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World Pictures: Rethinking Encyclopaedic Fictions (ACLA 2017, Utrecht, July 6-9)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:30pm
Kiron Ward (University of Sussex)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Encyclopaedic fictions are being studied increasingly comparatively: with such studies as Hilary Clark’s The Fictional Encyclopaedia (1990), Franco Moretti’s Modern Epic (1996), Stefano Ercolino’s The Maximalist Novel (2014), and Paul St. Amour’s Tense Future (201 5), as well as forthcoming studies like Nick Levey’s Maximalism in Contemporary American Literature (2016) and Antonio Barrenechea’s America Unbound (2016), critical attention has turned to assessing the commonalities between these daunting, ambitious, totalising texts—and away from single-author approaches.

The Queer Commons: A Special Issue of GLQ

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2016 - 4:37pm
Gavin Butt, Nadja Millner-Larsen, Gay and Lesbian Quarterly
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 16, 2016

The Queer Commons: A Special Issue of GLQ

Editors:

Gavin Butt (University of Sussex)

Nadja Millner-Larsen (Goldsmiths, University of London)

Please send inquiries and submissions to:

GLQqueercommons@gmail.com

 

"Ni Féministes, Ni Soumises": Female identity in the banlieues

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2016 - 4:37pm
NEMLA/Women in French
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

In March 2010, journalists Faïza Zerouala and Widad Kefti published an invited column in Le Monde entitled “Ni Féministes, Ni Soumises.”  Then in their mid-20s and blogging for the Bondy Blog, they targeted the Republican feminism promoted by “Ni Putes, Ni Soumises,” the state-sponsored banlieue-based feminist organization.  Over the last decade, new ways of understanding female identity in the banlieue have multiplied alongside and sometimes in reaction to the NPNS agenda, including expressions of an intersectional and postcolonial feminism in which questions of gender, race, and class converge.  In the same timeframe, women's creative production has grown and diversified, holding at its center ways of being and doing as a fema

Levering Expectations: Young People and Popular Arts Culture in Africa

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2016 - 4:36pm
Paul Ugor and Esther de Bruijn
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 19, 2016

Since Karen Barber theorized the notion of “African popular arts” nearly thirty years ago (1987), a rich field of scholarship has developed around the term, exploring forms of local African expression by the people, for the people, and most often, about the people. The concept of African popular culture has been applied to a vast array of cultural forms in Africa ranging from Onitsha pamphlet literature to Kenyan matatu minibus inscriptions, Ghanaian Concert party theatre, Angolan hip-hop, Nollywood video films, Cameroonian detective fiction, Congolese Sapeur fashion, South African cartooning, trans-continental TV shows like Big Brother Africa, and much more.  

Maïssa Bey: Two Decades of Creativity (1996-2016).

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:28pm
Houda HAMDI
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 15, 2016

(Appel en français à lire en bas)

Maïssa Bey: Two Decades of Creativity (1996-2016).

 Call for contributions: Edited volume. 

Diasporic Cinema: Multigenerational Narratives, Migration, and Identity in Asian America

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:26pm
Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

The Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival (PAAFF) is seeking proposals for papers and  

presentations on the theme of “Multigenerational Narratives, Migration, and Identity.” This  

inaugural conference will be held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from November 14–15, 2016 in  

conjunction with PAAFF 2016, the largest Asian American & Pacific Islander film festival on the  

East Coast.  

   

We seek proposals from scholars across a variety of fields such as Asian Studies, Asian  

American Studies, Cinema and Media Studies, and Visual Art and Culture Studies. Proposals  

Designing (Post)Colonial Knowledge: Imagining South Asia

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:26pm
South Asian Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 7, 2016

In Saloni Mathur’s 2007 book, India by Design: Colonial History and Cultural Display, she analyzes sites of artistic and cultural productions and institutions as they represent Indian design within colonial power structures. Reading sites as varied as museums and colonial postcards contrapuntally, Mathur proposes that the arts’, crafts, and aesthetics were significant not only in a conscious effort to control the visual display of culture and as a set of aesthetic traditions, but also how they signfied dynamic shifts in imperial contacts. Work by scholars such as Mathur, Karen Fiss, S.

Geographies of Comparison: Ireland / Africa (ACLA 2017, Utrecht, July 6-9, 2017))

updated: 
Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 5:03am
Cóilín Parsons
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

 Ireland was, as Robert Young writes, England’s first and always exceptional colony. But it was far from the only one. Its unique colonial status has yielded productive scholarship addressing its anomalous integration into the colonial world. While this scholarship has resulted in some excellent work on Ireland / India relations and an influential volume on the ‘green and black Atlantic’ that performed a valuable intervention in addressing the African dimensions of the Irish world, both Irish and African literary scholarship have largely neglected affiliations between these literary worlds. The organisers of this panel invite papers that will consider literary and cultural intersections between Ireland and select African nations.

 

FOLK NARRATIVES AND CULTURES OF THE NORTHEAST

updated: 
Thursday, July 28, 2016 - 9:55am
Subashish Bhattacharjee and Mandika Sinha
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2017

We are inviting submissions for a forthcoming edited volume that analyse and survey folk narratives from India’s Northeast. The eight north-eastern states—Meghalaya, Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Mizoram, Tripura, Assam, Manipur and Sikkim—have a wealth of narratives that are likely to function as alternative history beyond the generic cultural and geographical assumptions of the history of the Northeast as part of a ‘greater’ Indian history. The polyphonic potential of these narratives can be explored in multiple ways including historical, literary, sociological and political, but not exclusively such.

CFP: "Shattered" - Pivot 6.1 (Articles Due 6 September 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 1:19pm
Pivot: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies and Thought
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 6, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS
"Shattered"
Pivot: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies and Thought

“When you are in the middle of a story it isn’t a story at all, but only a confusion; a dark roaring, a blindness, a wreckage of shattered glass and splintered wood; like a house in a whirlwind, or else a boat crushed by the icebergs or swept over the rapids, and all aboard powerless to stop it.”
– Margaret Atwood

“Here am I and there is my body dancing on glass”
– Sarah Kane

Constructing Indian National Identity in Literature and Film (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, July 25, 2016 - 1:23pm
Dr. Abby Bardi
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

In 1947, the nation of India was formed as an imagined community whose literalness immediately became vividly and at times tragically apparent. The creation of the independent state of India conferred a unified national identity on a place whose phenomenal diversity is manifested in over 1,700 languages as well as an infinitely complex cultural, social, and religious heritage.

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