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Theatre/Performance Studies and Popular Culture

updated: 
Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 5:42pm
Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association

CFP: Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Popular Culture Association
Theatre and Performance Studies
Boston, MA - November 5-7, 2009

Paper/Panel Proposals Due JUNE 15, 2009.

The study of theatre and performance often reveals unexpected insights into a culture's historical and ideological conditions. Papers in this area will address how the institutions and practices of the performance define concepts of taste, suggest causes and solutions for social conflict, and reflect the importance of race, gender, and religion in relation to national or regional identity. We seek presentations, panels, and papers which focus on the theatre as a reflection of popular and/or American culture. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

"Robin Hood: Media Creature," 22-25 October 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 6:01pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies - University of Rochester, USA

This conference solicits contributions to our understanding of the perennial outlaw hero, and the traditions surrounding his stories, from as wide a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives as possible. The conference requests proposals that expand our knowledge of medieval and early modern historical studies, literary criticism, folklore, musicology and music practice, children's literature, cultural studies, anthropology, film and media studies, performance art and oral recitations, art history, literary history and theory, and philosophy. While our historical understanding of Robin Hood inevitably depends on literary and archival records, even these cultural memories have been shaped by the media that contain them.

[UPDATE] M(o)ther Trouble (30-31 May 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 10:04am
Birkbeck School of Psychosocial Studies, MaMSIE, and CentreCath (University of Leeds)

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: BRACHA ETTINGER (EGS, Saas Fee) and ADRIANA CAVARERO (Verona)

CPRACSIS Humanities Conference June 27 - 28

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 1:26am
c parcsis

The conference, "Rethinking Humanities" attempts to interrogate how the future of humanities can be traced and interpreted from various academic and philosophical quarters, and the ways in which interdisciplinary endeavours in all realms of knowledge respond to this effort. It is widely accepted that Humanities in the academia has encountered unusually critical challenges in the last few decades. The question of how these challenges are transmitted through the corpus and the methodological and canonical framework of traditional Humanities will be pivotal in the making of the conference. The conference attempts in a broad manner to address the following issues:

Postcolonial Actualities: Past and Present, UT Austin 16-17 October 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 4:33pm
Comparative Literature Program, UT Austin

The age of globalism that shapes the world today is both a cause and effect of postcolonial actualities: effect because of the cultural influences (imposed or transmitted) of colonial powers on colonized lands through the centuries; cause because the supposed end of the colonialist era started world events of migration, hybridity, multiculturalism and relocation in the urban centers of former colonial powers. Several critics have already shaped the postcolonial discourse—such as from Said to Bhabha, from Achebe to Rushdie, from the Subaltern Studies Group to Anzaldúa—and the reality of our world today continues to offer numerous possibilities for discussion on postcolonial issues.

Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009. Deadline for abstracts: May 20, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:59pm
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

This SAMLA special session panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By May 20, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

Documenting Non-Western LGBTQ Identity

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:30pm
Chris Pullen/Bournemouth University

CFP: Documenting LGBTQ Identity in Non Western Worlds (08/31/09; collection)Edited by Christopher Pullen Proposals are invited for essays forming part of a new reader focusing on LGBT and queer identity in the developing and non western world, apparent within varying documentary forms, such as film, television and new media.  A central concern is to explore the social agency of media producers and performers, who offer new narratives of potential and progression, challenging Western orientated and traditional worlds.  At the same time some chapters may explore the significance of Western constructions of LGBT and queer identity, which have offered archetypes of political engagement for world wide audiences.  As a consequence this reader intends to foregro

MSA 11: Vernacular Modernisms: What Are They When They're at Home?

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 10:41am
Dr. Bradley D. Clissold

Although some scholarly work has investigated the ways in which various types of modernist ideas and aesthetic tendencies have found articulation and received exposure in the quotidian sphere via advertising, film, popular psychology, popular music, new (household and workplace) technologies, as well as in profound developments in travel and communication, this panel seeks to push such analysis further. Papers are sought that critically explore articulations of modernism as they occur and are experienced in the everyday lifeworld.

[UPDATE] CFP: 19th Century Genre Migration; MMLA Conference, Nov. 12-15 2009; (Deadline April 26)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 7:56pm
Timothy Helwig

Nineteenth-century American print culture was notoriously fluid, as texts migrated from one genre to another. For example, popular city-mysteries of the 1840s and 1850s drew upon sensational crime-reporting and were often first serialized in weekly story papers and then printed in a series of pamphlets before being compiled and sold as complete novels. This session invites papers that explore any aspect of genre migration during or after the rich emergence of the penny press, the black press, and the labor press in the mid 19th century. How does the migration of texts from one genre to the next affect their meaning and their reception? What common interests did these print sources share on questions of racial, ethnic, or class identity?

[General] UPDATE: Sirens, a conference on women in fantasy (10/1 - 10/4; deadline June 7)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 6:51pm
Jessica Moore, Sirens (Narrate Conferences)



CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Sirens
Vail, CO
October 1-4, 2009
A conference on women in fantasy literature presented by Narrate
Conferences, Inc.

Sirens, a conference focused on literary contributions by women to the fantasy genre and on fantasy works with prominent female characters, will take place October 1-4, 2009, in Vail, CO. The conference seeks papers, panels, interactive workshops, roundtable discussions, and other presentations suitable for an audience of academics, professionals, educators, librarians, authors, and fantasy readers.

Science Fiction in Children's Film and Television (proposals by 05/31/09)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 11:51am
R.C. Neighbors/University of Arkansas



It has often been said that science fiction is a literature of ideas. Through the use of familiar tropes, such as spaceships, aliens, and ray guns, the genre uses the future (and sometimes the past) to comment on the present--on current social, cultural, and political ideologies. Likewise, media directed at children often focus on advocating or criticizing similar ideologies, often for a didactic purpose. It is interesting, then, that so little has been said about the joining of these two genres--children's science fiction--particularly when dealing with the visual media of film and television.

ManuScript interdisciplinary journal, 2009 issue: 'Urges' - deadline June 30th, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 7:33am
ManuScript Journal - English and American Studies, University of Manchester

ManuScript is the peer-reviewed journal in English and American Studies from the University of Manchester. Since 1996, it has encouraged rigorous intellectual discussion and progressive research which reflects critical debates across a variety of disciplines. It aims especially to promote the work of postgraduates and early career academics, and to provide a forum for intellectual and cultural concerns.

ManuScript?s next journal edition, following on from the conference held on 20th February 2009, will be on the topic of ?Urges?. We hope that the theme will encourage and allow room for a wide variety of responses from different discourses and fields.

Literary Journalism Studies call for submissions

updated: 
Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 9:14am
The Journal of the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies

LITERARY JOURNALISM STUDIES, a peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies (IALJS), invites submissions of scholarly articles on literary journalism, which is also known as narrative journalism, literary reportage, reportage literature, "new journalism" and the nonfiction novel, as well as literary nonfiction and creative nonfiction that emphasizes cultural revelation. The journal is international in scope and seeks submissions on the theory, history and pedagogy of literary journalism throughout the world. All disciplinary approaches are welcome.

Shakespeare Performance in Asia video archive

updated: 
Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 10:21pm
Alexander Huang / Penn State University

We are pleased the announce the launch of an open-access online video archive and research project on Asian performances of Shakespeare.

http://web.mit.edu/shakespeare/asia/

This site offers an extensive collection of videos of Shakespeare performances for scholars, students, and any one interested in Shakespeare or Asian cultures. Here you will also find interactive maps and timelines, interviews, biographies of directors and actors, for understanding intercultural theatre from Asia.

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics" Graduate Conference and Event

updated: 
Friday, April 17, 2009 - 11:46am
James B. Carter/ University of Texas at El Paso

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics"

Graduate students in all fields of study are invited to submit 200-word abstracts to the second-annual "El Paso in the Comics" conference and event, to be held on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso, February 23, 2010.

Papers on all aspects of comics scholarship, theory, and pedagogy will be given attention, but those that deal with issues related to artists, creators, characters and/or themes associated with the American Southwest and/or Hispanic/Chicano culture in comics will be given top priority.

The 2009 Creative Writing Issue of the South Asian Review:Short Stories and Creative Nonfiction/Writing from the Margins,July 30

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 1:07pm
Rajender Kaur, William Paterson University

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
The 2009 Creative Writing Issue of the South Asian Review
Short Stories and Creative Nonfiction—Writing from the Margins
SOUTH ASIAN REVIEW invites submissions for the 2009 Creative Writing issue, Volume 30, Number 3. The issue will showcase South Asian writing that either focuses on or emerges from the "margins," which creative writers may interpret broadly in terms of class, caste, gender, sexuality, or geographical location (for example, the North East Indian states, Afghanistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Union of Myanmar, and Sri Lanka, among other such heretofore under-represented locales).

[UPDATE] CFP - Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event - (Deadline: May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 11:26am
Shechem Ministries

Shechem Ministries' Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event is now accepting submissions of papers and artwork for the conference September 17-19, 2009, at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. Selected papers and artwork will be presented at the conference and will be published in the anthology of the conference, Matter, published by Shechem Press. All abstracts and digital image samples are due by noon CST on May 15, 2009, with completed artwork and papers due by August 31, 2009 at noon CST. Abstracts (250-500 words), panel proposals, and inquiries should be submitted via email to MatterCon@gmail.com.

Matters of Taste (MSA 11, 5-8 November 2009, Montréal, Québec, Canada)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 12:42pm
Mary Elizabeth Curtin (University of Toronto)

The modernists' innovations in art, literature, and design were not only aesthetic reactions to traditional forms—they were also critical responses to the idea of taste. Yet if the modernists were unable to endorse their predecessors' conceptions of "tastefulness," devising new models of taste proved equally difficult. This panel will explore the problems associated with articulating taste in the modern period. Rather than trying to capture a concrete "version" of modernist taste, however, the panel will focus on conceptualizing the process(es) of modernist tastes; in other words, how and why did various modernists arrive at their critical judgements? Questions to be addressed will include: What constitutes good/bad taste among the modernists?

UPDATE

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 12:30pm
Journal Issue: Professional Studies Review

The deadline for submission of articles to the next issue of Professional Studies Review has been extended to May 15. Please see the CFP in the upenn archive for further information or contact Joseph Marotta at marottaj@stjohns.edu

[UPDATE] Special Issue: Steampunk, Science, and (Neo)Victorian Technologies

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 4:07pm
Rachel Bowser and Brian Croxall / Neo-Victorian Studies

Neo-Victorian Studies invites papers and/or abstracts for a 2009 special issue on neo-Victorianism's engagement with science and new/old technologies, especially as articulated through the genre of Steampunk. As a lifestyle, aesthetic and literary movement, Steampunk can be both the act of modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artefact and an act of (re-)imagining a London in which Charles Babbage's analytical engine was realised. Steampunk includes applications of nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; speculative extensions of technologies that actually existed; and the anachronistic importation of contemporary science into fictionalised pasts and projected futures.

[UPDATE] CFP: Modern Magazines panel; Modernist Studies Association Conference, November 5-8, 2009, Montréal, Canada

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 2:51pm
Christopher Reed / Pennsylvania State University

MODERN MAGAZINES:

To mark the inauguration of the new biannual Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, this MSA Conference panel calls for papers presenting new work on modern magazines. Papers are encouraged to address the relationship between or among various forms of modernism in magazines ranging from approximately 1885 to 1950. Examples might include the relationship between textual and visual languages of modernism, and/or between magazines as a modern mass-mediated genre and new forms of social identity structured around gender, professional status, or class.

Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV by 1 May to Christopher Reed, Penn State University (creed@psu.edu)

Cultures of Recession Graduate Conference [Nov. 20& 21, 2009]

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 10:17am
Program in Literature, Duke University


Cultures of Recession
An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference Hosted by The Program in Literature, Duke University
November 20 & 21, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Stanley Aronowitz (CUNY), author of How Class Works and Just Around The Corner: The Paradox of a Jobless Recovery

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