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English Seventeenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, December 27, 2016 - 11:04pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Papers on any aspect of British seventeenth-century literature (including Restoration), for the annual meeting of the 2017 Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association, Spokane, Washington on October 12-14, 2017. Email 200-300 word proposals, by March 1, to clayldaniel@live.com or clay.daniel@utrgv.edu All proposals are acknowledged. You do not have to be a member of RMMLA to propose a paper, but you should become a member by April 1 to be listed in the program.

Hawthorne and the Environment: Ecocritical Perspectives

updated: 
Monday, December 12, 2016 - 11:51am
Nancy Sweet / California State University, Sacramento
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Through depictions of forests and seashores, animals and plants, the wild and the domestic, Hawthorne’s writings abound with explorations of the human relationship to the physical environment. Yet the moral and ethical significance of nature as physical, biological environment has often been overlooked in critical interpretations of “Nature” as symbol in Hawthornian romance.

BREATHLESS SPIRITUALITY? (IN ART, AESTHETICS AND POPCULTURE)

updated: 
Monday, December 12, 2016 - 11:53am
Institute of Literary and Artistic Communication
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 22, 2017

In 1975, Mircea Eliade constates in his book Sacred and Profane: „Desacralization is significant for the whole experience of non-religious man of the modern society and re-discovery of existential extents of a religious man from archaic societies represents for him still a bigger difficulty for the same reason,“ (Eliade, 2006, p.14). He also remarks: „modern non-religious man receives his new existential situation: he recognizes only himself as a subject and an agent of history and refuses any references to transcendence. Sanctity is an obstacle par excellence for his freedom,“ (Ibid, p.134).

Picturing Paradise in 19th Century British and North American Art: Past, Lost, Regained

updated: 
Sunday, December 4, 2016 - 11:56pm
Association of Scholars of Christianity in the History of Art
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPER PROPOSALS

 

Picturing Paradise in 19th Century British and North American Art: Past, Lost, Regained

A Special Issue of Religion and the Arts edited by Rachel Smith and James Romaine

 

PROPOSALS DUE: February 1, 2017

 

International and Interdisciplinary Scientific Conference: Culture of Reformation and reforming in culture

updated: 
Friday, December 2, 2016 - 10:06am
University of Lodz and Academy of Music in Lodz, Polish Academy of Science
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 22, 2017

Ever since Max Weber in scientific and philosophical reflection, the idea appeared that the Reformation is not only a historical phenomenon but above all socio-cultural. Associated with it were, among others, individualism, experientialism, modernity, innovation, activism, asceticism in the world, creativity, self-reflection, communitarianism, economy, development of accounting, criticism, capitalism, the culture of writing and printing. It's only a few examples of phenomena and values ​​associated inextricably with the wider Reformation in culture. The very existence of the Reformation bears fruit historically in the concept of tolerance and respect for diversity. The list of themes and values ​​certainly is not limited and closed.

 

THE GOOD. LIFE. Fifth Salzburg Institute Symposium

updated: 
Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 10:26am
Salzburg Institute of Religion, Culture and the Arts
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 15, 2017

Call for Papers:

THE GOOD. LIFE. Fifth Salzburg Institute Symposium, University of Salzburg, Austria, July 27, 2017

 

Etudes Episteme special edition: Profane Shakespeare

updated: 
Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 10:26am
Karen Britland / UW-Madison
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 15, 2016

Profane Shakespeare

Perfection, Pollution, and the Truth of Performance

“But no perfection is so absolute,

That some impurity doth not pollute”

Rape of Lucrece, l. 899

 

For its 33rd issue (Spring 2018), the online peer-reviewed journal Etudes Epistémè (www.episteme.revues.org) seeks articles examining Shakespeare’s treatment of the notions of perfection (or “purity”) and pollution (or “impurity”), understood not only along traditional moral and religious lines, but also, more “profanely”, in aesthetic and hermeneutic terms.

 

International Conference on Religion, Literature & Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 10:26am
Higher Education and Research Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Literature, being a creative universal form of expression, addresses spiritual, emotional and social concerns of humanity. It is known that there are reciprocal relations between literature and religion, still the question of how these two disciplines interact with each other invites fresh thought. Looking at the past of English Literature, it is abundantly clear that critics even before Mathew Arnold have referred back to form and content of religious scriptures.

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