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Kings of Infinite Space?: Renaissance Literature and the Spatial Turn (October 16-19, 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana)

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 10:43pm
full name / name of organization: 
Sixteenth Century Society and Conference
contact email: 

Literary critic Robert Tally has identified what he calls a "turn to the spatial" in humanistic inquiry over the past generation. The insights of spatial theorists like Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, and Bertrand Westphal, as well as those of radical geographers like Doreen Massey, Edward Soja, David Harvey, and Yi-Fu Tuan have altered how literary critics speak about the idea of "space" in relation to literary production. The "turn to the spatial" has been particularly embraced by those who work on literature in an era of the internet and globalization in which our very understanding of how space is experienced is so radically different.

Florida English Irish-American Issue (May 1, 2014)

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 4:12pm
full name / name of organization: 
Florida English
contact email: 

For the 12th annual issue of Florida English, our final issue as associate editors of the journal, we invite submissions dealing with the theme: Irish-American. Ideas for critical articles might include individual literary works by Irish-American authors or directors, films, etc, and the influence of these in shaping genres or the identities of the country at large, communities, or individuals. One might consider the issues of immigration, assimilation, tradition or the loss of tradition, religion, or food. In addition, Florida English is also looking for original pieces of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction that are rooted in the Irish-American experience or explore any facet thereof.

CFP: Textual Overtures 2014 issue, "The Body"

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 1:18pm
full name / name of organization: 
Textual Overtures

Textual Overtures is currently accepting submissions for its 2014 issue under the theme of "Bodies". We invite papers to address this topic from creative perspectives, including bodies of text, bodies of work, the human and non-human body, and so on. We value innovative and inventive interpretation of both subject matter and presentation, and welcome work that embraces digital media, including multimodal and hyperlinked work. We accept work from both Literature and Rhetoric & Composition disciplines.

[UPDATE] Issues in Critical Investigation 2015 Manuscript Competition

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 12:25pm
full name / name of organization: 
Issues in Critical Investigation
contact email: 

Issues in Critical Investigation (ICI) seeks significant, original manuscripts that enrich and develop research in fields related to the study of the African Diaspora. Only untenured professors and independent scholars in the relevant fields are eligible for the competition. The candidate may submit a manuscript on a single, cohesive topic or a series of linked essays in either the Humanities or the Social Sciences.

Submissions will be evaluated by senior professors in various fields of African Diasporic studies. Winners of the two prizes - the Anna Julia Cooper Prize in the Humanities and the Ida B. Wells Prize in the Social Sciences - will each receive $1500 and the opportunity for a book contract.

[UPDATE] Romanticism and Self-destruction. May 9th, 2014

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 11:50am
full name / name of organization: 
The University of Bristol

The University of Bristol's Centre for Romantic and Victorian Studies is pleased to announce a one-day conference on the theme of Romanticism and Self-destruction. The conference will be held on May 9th at the University of Bristol, and will include plenary talks by Professor Andrew Bennett (Bristol) and Professor Caroline Franklin (Swansea). The conference will be held at 43, Woodland Road.

Please see link to website below for further details of the programme:

http://romanticismselfdestruction.wordpress.com/

Call for Books Reviews - Ethos: A Digital Review of Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 11:47am
full name / name of organization: 
Benjamin Mangrum / University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
contact email: 

Ethos: A Digital Review of Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics (www.ethosreview.org) is looking for book reviews to include in the inaugural issue of our journal, which will be published in April. Book reviews need to have some relevance to the CFP for the issue (see http://www.ethosreview.org/journal/), should be approximately between 500-1000 words, and must be submitted in MLA-style format.

Cosmo-graphies: Textual and Visual Cultures of Outer Space. Falmouth University 24-25th July 2014. CFP deadline 25 April 2014.

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 6:03am
full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Niamh Downing/Falmouth University

Cosmo-graphies: Textual and Visual Cultures of Outer Space
2-day conference, Falmouth University 24-25 July 2014

Supported by the British Interplanetary Society

http://www.cosmographies.co.uk

Keynote Speakers:
Prof. Chris Welch – Professor of Astronautics (ISU, Strasbourg), and Vice-President of the British Interplanetary Society

Prof. Philip Gross – Professor of Creative Writing (Glamorgan, UK), T. S. Eliot prizewinner and author of Deep Field (2011)

[UPDATE] Extended: The Art of Reading in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, 28–31 August 2014, Stellenbosch, South Africa

updated: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 2:50am
full name / name of organization: 
Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
contact email: 

Call for Papers (Extended)
The Art of Reading in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Keynote Address: Professor Henry Woudhuysen,
Lincoln College, University of Oxford

Deadline for proposals: 14 March 2014

The Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
promotes scholarly discussion in all disciplines concerned with
Medieval and Renaissance studies.

WSQ Call for Papers, Poetry and Prose: CHILD Issue

updated: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 9:46pm
full name / name of organization: 
WSQ at the Feminist Press
contact email: 

Call for Papers, Poetry and Prose

WSQ Special Issue, Spring 2015: CHILD

Guest Editors: Sarah Chinn and Anna Mae Duane

Children have always been fraught subjects for feminist scholarship. Women are alternately infantilized and subsumed in service of children. Indeed, nowhere are women's rights more assiduously attacked than around the question of their biological capacity to bear and raise children. Our concerns in this issue of WSQ, though, are children and childhood themselves: representations of children, children's experiences, and children's place in the world.

Xenophile calls for undergraduate/graduate comparative literature papers - deadline: March 15th, 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 6:51pm
full name / name of organization: 
Xenophile
contact email: 

The Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Georgia is currently seeking submissions for its second issue of Xenophile, an up-and-coming comparative literature journal. We would like to invite you to take part in this great publishing opportunity. Xenophile will feature the works of undergraduate and graduate students from around the world from diverse disciplines. This is the perfect chance for undergraduate students seeking their first (or second, or third) scholarly publication, as well as for graduate students hoping to reach a new audience.

Poetics of Erasure (MLA 2015 Special Session)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 6:36pm
full name / name of organization: 
Modern Language Association

Can erasure enable artistic and cultural production? The poetics—and politics—of extinction, invisibility, ephemerality, forgetting, or obscurity across genres (e.g., literature, non-fiction, film, or visual art).

Send 500-word max abstracts and CV to Michael Nicholson at nicholsonm@ucla.edu or Amy Wong at amyrwong@ucla.edu by 15 March 2014.

"Modernist Studies and the 'Angloworld': Confluence or Division?" MSA 16, Pittsburgh, PA, November 6-9, 2014

updated: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 3:00pm
full name / name of organization: 
Maxwell Uphaus, Columbia University
contact email: 

Historical debate about the "British world" has recently been galvanized by James Belich's ambitious Replenishing the Earth: The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Angloworld, 1783-1939 (2009). For Belich, the "Angloworld" is the decentralized but interconnected unit formed by Great Britain; its settler colonies in Canada, South Africa, and Australasia; and the United States. He argues that US and British expansion in the long nineteenth century share a common history as parts of a general "Anglo divergence," a massive surge in Anglophone settlement that far surpassed that of other Europeans.

American Literature after 1900 panel - 2014 RMMLA

updated: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 12:59pm
full name / name of organization: 
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association (RMMLA)

American Literature after 1900

We welcome paper proposals on a wide variety of topics spanning the 20th and 21st centuries, including but certainly not limited to:

American Modernism
American Realism, Naturalism
Regionalism
Southern Gothic
Women's Studies
LGBTQ Studies
Marxism
Psychoanalytic Theory
Minority Literatures
Postmodernism
American Capitalism
Violence and Trauma Studies
Novel Studies
Poetry Studies
Short Fiction Studies

Cliché - Issue 18, FORUM Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts. 20 March 2014

updated: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
FORUM: University of Edinburgh Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts
contact email: 

FORUM JOURNAL ISSUE 18: CLICHÉ

As writers and academics we fear having our work criticised as cliché; yet, we continue to repeat and overwork certain ideas to the brink. If we are to believe Marshall McLuhan, "it is the worn out cliché that reveals the creative or archetypal processes in language as in all other processes and artifacts" (Cliché to Archetype 127). The pursuit of newness requires us to label precursors as old and eventually worn out, thereby rendering them cliché. At the same time, a phrase, symbol, or trope would not be used to the point of cliché if it did not continue to strike a chord with so many artists or thinkers. Clichés are cultural relics reread and relocated as benchmarks for new art and interpretation.

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