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REVISITING RICHARD WRIGHT'S 12 MILLION BLACK VOICES: SAMLA Nov. 4-6, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Joshua Privett / South Atlantic Modern Language Association
contact email: 
deadline: 
Monday, June 6, 2016

November 2016 marks the 75th anniversary of Richard Wright's 12 Million Black Voices: A Folk History of the Negro in the United States (1941), a documentary text that juxtaposes Wright's historical analysis of slavery in America with Edwin Rosskam's photographs. This panel seeks to revisit the text from the perspective of recent trends in literary and cultural studies, as well as the conference theme of utopia/dystopia.

TRANSITIONS – New Directions in Comics Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Birkbeck, University of London
deadline: 
Friday, August 26, 2016

TRANSITIONS – New Directions in Comics Studies
at Birkbeck College, London, on Saturday November 19th 2016.

Organised in collaboration with Comica- London International Comics Festival, Transitions at Birkbeck College is unique in offering a regular comics studies symposium and meeting point in London, a platform for emerging research at an event that is free of charge and open to all. Originally convened by PhD students in 2009, Transitions has become an annual fixture in the UK comics scholars’ calendar.

CFP NeMLA (23-26 March 2017): Comics and Graphic Novels in a Transnational Perspective

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Languages Association
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Dear Colleagues,

Apologies for cross-posting. Please find below a CFP for next-year's NeMLA conference in Baltimore, MD, March 23-26, 2017. If interested, please submit a 300-word abstract through the following link: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16284. The submission opens June 15 and ends Septemer 30. Feel free to forward this CFP to anyone who might be interested.

Sincerely,

Julia Ludewig

One Hundred Years of Reading Hopkins: Special Issue of Victorian Poetry DEADLINE January 31, 2017

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Lesley Higgins (York University) and Amanda Paxton (Trent University)
contact email: 
deadline: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2017

To mark the centenary of the first edition of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s Poems (1918), there will be a special issue of Victorian Poetry in summer 2018. The guest editors of the issue are asking for completed essays that focus on a specific poem, or a pair of poems. (Submissions should not focus on “The Wreck of the Deutschland.”) Contributions should account for the shifting critical receptions of the texts since their publication and suggest new directions for Hopkins scholarship. Contributors might consider issues such as the politicization of Hopkins, Hopkins’s changing audience, appropriations of Hopkins, or Hopkins inside and outside of the academy.

Black Lives Matter--albeit Issue 4.1

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
albeit Journal
deadline: 
Monday, August 1, 2016

Issue 4.1: Black Lives Matter

albeit, an innovative, MLA-indexed online journal of scholarship and pedagogy, invites scholarly articles, detailed lesson plans, book reviews, creative pieces, and nonfiction essays exploring the theme of “Black Lives Matter.”

Topics for this issue can include, but are not limited to:

Beauty and Truth in Composition and Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Georgia and Carolinas College English Association at SAMLA
contact email: 
deadline: 
Wednesday, June 8, 2016

 

 

GEORGIA AND CAROLINAS CEA AT SAMLA

In “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” Keats declared that beauty and truth are as one.  But are they? T. S. Eliot called Keats’s pronouncement “meaningless” and “a serious blemish on a beautiful poem.” Scientists and mathematicians debate beauty in terms of symmetry.  Aestheticians ponder what is beautiful and try to determine whether it is true.  Ethicists and theologians explore the moral nexus between beauty and truth. For its 2016 GACCEA at SAMLA session, the GACCEA seeks proposals that discuss beauty and/or truth.  Potential topics include:

Social Identity, Affect, and the First-Year Writing Classroom

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast MLA convention
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

CFP for NeMLA 2017, Baltimore  March 23rd-26th: The first-year writing seminar is a course that fulfills many goals of transitioning students to college-level writing, reading, and discussion. It is one of the first places that students grapple with those “structures of feeling” that gather around social identity and difference. This panel seeks papers that explore pedagogical approaches to affect and social identity in the writing classroom. What approaches help students struggle to write across the gap between feelings, social identity, and analysis? What pedagogies help create spaces of diversity for both feelings and minority identities in the first-year classroom?

Reckonings: Essays on American Revenge Narratives

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Kyle Wiggins, editor Boston University
contact email: 
deadline: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

I invite proposals for a collection of essays that examines the theme of revenge in American fiction, film, and television. Vengeance – that quest for violent reciprocity – is one of storytelling’s oldest and most enduring plots. But in the modern American imaginary the familiar shape of retribution assumes a new form. Over and over, avengers on page and screen desire not only blood but also symbolic victories. In Sherman Alexie’s Indian Killer (1996) a troubled protagonist named John Smith yearns to kill the one “white man [who] was responsible for everything that had gone wrong” for Native Americans.

Utopia and Dystopia in 'Cannibal' Literature of the Black Atlantic

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 10:39am
full name / name of organization: 
SAMLA 88
contact email: 
deadline: 
Monday, June 6, 2016

In The Tropics Bite Back, literary scholar Valérie Loichot highlights Maryse Condé’s urging of Caribbean writers to “bite back” (mordre en retour) at their respective colonial powers. One method, which Condé calls ‘literary cannibalism,’ has been employed by authors throughout the African diaspora. Examples include Zora Neale Hurston’s revisiting of Shakespeare’s Hamlet in her short story “Spunk”, Condé’s own Windward Heights, a revision of Charlotte Brönte’s Victorian classic, and Alice Randall’s The Wind Done Gone.

[UPDATE] Special Session: Teaching for the Post-Anthropocene - PAMLA 2016

updated: 
Saturday, May 28, 2016 - 4:50pm
full name / name of organization: 
Ron Milland, Presiding Officer / PAMLA: Pacific Ancient Modern Language Association
contact email: 
deadline: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

This panel seeks papers from scholars working across the disciplines interested in employing interdisciplinary or otherwise innovative methodologies aimed at facilitating teaching and learning about the Anthropocene at all levels. Analyzing the Anthropocene, or the "Age of Man", poses unique challenges for the classroom context. How does one "teach" the Anthropocene? How might we use the lenses of Rob Nixon's "slow violence" or Christian Parenti's "catastrophic convergence" to add a critical dimension to current teaching? Can we envision ways to work around administrative and standardizing obstacles and even transcend that physical and ideological place we call classroom?

Utopia/Dystopia in Faulkner (SAMLA 88, Nov 4-6, 2016)

updated: 
Saturday, May 28, 2016 - 6:01am
full name / name of organization: 
The William Faulkner Society / South Atlantic Modern Language Association
contact email: 
deadline: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016

The William Faulkner Society welcomes presentations that approach Faulkner’s life and work in relation to this year’s SAMLA conference theme, "Utopia/Dystopia: Whose Paradise Is It?” By June 5, 2016, please submit an abstract of 250-350 words, A/V requirements, and a brief bio, to Harper Strom, Georgia State University, at hstrom@gsu.edu, and Ulf Kirchdorfer, Darton State College, at ulf.kirchdorfer@darton.edu.

Monsters: Theory, Translation, Transbiology

updated: 
Friday, May 27, 2016 - 9:50am
full name / name of organization: 
Monsters and the Monstrous Journal
deadline: 
Monday, August 15, 2016

From the enduring popularity of narratives such as Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) to television series such as the anthology American Horror Story, world cultures appear to be obsessed with bodies and psyches deemed “monstrous.” Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, editor of the collection of essays Monster Theory: Reading Culture, proposes that monster’s body is a cultural body, a body that cannot be categorically confined, but exists to problematize and to escape any categories we may create.  In their 2012 text Speaking of Monsters: A Teratological Anthology, editors Caroline Joan (Kay) S.

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