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[UPDATE] M(o)ther Trouble (30-31 May 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 10:04am
Birkbeck School of Psychosocial Studies, MaMSIE, and CentreCath (University of Leeds)

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: BRACHA ETTINGER (EGS, Saas Fee) and ADRIANA CAVARERO (Verona)

CPRACSIS Humanities Conference June 27 - 28

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 1:26am
c parcsis

The conference, "Rethinking Humanities" attempts to interrogate how the future of humanities can be traced and interpreted from various academic and philosophical quarters, and the ways in which interdisciplinary endeavours in all realms of knowledge respond to this effort. It is widely accepted that Humanities in the academia has encountered unusually critical challenges in the last few decades. The question of how these challenges are transmitted through the corpus and the methodological and canonical framework of traditional Humanities will be pivotal in the making of the conference. The conference attempts in a broad manner to address the following issues:

Postcolonial Actualities: Past and Present, UT Austin 16-17 October 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 4:33pm
Comparative Literature Program, UT Austin

The age of globalism that shapes the world today is both a cause and effect of postcolonial actualities: effect because of the cultural influences (imposed or transmitted) of colonial powers on colonized lands through the centuries; cause because the supposed end of the colonialist era started world events of migration, hybridity, multiculturalism and relocation in the urban centers of former colonial powers. Several critics have already shaped the postcolonial discourse—such as from Said to Bhabha, from Achebe to Rushdie, from the Subaltern Studies Group to Anzaldúa—and the reality of our world today continues to offer numerous possibilities for discussion on postcolonial issues.

Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009. Deadline for abstracts: May 20, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:59pm
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

This SAMLA special session panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By May 20, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

Documenting Non-Western LGBTQ Identity

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:30pm
Chris Pullen/Bournemouth University

CFP: Documenting LGBTQ Identity in Non Western Worlds (08/31/09; collection)Edited by Christopher Pullen Proposals are invited for essays forming part of a new reader focusing on LGBT and queer identity in the developing and non western world, apparent within varying documentary forms, such as film, television and new media.  A central concern is to explore the social agency of media producers and performers, who offer new narratives of potential and progression, challenging Western orientated and traditional worlds.  At the same time some chapters may explore the significance of Western constructions of LGBT and queer identity, which have offered archetypes of political engagement for world wide audiences.  As a consequence this reader intends to foregro

MSA 11: Vernacular Modernisms: What Are They When They're at Home?

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 10:41am
Dr. Bradley D. Clissold

Although some scholarly work has investigated the ways in which various types of modernist ideas and aesthetic tendencies have found articulation and received exposure in the quotidian sphere via advertising, film, popular psychology, popular music, new (household and workplace) technologies, as well as in profound developments in travel and communication, this panel seeks to push such analysis further. Papers are sought that critically explore articulations of modernism as they occur and are experienced in the everyday lifeworld.

[UPDATE] CFP: 19th Century Genre Migration; MMLA Conference, Nov. 12-15 2009; (Deadline April 26)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 7:56pm
Timothy Helwig

Nineteenth-century American print culture was notoriously fluid, as texts migrated from one genre to another. For example, popular city-mysteries of the 1840s and 1850s drew upon sensational crime-reporting and were often first serialized in weekly story papers and then printed in a series of pamphlets before being compiled and sold as complete novels. This session invites papers that explore any aspect of genre migration during or after the rich emergence of the penny press, the black press, and the labor press in the mid 19th century. How does the migration of texts from one genre to the next affect their meaning and their reception? What common interests did these print sources share on questions of racial, ethnic, or class identity?

[General] UPDATE: Sirens, a conference on women in fantasy (10/1 - 10/4; deadline June 7)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 6:51pm
Jessica Moore, Sirens (Narrate Conferences)



CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Sirens
Vail, CO
October 1-4, 2009
A conference on women in fantasy literature presented by Narrate
Conferences, Inc.

Sirens, a conference focused on literary contributions by women to the fantasy genre and on fantasy works with prominent female characters, will take place October 1-4, 2009, in Vail, CO. The conference seeks papers, panels, interactive workshops, roundtable discussions, and other presentations suitable for an audience of academics, professionals, educators, librarians, authors, and fantasy readers.

Science Fiction in Children's Film and Television (proposals by 05/31/09)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 11:51am
R.C. Neighbors/University of Arkansas



It has often been said that science fiction is a literature of ideas. Through the use of familiar tropes, such as spaceships, aliens, and ray guns, the genre uses the future (and sometimes the past) to comment on the present--on current social, cultural, and political ideologies. Likewise, media directed at children often focus on advocating or criticizing similar ideologies, often for a didactic purpose. It is interesting, then, that so little has been said about the joining of these two genres--children's science fiction--particularly when dealing with the visual media of film and television.

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