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CFP: Recreating OZ; Oct 2-4 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 4:38pm
Erica Hateley

Recreating Oz

Annual Convention of the International Wizard of Oz Club

Manhattan, Kansas – October 2-4, 2009

Call for Papers
We invite submissions for presentations of 15 minutes in length on "Recreating Oz." Possible topics include:

* Adapting Oz for stage and screen

* Marketing and commemorating the Oz books

* Assembling the histories of Oz creators

* Teaching Oz

* Archiving Oz

* Re-reading the Oz books and earlier critical interpretations

* Re-imagining the world of Oz for contemporary audiences (Maguire's Wicked, Stauffacher's Harry Sue, the mini-series Tin Man, comics and graphic novels)

cfp The popular in global times (10/11/2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 12:08pm
Journal Culture, Language and Representation / Jose R. Prado (editor)

CLR Journal (Culture, Language and Representation), ISSN: 1697-7750, seeks contributions for its forthcoming volume to be published, May 2010, on the topic of

The Popular in Global Times

Articles are welcomed that engage with the role of popular culture and the politics of everyday life in shaping new and/or alternative life-styles and cultural spaces in the age of globalization.

Possible suggested topics would include, but are by no means reduced to:

Utopian Spaces of British Literature and Culture, 1890-1945

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 5:20am
English Faculty, University of Oxford (UK)

From the fin de siècle to the Second World War, the construction of alternative social and private spaces exerted a peculiar fascination for many British writers. The cataclysmic historical events of the period stimulated Utopian thinking and feeling even as they seemed to make them problematic or impossible. At the same time radical demands for new spaces, whether political, religious or aesthetic, also generated new ways of reading and writing the familiar urban and domestic spaces of everyday life.

Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television - First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 10:27am
Kathryn Edney/Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television

"Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television"
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 10-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

AREA: Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television

Reading Ethics in the 21 Century (SAMLA, Nov.6-8, 2009) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:39am
Raina Kostova

SAMLA 2009
Reading Ethics in the 21 Century
Call for Papers
Since Aristotle the understanding of ethics as a branch of philosophy has been defined as a pragmatic rather than a theoretical field: ethics does not simply involve a discussion of virtues, but the practice of "virtual activities." It is concerned, as Sartre later insists, with living "in the world," where one has the individual moral responsibility for the other and for the political structure of society. The personal responsibility to act "ethically" in this case is made possible by the essential freedom of choice of each individual.

Fairy Tale Economies

updated: 
Sunday, April 26, 2009 - 7:52pm
Dr. Molly Clark Hillard: University of Southern Mississippi and Group for International Fairy Tale Studies

Fairy Tale Economies

An interdisciplinary, international conference
October 1—3, 2009
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg MS

Mindful of our own global economies, this colloquium addresses economies in fantastic literature and culture. We shall identify economy both as a theme within literatures and as a way of thinking about the value of fantastic literature itself.

[UPDATE] States of Crisis - Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:56pm
Brandeis University - Department of English and American Literature

States of Crisis
Friday, 9 October 2009
Brandeis University
Department of English and American Literature
Seventh Annual Graduate Conference

Since its origin in the ancient Greek krisis, "decision," related to krites, a judge, the term crisis has referred to ideas of discernment, evaluation, criticism, and sifting of evidence. In literary studies, for example, one can see moments of crisis in shifting aesthetics and changing genres as well as in literary tradition(s), character representation, and ideas of narrative. Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches and scholarship, this conference will explore different responses to the idea of crisis in the humanities and social sciences.

Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Summer 2009 Issue: "Experiments" – Deadline – July 6, 2009

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 1:55pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal – English Literature Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This is a critical and creative new journal. It is created to find, edit and publish superior works of fiction, non-fiction, art, multi-media and the like. It will be primarily an online journal. Until an independent website is developed the journal will be housed at www.myspace.com/pennsylvaniajournal.

[UPDATE] Women in Popular Music: Permanent Vacation

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:41am
Women's Caucus for the Modern Languages/Midwest, Midwest Modern Languages Association

"Women in Popular Music: 'Permanent Vacation': Moves and Departures in Women's Popular Music." A change in location, focus, allegiance or perspective can lead to a major shift in an artist's work, which can then lead to a different sound, a different public persona, a different audience. Women artists who start out as one thing end up something else—gospel singers go secular and vice versa, country goes disco, folk rock goes jazz. We invite papers that explore this sort of transition and explore its aesthetic (and other) consequences in the career of a woman artist or group. Patricia S. Rudden, New York City Coll. of Technology, patriciarudden@gmail.com.

Conference: St. Louis, Nov. 12-15

CFP: Reassessing Theatrical Paradigms and Imagining Global Rights (ASTR, Puerto Rico, Nov 11-15, 2009; Abstr. due May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 9:52am
American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR)

WORKING SESSION: Reassessing Theatrical Paradigms and Imagining Global Rights (San Juan, Puerto Rico, Nov. 11-15, 2009)

Deadline for Abstracts: Friday, May 15, 2009

Conveners: Brenda Werth, American University; Paola Hernández,
University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kerry Bystrom, University of
Connecticut; Florian Becker, Bard College
(werth@american.edu; pshernandez@wisc.edu; kerry.bystrom@uconn.edu;
fnbecker@bard.edu)

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline May 1, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 9:14am
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

Theatre/Performance Studies and Popular Culture

updated: 
Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 5:42pm
Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association

CFP: Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Popular Culture Association
Theatre and Performance Studies
Boston, MA - November 5-7, 2009

Paper/Panel Proposals Due JUNE 15, 2009.

The study of theatre and performance often reveals unexpected insights into a culture's historical and ideological conditions. Papers in this area will address how the institutions and practices of the performance define concepts of taste, suggest causes and solutions for social conflict, and reflect the importance of race, gender, and religion in relation to national or regional identity. We seek presentations, panels, and papers which focus on the theatre as a reflection of popular and/or American culture. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

"Robin Hood: Media Creature," 22-25 October 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 6:01pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies - University of Rochester, USA

This conference solicits contributions to our understanding of the perennial outlaw hero, and the traditions surrounding his stories, from as wide a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives as possible. The conference requests proposals that expand our knowledge of medieval and early modern historical studies, literary criticism, folklore, musicology and music practice, children's literature, cultural studies, anthropology, film and media studies, performance art and oral recitations, art history, literary history and theory, and philosophy. While our historical understanding of Robin Hood inevitably depends on literary and archival records, even these cultural memories have been shaped by the media that contain them.

[UPDATE] M(o)ther Trouble (30-31 May 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 10:04am
Birkbeck School of Psychosocial Studies, MaMSIE, and CentreCath (University of Leeds)

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: BRACHA ETTINGER (EGS, Saas Fee) and ADRIANA CAVARERO (Verona)

CPRACSIS Humanities Conference June 27 - 28

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 1:26am
c parcsis

The conference, "Rethinking Humanities" attempts to interrogate how the future of humanities can be traced and interpreted from various academic and philosophical quarters, and the ways in which interdisciplinary endeavours in all realms of knowledge respond to this effort. It is widely accepted that Humanities in the academia has encountered unusually critical challenges in the last few decades. The question of how these challenges are transmitted through the corpus and the methodological and canonical framework of traditional Humanities will be pivotal in the making of the conference. The conference attempts in a broad manner to address the following issues:

Postcolonial Actualities: Past and Present, UT Austin 16-17 October 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 4:33pm
Comparative Literature Program, UT Austin

The age of globalism that shapes the world today is both a cause and effect of postcolonial actualities: effect because of the cultural influences (imposed or transmitted) of colonial powers on colonized lands through the centuries; cause because the supposed end of the colonialist era started world events of migration, hybridity, multiculturalism and relocation in the urban centers of former colonial powers. Several critics have already shaped the postcolonial discourse—such as from Said to Bhabha, from Achebe to Rushdie, from the Subaltern Studies Group to Anzaldúa—and the reality of our world today continues to offer numerous possibilities for discussion on postcolonial issues.

Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009. Deadline for abstracts: May 20, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:59pm
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

This SAMLA special session panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By May 20, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

Documenting Non-Western LGBTQ Identity

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:30pm
Chris Pullen/Bournemouth University

CFP: Documenting LGBTQ Identity in Non Western Worlds (08/31/09; collection)Edited by Christopher Pullen Proposals are invited for essays forming part of a new reader focusing on LGBT and queer identity in the developing and non western world, apparent within varying documentary forms, such as film, television and new media.  A central concern is to explore the social agency of media producers and performers, who offer new narratives of potential and progression, challenging Western orientated and traditional worlds.  At the same time some chapters may explore the significance of Western constructions of LGBT and queer identity, which have offered archetypes of political engagement for world wide audiences.  As a consequence this reader intends to foregro

MSA 11: Vernacular Modernisms: What Are They When They're at Home?

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 10:41am
Dr. Bradley D. Clissold

Although some scholarly work has investigated the ways in which various types of modernist ideas and aesthetic tendencies have found articulation and received exposure in the quotidian sphere via advertising, film, popular psychology, popular music, new (household and workplace) technologies, as well as in profound developments in travel and communication, this panel seeks to push such analysis further. Papers are sought that critically explore articulations of modernism as they occur and are experienced in the everyday lifeworld.

[UPDATE] CFP: 19th Century Genre Migration; MMLA Conference, Nov. 12-15 2009; (Deadline April 26)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 7:56pm
Timothy Helwig

Nineteenth-century American print culture was notoriously fluid, as texts migrated from one genre to another. For example, popular city-mysteries of the 1840s and 1850s drew upon sensational crime-reporting and were often first serialized in weekly story papers and then printed in a series of pamphlets before being compiled and sold as complete novels. This session invites papers that explore any aspect of genre migration during or after the rich emergence of the penny press, the black press, and the labor press in the mid 19th century. How does the migration of texts from one genre to the next affect their meaning and their reception? What common interests did these print sources share on questions of racial, ethnic, or class identity?

[General] UPDATE: Sirens, a conference on women in fantasy (10/1 - 10/4; deadline June 7)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 6:51pm
Jessica Moore, Sirens (Narrate Conferences)



CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Sirens
Vail, CO
October 1-4, 2009
A conference on women in fantasy literature presented by Narrate
Conferences, Inc.

Sirens, a conference focused on literary contributions by women to the fantasy genre and on fantasy works with prominent female characters, will take place October 1-4, 2009, in Vail, CO. The conference seeks papers, panels, interactive workshops, roundtable discussions, and other presentations suitable for an audience of academics, professionals, educators, librarians, authors, and fantasy readers.

Science Fiction in Children's Film and Television (proposals by 05/31/09)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 11:51am
R.C. Neighbors/University of Arkansas



It has often been said that science fiction is a literature of ideas. Through the use of familiar tropes, such as spaceships, aliens, and ray guns, the genre uses the future (and sometimes the past) to comment on the present--on current social, cultural, and political ideologies. Likewise, media directed at children often focus on advocating or criticizing similar ideologies, often for a didactic purpose. It is interesting, then, that so little has been said about the joining of these two genres--children's science fiction--particularly when dealing with the visual media of film and television.

ManuScript interdisciplinary journal, 2009 issue: 'Urges' - deadline June 30th, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 7:33am
ManuScript Journal - English and American Studies, University of Manchester

ManuScript is the peer-reviewed journal in English and American Studies from the University of Manchester. Since 1996, it has encouraged rigorous intellectual discussion and progressive research which reflects critical debates across a variety of disciplines. It aims especially to promote the work of postgraduates and early career academics, and to provide a forum for intellectual and cultural concerns.

ManuScript?s next journal edition, following on from the conference held on 20th February 2009, will be on the topic of ?Urges?. We hope that the theme will encourage and allow room for a wide variety of responses from different discourses and fields.

Literary Journalism Studies call for submissions

updated: 
Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 9:14am
The Journal of the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies

LITERARY JOURNALISM STUDIES, a peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies (IALJS), invites submissions of scholarly articles on literary journalism, which is also known as narrative journalism, literary reportage, reportage literature, "new journalism" and the nonfiction novel, as well as literary nonfiction and creative nonfiction that emphasizes cultural revelation. The journal is international in scope and seeks submissions on the theory, history and pedagogy of literary journalism throughout the world. All disciplinary approaches are welcome.

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