all recent posts

The Medieval "Freak Show": Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages (SEMA 2015 - Oct. 22-24, Little Rock)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 11:03am
mearcstapa - mearcstapa.org

Session sponsored by mearcstapa
SEMA (Southeast Medieval Association) Conference Oct. 22-24 in Little Rock, Arkansas

The Medieval "Freak Show": Putting the Monstrous on Display in the Middle Ages

People and creatures perceived as monstrous or wondrous are often put on display for profit or exploitation. At times, this exhibitionism presents itself as "education." What has popularly been called the "freak show" achieved its height via the emergence of working class entertainments that transformed visual cultures in the nineteenth century, as exemplified in P.T. Barnum's circus and its sideshows, but also including innovations such as the stereoscope and the panorama, which prepared the rise of cinema and, later, television.

NeMLA 2016: "Food and Feast in Post-Medieval Outlaw Literature"

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:43am
Alexander L. Kaufman

This session will present new work from scholars in an emerging line of inquiry: post-medieval outlaw narratives and the textual and cultural relevance of feasting and eating. This session purposefully reaches beyond the Middle Ages to demonstrate that outlawry is a global phenomenon, one that is not only present in a variety of literatures, languages, and cultures, but also one that is inherently intertwined with food and feast. While outlawry has its formal origins in the Middle Ages, the outlaw is a figure and trope present in many post-medieval texts: several Renaissance dramas, and especially American, Native American, African American, and Australian outlaw narratives.

The Archive and African American Literature in the 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:19am
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

In an age when technology and digitalization continue to redefine how we think about and explore African American literature, this panel invites considerations of the critical yet ever-evolving relationship between the archive and African American literary production. While possible papers might explore the role of traditional institutional collections in informing us about particular writers and periods, the panel also welcomes broad and open interpretation of the term "archive." How do texts, bodies, and performances function as archives? How does collecting, cataloguing, and curating impact modern racial formation? What is the relationship between the archive and pedagogy? How does the archive relate to contemporary discussions of post-blackness?

Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:08am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

[UPDATE] THE LAND HAS A STORY

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:01am
Pennsylvania College English Association

CALL for PROPOSALS

The Land Has a Story

Pennsylvania College English Association (PCEA) 2015 Conference
October 1-3, 2015
Hilton Scranton and Conference Center
100 Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA 18501

Keynote by Sarah Piccini, Assistant Director
Lackawanna Historical Society

Papers and Panels: Sports and Violence Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 9:46am
Ashland Center for Nonviolence

Interdisciplinary Conference on Sports and Violence, March 19, 2016, Proposals due by October 31, 2015

Americans love sports. An estimated 35 to 50 million American youth play organized sports, the Super Bowl regularly attracts over 160 million viewers, and sports figures are among America's most recognized celebrities.

International Seminar on Contemporary Pakistani Fiction in English (Date: 25-27 February, 2016)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 4:03am
Department of English, Gauhati University

The Department of English, Gauhati University, in its series International Seminars on Contemporary South Asian Fictions in English is happy to announce the second conference of the series. This time the focus is on Pakistan: an attempt at mapping its culture, literature, people, politics and conflicts—in short, ensuring comprehensibility from our varied locations and positions. One of the many themes in this seminar will be to consider the issues that concern writers of/from Pakistan and writers from North-Eastern parts of India.

"Pop Scene: Culture and Opposition in 1990s Britain"

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 9:56pm
Dr Benjamin Halligan / University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Call for Proposals:

"Pop Scene: Culture and Opposition in 1990s Britain"

Proposals are invited for an edited collection that will assess British popular culture in the 1990s. Particular emphasis will be placed on the years characterised by cultural opposition to the Conservative government and then the coming to office in 1997 of the New Labour government, and the aftermath.

The Ruin, the Future

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 7:13pm
Transformations

Transformations: CFP: Issue 28

The Ruin, the Future

Over the past few years a swathe of what has come to be known as "ruin porn" has swept the internet. Perhaps in an uncanny updating of Albert Speer's dark fantasies of "ruin value", photographs of Detroit's abandoned factories and theatres, Chernobyl's crumbling tenements and "urbex" photos of ruined asylums and hotels are gleefully traded on Facebook and Reddit and have amassed immense cultural currency.

New Journal: The Bulletin of International Association for Robin Hood Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 1:33pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies

The International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS) is pleased to announce the creation of a new, peer-reviewed, open-access journal, The Bulletin of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies. The journal will be published bi-annually beginning in Spring 2016 and will be available on the IARHS' website, Robin Hood Scholars: IARHS on the Web: http://robinhoodscholars.blogspot.com/. Scholars are invited to send original research on any aspect of the Robin Hood tradition.

"English Catholicism in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture" panel at ASECS Annual Meeting, March 31-April 3

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 1:14pm
Geremy Carnes

This seminar aims to focus attention on a segment of the English population that is often ignored or treated simplistically in scholarship on our period: the English Catholic community. Recent research by Gabriel Glickman, Alison Shell, and several other scholars has demonstrated that the Catholic community was active politically, socially, and artistically throughout the eighteenth century. This panel seeks papers from historians, art historians, literature scholars, and religion scholars on any subject related to the political or social activities or cultural productions of eighteenth-century English Catholics.

(Post?) Modernist Hitchcock --NEMLA Convention March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 12:40pm
Andrew Schopp/ Northeast Modern Language Association 2016 Conference

In terms of simple chronology, Alfred Hitchock's films span the Modernist era up through the beginning of the postmodern era. While Hitchcock's works have understandably been examined in terms of their connections to/reflections of Modernist culture and/or aesthetics (e.g., Spellbound's use of surrealism, his films' fascination with Modernist technological progress, the influence of Freud, etc.), his later films, especially, would seem to lend themselves to an analysis informed by postmodern theoretical approaches to film and to culture.

Postmodern Gods and Monsters: Gender, Sexuality, Power--NEMLA Convention March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 12:36pm
Andrew Schopp/ Northeast Modern Language Association 2016 Conference

The postmodern god figure has been a staple of postmodern art at the very least since John Barth published Lost in the Funhouse, in which the god figure, both author and father, was simultaneously characterized as asleep, malevolent, kind, and/or insane. As this figure has penetrated popular culture, s/he has become more and more linked to investigations of gender and sexuality. These "god" figures strive to control the lives of others (e.g. Amy Dunne in Gone Girl, Tyler Durden in Fight Club, Kaiser Soze in The Usual Suspects). These puppet masters often work behind the scenes, exploiting the margins of society for either personal or social gain.

[UPDATE] Session:Art as Information: Plans, Maps, Diagrams and Algorithms

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 12:12pm
Universities Art Association of Canada, NSCAD University, Halifax, NS

Call for papers for group session: Art as Information: Plans, Maps, Diagrams and Algorithms for the 2015 UAAC conference at NSCAD University, Halifax, on November 5–7.
New deadline: July 27th, 2015

Pages