lesson/unit plans analyzing how literature frames a specific environmental concern are invited from educators around the world. Contributions will be organized in an instructional follow-up resource to Confronting Climate Crises through Education: Reading Our Way Forward (2018). Intended to support educators’ implementation of literature-based interdisciplinary climate instruction, the project is titled Literature for Change: How Educators Can Prepare the Next Generation for a Climate-Challenged World. The collection will be published by Lexington Books, a division of Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc. 

Wooden O Symposium

updated: 
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - 2:09pm
Southern Utah University/Utah Shakespeare Festival
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2020

The Wooden O Symposium invites panel and paper proposals on any topics related to the text and performance of Shakespeare’s plays. The 2020 symposium (our first virtual conference) seeks papers that investigate our 2020 theme: Shakespeare, Story, and Adaptation, as well as Shakespeare in times of hardship. 

Topics could range from the art and power of story-telling, legends and tales, or the drive to adapt stories. Papers may also cover the topics of playmaking in times of war, plague, and other hardships, digital or virtual playmaking, and the importance of theatre during these times. We welcome unique interpretations of these themes.

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