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CFP: Reassessing Theatrical Paradigms and Imagining Global Rights (ASTR, Puerto Rico, Nov 11-15, 2009; Abstr. due May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 9:52am
American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR)

WORKING SESSION: Reassessing Theatrical Paradigms and Imagining Global Rights (San Juan, Puerto Rico, Nov. 11-15, 2009)

Deadline for Abstracts: Friday, May 15, 2009

Conveners: Brenda Werth, American University; Paola Hernández,
University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kerry Bystrom, University of
Connecticut; Florian Becker, Bard College
(werth@american.edu; pshernandez@wisc.edu; kerry.bystrom@uconn.edu;
fnbecker@bard.edu)

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline May 1, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 9:14am
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

Theatre/Performance Studies and Popular Culture

updated: 
Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 5:42pm
Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association

CFP: Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Popular Culture Association
Theatre and Performance Studies
Boston, MA - November 5-7, 2009

Paper/Panel Proposals Due JUNE 15, 2009.

The study of theatre and performance often reveals unexpected insights into a culture's historical and ideological conditions. Papers in this area will address how the institutions and practices of the performance define concepts of taste, suggest causes and solutions for social conflict, and reflect the importance of race, gender, and religion in relation to national or regional identity. We seek presentations, panels, and papers which focus on the theatre as a reflection of popular and/or American culture. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

"Robin Hood: Media Creature," 22-25 October 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 6:01pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies - University of Rochester, USA

This conference solicits contributions to our understanding of the perennial outlaw hero, and the traditions surrounding his stories, from as wide a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives as possible. The conference requests proposals that expand our knowledge of medieval and early modern historical studies, literary criticism, folklore, musicology and music practice, children's literature, cultural studies, anthropology, film and media studies, performance art and oral recitations, art history, literary history and theory, and philosophy. While our historical understanding of Robin Hood inevitably depends on literary and archival records, even these cultural memories have been shaped by the media that contain them.

[UPDATE] M(o)ther Trouble (30-31 May 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 10:04am
Birkbeck School of Psychosocial Studies, MaMSIE, and CentreCath (University of Leeds)

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: BRACHA ETTINGER (EGS, Saas Fee) and ADRIANA CAVARERO (Verona)

CPRACSIS Humanities Conference June 27 - 28

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 1:26am
c parcsis

The conference, "Rethinking Humanities" attempts to interrogate how the future of humanities can be traced and interpreted from various academic and philosophical quarters, and the ways in which interdisciplinary endeavours in all realms of knowledge respond to this effort. It is widely accepted that Humanities in the academia has encountered unusually critical challenges in the last few decades. The question of how these challenges are transmitted through the corpus and the methodological and canonical framework of traditional Humanities will be pivotal in the making of the conference. The conference attempts in a broad manner to address the following issues:

Postcolonial Actualities: Past and Present, UT Austin 16-17 October 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 4:33pm
Comparative Literature Program, UT Austin

The age of globalism that shapes the world today is both a cause and effect of postcolonial actualities: effect because of the cultural influences (imposed or transmitted) of colonial powers on colonized lands through the centuries; cause because the supposed end of the colonialist era started world events of migration, hybridity, multiculturalism and relocation in the urban centers of former colonial powers. Several critics have already shaped the postcolonial discourse—such as from Said to Bhabha, from Achebe to Rushdie, from the Subaltern Studies Group to Anzaldúa—and the reality of our world today continues to offer numerous possibilities for discussion on postcolonial issues.

Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009. Deadline for abstracts: May 20, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:59pm
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

This SAMLA special session panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By May 20, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

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