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UVA-Wise Medieval/Renaissance (Undergrad) (6/19/09; 9/24/09-9/26/09)

updated: 
Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 6:03pm
University of Virginia's College at Wise

The University of Virginia's College at Wise, Medieval-Renaissance Conference is pleased to announce a call for undergraduate papers for the upcoming Medieval-Renaissance Conference, September 24-26, 2009.

Papers by undergraduates covering any area of medieval and renaissance studies—including literature, language, history, philosophy, science, pedagogy, and the arts—are welcome. Abstracts for papers should be 250-300 words in length and should be accompanied by a brief letter of recommendation from a faculty sponsor.

Abstracts (and letters) should be submitted electronically or by regular mail by June 19, 2009 to:

Literary Journalism Studies call for submissions

updated: 
Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 9:14am
The Journal of the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies

LITERARY JOURNALISM STUDIES, a peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies (IALJS), invites submissions of scholarly articles on literary journalism, which is also known as narrative journalism, literary reportage, reportage literature, "new journalism" and the nonfiction novel, as well as literary nonfiction and creative nonfiction that emphasizes cultural revelation. The journal is international in scope and seeks submissions on the theory, history and pedagogy of literary journalism throughout the world. All disciplinary approaches are welcome.

[UPDATE] Deadline extended 5/15/09: Women's Resistance in Early Modern England

updated: 
Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 8:49am
RSA 2010 Venice / Renaissance Society of America (April 8-10, 2009)

Early Modern England was a benchmark for literary and political activity by women, from Anne Askew's Examinations in the first half of the sixteenth century to Anna Trapnel's political prophecies in the final decades of the seventeenth. While the lengthy reign and potency of Elizabeth I (1558-1603) certainly set a precedent for early modern women's writing, texts by women played a significant political role well before and after her rule, and arguably found their apogee in the ideological fervor that surrounded the reigns of her Stuart successors. More importantly, women authors actively participated in the early modern public sphere at a time when magistrates and divines were striving to situate women within the realm of the household.

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline May 1, 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 3:56pm
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

[UPDATE] CFP - Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event - (Deadline: May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 11:26am
Shechem Ministries

Shechem Ministries' Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event is now accepting submissions of papers and artwork for the conference September 17-19, 2009, at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. Selected papers and artwork will be presented at the conference and will be published in the anthology of the conference, Matter, published by Shechem Press. All abstracts and digital image samples are due by noon CST on May 15, 2009, with completed artwork and papers due by August 31, 2009 at noon CST. Abstracts (250-500 words), panel proposals, and inquiries should be submitted via email to MatterCon@gmail.com.

The Absent Center: A Graduate Student Conference on Contemporary Issues in Political Theology (19, 20 February 2010)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 14, 2009 - 7:21pm
Government Department / University of Texas at Austin

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Absent Center

A Graduate Student Conference on Contemporary Issues in Political Theology

University of Texas at Austin, Government Department

19-20 February 2010

Keynote speakers:

Simon Critchley (New School for Social Research)
Eric Santner (University of Chicago)

The Secular enlightenment sought to replace religion as a foundation for political legitimacy and personal meaning. It led to a profound disappointment, one not specific to contemporary life. Even Spinoza, the great rationalist and philosopher of immanence, feared for a society lacking any belief in salvation whatsoever.

CFP: Migration, Diaspora and Identity: M/MLA Religion and Literature, Deadline Apr. 30

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 3:52pm
Midwest Modern Language Association Religion and Literature section

Religion and Literature: "Migration, Diaspora, and Identity." In the self-identity of many religious groups, the historical experience of diaspora is an important theme. War, persecution and famine have driven groups across every continent in search of peace, freedom and homeland. How does the ancestral memory of diaspora color the self-identity and story of a contemporary people? How do the themes of chosenness, promise and homeland affect a people's current story about themselves, in both individual and group tellings? Where do the descendants of diaspora belong? Send 250-word proposals by April 30 to Bobbi Dykema Katsanis, Graduate Theological Union, rdykema@ses.gtu.edu. M/MLA 2009 Convention Nov.

Cultures of Recession Graduate Conference [Nov. 20& 21, 2009]

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 10:17am
Program in Literature, Duke University


Cultures of Recession
An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference Hosted by The Program in Literature, Duke University
November 20 & 21, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Stanley Aronowitz (CUNY), author of How Class Works and Just Around The Corner: The Paradox of a Jobless Recovery

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event and Anthology (Deadline May 15, 2009) Conference: Sept. 17-19, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 7:20pm
Shechem Ministries, Inc.

Shechem Ministries' "Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event" is now accepting submissions of papers and artwork for the conference September 17-19, 2009, at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas.

Selected papers and artwork will be presented at the conference and will be published in the anthology of the conference, Matter, published by Shechem Press.

CFP: Humor & Horror/SF/Fantasy - Detroit, MI, 10.30-11.1.09

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 6:03pm
Midwest PCA/ACA

Dear Humor / Horror, SF, Fantasy Scholar:

You are invited to submit a paper to the Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association annual meetings being held at the Book Cadillac Westin Hotel, Detroit, Michigan, from Friday through Sunday, October 30-November 1, 2009.

More details about the conference, the hotel and its rates can be found at the MPCA / MACA website.

Disposable Culture and Spaces of Consumption in Medieval Europe

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 4:31pm
Rebecca Flynn and Salvatore Musumeci

Call for Papers:
Disposable Culture and Spaces of Consumption in Medieval Europe
For the annual meeting of the Medieval Academy will be held 18-21 March 2010, on Yale University Campus, New Haven, hosted by Connecticut College, Southern Connecticut State University, Trinity College (Hartford), University of Connecticut, Wesleyan University, and Yale University.

Nineteenth Century Popular Culture Panel - Proposals May 1 2009 - Conference October 30-November 1 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 4:18pm
Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association

The MPCA/ACA is seeking paper proposals that address any aspect of 19th century American popular culture. We are especially interested in papers that focus on culture from a specific critical perspective; however, no particular approach is required. Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
- Literature
- Dime novels
- Politics
- Sports
- Religion
- Westward expansion
- Native Americans
- Women in popular culture
- Entertainment

Send a 250-word abstract along with full contact information to panel chair, Patrick Prominski (pprominski@gmail.com). Be sure to include MPCA/ACA in the subject header. Deadline for submissions is May 1, 2009.

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline May 1, 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:53am
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

Re(Viewing) the Landscape of Visual Rhetoric: Topics in Visual Rhetoric; SAMLA Conf. Nov 6-8, 2009; Abstracts Due May 31, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:52am
Mary Hocks, English Dept, Georgia State University

RE(VIEWING) THE LANDSCAPE OF VISUAL RHETORIC: TOPICS IN VISUAL RHETORIC
The SAMLA special session on visual rhetoric welcomes paper, panel, and performance proposals on topics that deal with all aspects of visual rhetoric, such as visual culture and the Web; teaching visual rhetoric in the classroom; image use in blogs; exploring identities with visual rhetoric; visual rhetoric in student writing; (re)presentations of the body; visual rhetoric in politics; visual rhetoric of physical spaces; visual rhetoric and environmental issues; and other relevant topics.

Cultural Consequences of Unmotherhood

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 2:32pm
Nicole Herrera/ University of Akron

Cultural Consequences of Unmotherhood

Scholars in the fields of Anthropology, Biology, Cultural Studies, Economics, English, Gender Studies, History, Medicine, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Women's Studies, and others are engaged in attempting to understand the construction and consequences of motherhood. A woman's physiological ability to conceive, carry, and birth children, the assumption that the ability to raise children is a natural physiological trait, the ideological pressures to do so, the unique duties and responsibilities of motherhood, and subsequent rewards and penalties are just a few of the areas of inquiry found in literature.

"The Future ain't what it used to be" - PROPOSALS: MAY 15th 2009 / CONFERENCE: 17th JUNE 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 1:05pm
The Future ain't what it used to be: Interactions of Past, Present and Future in Literature and Visual Media - Postgraduate Conference

"The Future ain't what it used to be" is the seventh annual Postgraduate Conference held by the English Programme, University of Dundee. It will investigate questions such as: how have perspectives of the future changed over time, how is the future perceived in literature and the media today, and how do representations of the past help us to imagine the future? Proposals should be 300 words long, for papers lasting 20 minutes. The deadline for proposals is 15th May 2009.

For more information contact Laura Findlay (l.f.findlay@dundee.ac.uk), or go to www.dundee.ac.uk/english/index.htm

REA: A Journal of Religion, Education and the Arts

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 9:51am
Mater Dei Institute of Education

REA: A Journal of Religion, Education and the Arts invites contributions for its forthcoming issue to be published online in December 2009. Research in the areas of religion or theology, education or the humanities will be considered for publication and contributors are also welcome to submit multi or inter-disciplinary articles that span more than one of these areas.

Articles should be 5-6,000 words and should conform to the Harvard author-date referencing system. The closing date for submissions is September 1st, 2009. Please send your article and a short abstract of 200 words to the following email address: paula.murphy@materdei.dcu.ie

Book reviews are also welcome.

'Thou prays't not well': Prayer in performance and society in the Renaissance, RSA Conference, Venice, 8-10 April 2010

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 8:02am
Joseph Sterrett, Cardiff University

This panel seeks to explore aspects of prayer in European culture in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. How was prayer represented in literature, plays or works of art? How did communities utilize prayer as a distinguishing feature for their religious identity, and how were these forms of prayer policed? More importantly, in what ways does the representation or prayer in literature and drama intersect with its importance as a means of defining religious loyalties and identities?

CPF: Apocalyptic Belief and the Internet (Abstracts May 1)

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 5:30pm
Robert Glenn Howard

DEADLINE May 1, 2009

CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTER PROPOSALS
(Please distribute widely, and my apologies for any cross-posting.)

Network Apocalypse: Visions of the End in an Age of Internet Media

"Dark Migrations: Territorializing the Savage Body" MMLA November 12-15 2009, abstract due April 20.

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 3:38pm
Jeff Aziz, University of Pittsburgh

This panel invites papers that engage with narratives that problematize the dominant American narrative of migration into the "savage" West. For instance, In Jim Jarmusch's 1995 film Dead Man, the Native American Xebeche is captured and shipped east by railroad caged as an animal in a sort of counter-migration, even as European settlers travel west into the territories from which his relatives are being displaced. Of particular interest are papers that explore the relationship between suffering, objectified, or commodified bodies and American landscape.

Semiotics of Revelation

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 12:41pm
International Association for Semiotic Studies

The roundtable will focus on the semiotic implications of the idea of revelation. What are the characteristics of meaning that is produced, communicated, and received as "revealed"? Are there anthropological, or even bio-logical constants in such characteristics, or do they rather vary according to socio-cultural contexts and historical époques? What terms express the idea of revelation in the different natural languages, and with which semantic connotations? What values are attributed to the idea of a revelation of meaning, and what, on the contrary, to a meaning that is non-revealed? What relations of rupture, or tension, obtain between these different valorizations? Through what narratives is the idea of a revealed meaning elaborated?

New Voices 2009: The Literature and Rhetoric of the Apocalypse (October 22-24, 2009) [GRADUATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 9:26am
New Voices Conference: Georgia State University Graduate English Assoc.

The 10th Annual New Voices Graduate Student Conference focuses on representations of the Apocalypse as they manifest throughout history, across cultures, and in language. The conference committee invites papers dealing with any aspect of mankind's conception of the End-of-Days. Individual papers or panel proposals may center upon any time period and any culture or people. They may furthermore draw thematically from such academic disciplines as literary criticism and theory, poetry, fiction, philosophy, religious studies, medieval and renaissance studies, art history, biblical history, cultural geography, and folklore.

International Multidisciplinary Women's Congress (October 13-16, 2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 5, 2009 - 3:10pm
Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Izmir, TURKEY

Please, note that abstracts of 300 words will be submitted electronically at our website at http://www.imwc2009.org. Deadline for submission of proposals is June 1, 2009.

The IMWC will take place at the Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey between October 13th and 16th, 2009 and the overarching theme for the Congress will be "Change and Empowerment."

The aim of the Congress is to foster communication and collaboration between academicians and to open up a discussion platform for the analysis, development, and exchange of ideas on the following Women-related main topics:

SAMLA 2009 Session: Teaching Language and Literature

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2009 - 12:37pm
Rachel Luria/ SAMLA

Session Title: Teaching Language and Literature
Open Topic

We welcome papers that deal with any and all issues related to the teaching of language and literature. Proposals may be related to issues such as the language of gender, comics as literature, or teaching new media, but this is not required. Send your inspiring ideas!

By May 1st, please submit proposals of no more than 150 words by email – preferred – to luria@mailbox.sc.edu or by post to University of South Carolina, Arts Institute, Attention: Rachel Luria, 1212 Greene Street/228 Sumwalt, Columbia, SC 29208

The City (September 24-26 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2009 - 5:14pm
Tiffany Eberle Kriner / Conference on Christianity and Literature

The regional meeting of the Conference on Christianity and Literature will explore a wide variety of approaches to the intersections between Christianity, literature, and the city. This three-day conference, held just west of Chicago at Wheaton College (IL) will include keynote addresses by Andrew Delbanco and Anne Winters, traditional panels, at least two undergraduate student panels with faculty moderators, poetry readings, art exhibitions, and associated excursions into Chicago. Proposals for panels, roundtables, or individual twenty-minute presentations are invited on the following or related topics:

5th 'Medievalism Transformed' postgraduate conference - Keynote: Catherine Batt, University of Leeds

updated: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2009 - 7:59am
Bangor University

20th June 2009
Translating the Middle Ages.

Submission Deadline: 17th April 2009

'Medievalism Transformed' is an interdisciplinary postgraduate conference for researchers in a variety of disciplines. The one-day event, which is supported by the Centre for Medieval Studies, will be held at Bangor University on the 20th of June. The theme for this year's conference will be Translating the Middle Ages: we will be convening to explore the practice of translating in the Middle Ages, but also to discuss the various ways in which medieval culture has been translated or adapted to the modern era. Topics within the general scope of the conference will be considered, including (but not limited to):

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