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Young Adult Literature and the Postsecular [Update]

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 11:14am
Jacob Stratman
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

I am interested in collecting essays that explore religious belief and practice in contemporary young adult fiction (written after 2001).  There are several questions that each chapter will address:  How are the religious experiences of teenagers expressed in contemporary young adult literature?  What is the relationship between the characters’ religious beliefs/values and their interactions with parents, their friends, their schools, and their societies (real and fantastic)?  How do young adult authors use religious texts, traditions, and beliefs to add layers of meaning to their characters, settings, and plots?  How does contemporary young adult literature place itself into the larger conversation regarding the postsecular? 

Witchcraft & Catholicism in the Early Modern Period

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:11am
Rocky Mountain Medieval & Renaissance Association at the RSA
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

This panel seeks proposals which address works (artistic, literary, historical, etc.) at the intersection of Catholicism and witchcraft (demons, devils, witches, magic, etc.) between 1500 and 1700 in England and/or Continental Europe. Of particular interest are works which link witchcraft and Catholicism; critique governmental or religious responses to witchcraft and/or Catholicism; and/or representations in literature or drama which compare witchcraft and/or Catholicism.

SEDITIOUS ATHEISM: AUTHORS PROSECUTED FOR DENYING PARADISE

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:31am
Anna Faktorovich, PhD/ SAMLA Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016

George IV fined Leigh Hunt, the Editor, £100 for publishing Lord Byron’s anonymous satire, “The Vision of Judgment,” in their new independent journal, “The Liberal,” about George III not exactly having gone to heaven in 1823. Earlier, on September 3, 1811, Byron wrote in a letter to Hodgson, a friend, “I will have nothing to do with your immortality; we are miserable enough in this life, without the absurdity of speculating upon another. If men are to live, why die at all? And if they die, why disturb the sweet and sound sleep that ‘knows no waking’?...

Western Area: Figures of Power and Subversion in Film & Television

updated: 
Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 11:08am
The 2016 FILM&HISTORY Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Are there really no Sundays west of St. Louis and is there no god west of Fort Smith? Representing a set of assumptions about the American Character, progress, law, order, and the conquest of nature, conflicts concerning the ideal and themes of redemption figure prominently in Westerns.  On the Western’s frontier, figures of power and subversion abound—lawmen and outlaws, gamblers and gunmen, cavalry wives and soiled doves, the Indian chiefs and buffalo scouts.

The Body and Spiritual Experience: 1500-1700 (RSA 2017)

updated: 
Monday, May 9, 2016 - 3:11pm
Victoria Brownlee
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 20, 2016

Abstracts are invited for a proposed series of sessions on the body and spiritual experience in Europe 1500-1700, intended for the next Renaissance Society of America meeting (30 March–1 April 2017, Chicago). Possible questions might include: In what ways does biblical reading shape understanding of the relationship between physical and spiritual matter?  Which body parts or material processes are implicated in spiritual experience?

Religion in American Literature

updated: 
Monday, May 9, 2016 - 10:17am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, 11/11-11/13, 2016
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

This panel seeks to address how questions of faith have shaped cultural meanings in American literary history.  In particular, it welcomes papers that examine the relationship between secularity and literary development in the United States.  Some of the questions we will consider are: How did the growth in secularity influence the way American writers conceptualized faith and experienced transcendence?  How did it influence the way they responded to suffering? How did they express the tension of living within a secular age? What are the expressions of transcendence within secular culture? 

The proposal deadline is June 10, 2016.  Please submit your proposal by going to the PAMLA website:  pamla.org

The Piety and Politics of Women’s Food Practices in a Changing South Asia

updated: 
Sunday, May 8, 2016 - 9:20am
Usha Sanyal, Queens University of Charlotte
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 27, 2016

The Piety and Politics of Womens Food Practices in a Changing South Asia

 

This book will explore issues related to gender, religion, work and identity in South Asia through the lens of food practices. Food has powerful discursive and ritual value across South Asian cultures and of course occupies an important place in the everyday lives of women across the class spectrum. It therefore offers a unique window into issues of gender difference, religious power, cultural identity, and social change in all South Asian communities and religious traditions—Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, Sikhism, and others.

Reprobate Humanisms in Early Modern England

updated: 
Friday, May 6, 2016 - 2:10pm
Daniel R. Gibbons, Catholic University of America; Ben Beier, Washburn University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

It would be difficult to disentangle fully the various strands of religious reform in early modern England from the educational, aesthetic, and philosophical movements that fall under the broad term 'humanism'.  Nevertheless, the relationship between religious reform and new developments in various humanist projects was not always peaceful. The tensions between humanism and religious reform provoke many questions:  Where were the lines of fracture in the symbiotic relationship between religious reform and the humanisms of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England? Did religious reform restrict the development of humanism in England, or did it promote a new flourishing of humanism?

Planned Obsolescence: Texts, Theory, Technology

updated: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 9:21am
Université de Liège (Belgium)

Call for papers
Planned Obsolescence: Texts, theory, technology
Université de Liège (Belgium) - December 8th and 9th, 2016

[Pour le français, voir plus bas.]

UPDATE: Extended Deadline for the 31st Annual Interdisciplinary Conference in the Humanities

updated: 
Monday, May 2, 2016 - 2:06pm
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures University of West Georgia

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THE 31TH ANNUAL INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE IN THE HUMANITIES

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, the College of Arts and Humanities, and the University of West Georgia (UWG) invite you to celebrate the 31th Annual Interdisciplinary Conference in the Humanities, September 22-September 24, 2016. We welcome submissions from across the Humanities, Fine Arts, and the Social and Natural Sciences, dealing with NATURE/CULTURE/COMMERCE and its many crossroads and intersections. Papers, exhibits, performances and screenings may be submitted by scholars, graduate students, writers, artists, and performers. Papers in French, German, or Spanish are welcome when part of a pre-organized panel.

[UPDATE] Urban Studies - MPCA/ACA 2016 Conference May 15 Extended Deadline

updated: 
Monday, May 2, 2016 - 12:07pm
Megan Cannella/MPCA/ACA

Call for Papers
Urban Studies Area
2016 Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association Conference

Thursday-Sunday, 6-9 October 2016
Chicago, IL - Hilton Rosemont Chicago O'Hare
Extended Deadline: May 15, 2016

The Urban Studies Area of The Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association is now accepting proposals for its upcoming Conference in October 2016.

SLSA 2016 – Creating Accounts of Creative Bodies: the Narrative Work of Fertility

updated: 
Sunday, May 1, 2016 - 9:57pm
Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts (SLSA)

Babies perform a lot of narrative work. George Eliot's Middlemarch narrator playfully quips that "where there was a baby, things were right enough," and that "error, in general, was a mere lack of that central poising force," and this is often as true for narratives themselves as for the characters therein. Babies often serve as forces of disruption or normatization in literary texts, and this panel seeks to explore the narrative work that the (pro)creative and (pro)created bodies of mothers and babies perform. This panel seeks to situate the creative work of female reproduction in the context of its narrative creation, taking seriously the textual creation and performance of fertility in literary texts.

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