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Peripheries of Modernism – MSA 16 (Nov 6-9, 2014, Pittsburgh, PA)

updated: 
Thursday, May 1, 2014 - 11:59am
Lauren Benjamin/ University of Michigan

Since at least the early 1990s, the transnational turn in Modernist Studies has necessitated a re-thinking of Modernism's traditional boundaries. Propelled by feminist reevaluations of the canon, as well as minority discourses about visibility, New Modernist Studies ask us to think more broadly about Modernism and modernity. This panel seeks to investigate the ways in which various scholars navigate the peripheries of Modernism. For this panel, "peripheries" are broadly defined as texts, movements, or authors previously or currently unincorporated into the traditional canon. How do authors' national identifications relate to other identities, religious, ethnic, or cultural?

Writing Communities: People as Place

updated: 
Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 6:29pm
Falmouth University

Writing Communities: People as Place

Falmouth University PG/ECR Conference July 29th – 30th 2014 (£25)

Call for Papers

Researching place often means researching communities. Landscapes are peopled. History has a living voice. Researchers not only work with communities, but also write them—creatively and academically.

This Postgraduate / Early Career Researcher conference invites papers around the pleasures and tensions of writing with/from community engagement. Abstracts from creative writers, artists, historians, geographers and social scientists are particularly welcome, as well as from any PG/ECR whose research involves communities.

Discussions could include:

Yeats and Kipling: Retrospectives, Perspectives

updated: 
Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 3:03pm
Department of English, Bharati College, Delhi

Yeats and Kipling: Retrospectives, Perspectives
A three-day international conference at Bharati College, University of Delhi, Delhi.
(10, 11, 12 March 2015)

Call for abstracts of papers

[UPDATE] MAY 1 DEADLINE SWCCL

updated: 
Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 6:17am
Southwest Conference on Christianity and Literature "Has Literature Lost Its Faith?" Nov 14-15

"I'm sick of Flannery O'Connor." With this opening line, Randy Boyagoda intrigued numerous readers in his response to Paul Elie's 2012 New York Times article entitled, "Has Fiction Lost Its Faith?"

Boyagoda will be the keynote speaker, and this conference aims to continue the discussion which Elie, Boyagoda, Gioia, and Wolfe have perpetuated. Papers will be considered from a variety of disciplines and fields but should pursue questions regarding the intersection of faith and literature.

The Muse-an International Journal of Poetry ISSN 2249 –2178 ' call for submission for June 2014 issue

updated: 
Tuesday, April 29, 2014 - 2:55pm
The Muse-An International Journal of Poetry

The Muse-an International Journal of Poetry ISSN 2249 –2178 ' call for submission for June 2014 issue

LAST DATE FOR SUBMISSION: MAY 10, 2014

1. Work submitted for publication must be original, previously unpublished .

2. Send 1 to 5 poems and a brief bio-data. A cover letter would be nice.

3. The research papers should be not less than 3000 words. References should be prepared strictly following MLA Stylesheet (7th edition).

4. E-mail your poems, essays and research papers to themuseindia@gmail.com . Response time varies from 2 to 12 weeks.

5. With poem/ research paper the poet/author is requested to submit a statement of originality of work.

[UPDATE] DECADENCE: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 7:39pm
Dalhousie Association of Graduate Students in English

[DEADLINE EXTENDED: Please note the new deadline of May 23, 2014, and the newly announced keynote speakers.]
Decadence: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference
Dalhousie University (Halifax, N.S., Canada)
August 15-17, 2014

Art/Literature/Music as Satire and Social Commentary in the 21st Century

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 4:08pm
The New Union

We require articles on political and cultural subjects for issue 3 of The New Union. For more information and to see our current issue, visit www.new-union.co.uk. Please be sure to read our 'About' page.

We are particularly interested in publishing articles that look at how art, literature, music, etc are used as a means of satire or social commentary in the twenty-first century.

Articles should be between 4,000-6,000 words long, do not need to be written in an academic style, and should include no footnotes. Please send completed articles to editors@new-union.co.uk by 31 July 2014.

Reconstruction, Conservation, Restoration: Reconciling the Past through Word and Image

updated: 
Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 6:20pm
University of Dundee

'Renaissance literary works are no longer regarded either as a fixed set of texts…that contain their own determinate meanings or as a stable set of reflections of historical facts that lie beyond them…rather they are made up and constantly redrawn by artists, audiences, and readers. These collective social constructions on the one hand define the range of aesthetic possibilities within a given representational mode and, on the other, link that mode to the complex network of institutions, practices and beliefs that constitute the culture as a whole.'
Stephen Greenblatt, The Power of Forms in the English Renaissance (1982)

21st-Century American Poetry (PAMLA, 10/31-11/2/2014)

updated: 
Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 5:49pm
Pacific Modern Language Association, Riverside CA

We invite papers on 21st century American poets, poetics, and trends, including but not limited to poetic hybridity, unoriginality (found text, appropriation), socio-political engagement, the procedural, or neoconfessional. Please submit a 250-word abstract and brief bio by 5/9/14.

Laughter in the Digital Age -- A Special Issue of Comedy Studies

updated: 
Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 3:49pm
Peter C. Kunze, University at Albany, SUNY

"Laughter in the Digital Age"
Special Issue of Comedy Studies
Guest Editor: Peter C. Kunze, University at Albany, SUNY

Websites, social media platform, and YouTube and other video-sharing services make the dissemination of comedy easier than ever, and studies of the implications of new media on comedy and humor is only beginning. This issue examines how the Internet as well as new technologies radically change how humor and comedy are produced, exhibited, and distributed in the digital age. I invite papers, broadly conceived, that consider these issues through either theoretical discussions or case studies of specific artists, texts, platforms, or sub-genres. Potential articles may cover:

American Road Literature--A Book Collection

updated: 
Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 2:42pm
William Allegrezza

The American road--the works are there, stretching from Whitman through Keroauc to Gudding. I am looking for scholarly articles that examine some aspect of American road literature. The pieces could deal with novels, poetry, or theory. They could be examinations of individual pieces, explorations of road theory, or research into the gendered nature of the road. Really, anything that relates to the American road would be considered.

I have not pitched this to a press yet, but I do not expect to have that much difficulty doing that if the articles are good. That said, I would like to use a university press for this book.

MSA 16: The Other Senses of Modernism

updated: 
Friday, April 25, 2014 - 2:50pm
Yaron Aronowicz/ Princeton University

While there has been increasing attention to the senses more generally and to the 'lower' senses of smell, taste, and touch in recent years, it is pretty clear that most scholarship on modernism that focuses on sensation is visually (and to a lesser extent aurally) oriented. Attention to the visual in modernist scholarship has allowed us to ask important questions about surface and glamour, affect and image, the urban landscape and the commodity, race and sexuality. But our largely visual version of modernism has also, perhaps, not allowed us to conceptualize and encounter the other senses of modernism.

English Literature and Culture in the Long 18th C/PAMLA 2014 (10/31/14-11/2/14; Riverside, CA) CFP deadline: May 15, 2014

updated: 
Friday, April 25, 2014 - 2:26pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Paper proposals on topics related to English literature and culture in the Long 18th century are sought. Papers may or may not relate to the PAMLA 2014 conference theme of "Familiar Spirits." Possible thematic topics of interest could include Daniel Defoe's "True Relation of the Apparition of Mrs. Veal" (1706), Susanna Centlivre's "The Artifice: A Comedy" (1723), William Hogarth's "Credulity, Superstition and Fanaticism: A Medley" (1762), or the various sermons and religious tracks published throughout the period.

Marginalised Mainstream 2014: Disguise conference, 28-29 November, London, UK [ABSTRACT DEADLINE: 30 May 2014]

updated: 
Friday, April 25, 2014 - 7:28am
Marginalised Mainstream 2014

Keynote Speakers: Dr Bronwen Thomas (Bournemouth University), Dr Naomi Braithwaite (Nottingham Trent University)

28-29 November 2014 Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London

'I like to reinvent myself — it's part of my job.' – Karl Lagerfeld

In 2014, the 3rd annual Marginalised Mainstream conference will consider the varieties, motivations, and meanings of disguise. From secret identities to theatrical performances, from fictional fabrications to factual concealment, disguises of all sorts are part of mainstream culture. This event will explore various manifestations of disguise in popular fiction, media, and culture that have previously been academically marginalised.

[UPDATE] Nineteenth Century Popular Culture deadline 5/15 (Midwest PCA/ACA October 3-5 2014)

updated: 
Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 8:02pm
Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association Conference

Call for Papers:
NINETEENTH CENTURY POPULAR CULTURE
2014 Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association Conference
Friday-Sunday, October 3-5
JW Marriott Indianapolis
Indianapolis, IN
Deadline: April 30, 2014
http://submissions.mpcaaca.org/

Topics may include, but are not limited to, historical and literary treatments of women's and children's periodicals or books, international affairs, nineteenth century "fads" or trends, travel/tourism, technology, science and medicine, temperance, advertising, and slavery.

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