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The Spaces of the Renaissance Anatomy Theatre

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:53pm
Vernon Press
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 30, 2020

Vernon Press invites chapters for an edited volume on the spaces within Renaissance anatomy theatre.

The collection asks, how did actions and conversations taking place within a Renaissance/Early Modern anatomy theatre make their way into European society? How did public dissection and anatomical research influence the arts, government, or society? This collection examines the spaces of intersections within the anatomy theatre, the aspects of gender present in anatomical discourse and images, and a shared interest in the physical body and its parts.  

Performance Beyond Drama – Special Issue, JMEMS

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:50pm
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2020

The Editors invite submissions for Performance Beyond Drama, a special issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies.  

Cultures of Collectivity in French Literature Before 1789

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 - 9:45pm
MMLA 2020 (Milwaukee, WI, Nov. 5-8)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, May 31, 2020

In keeping with this year’s MMLA conference theme of “Cultures of Collectivity”, this panel solicits propositions that reflect on the many ways in which the individual and the collective were conceived in pre-revolutionary society. Rather than viewing the individual and the collective as being separate facets of social existence, papers that look at the liminal movement between subjective experience and the larger political body will be of particular interest. Possible topics include, but are certainly not limited to:

"Work, work your thoughts": Henry V revisited

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 - 4:21pm
Sophie Chiari, Sophie Lemercier-Goddard PUBP - ENS Lyon/Université Clermont Auvergne
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 10, 2020

"Work, work your thoughts": Henry V revisited

"Work, work your thoughts": Henry V revisited

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 - 12:23pm
Sophie Chiari, Sophie Lemercier-Goddard PUBP - ENS Lyon/Université Clermont Auvergne
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 10, 2020

"Work, work your thoughts": Henry V revisited

CFP - Journal of the Wooden O

updated: 
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - 2:09pm
Dr. Stephanie Chamberlain/Journal of the Wooden O
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 16, 2020

The Journal of the Wooden O is a peer-reviewed academic publication focusing on Shakespeare studies. It is published annually by Southern Utah University Press in cooperation with the Gerald R. Sherratt Library and the Utah Shakespeare Festival.

The editors invite papers on any topic related to Shakespeare, including Shakespearean texts, Shakespeare in performance, the adaptation of Shakespeare works (film, fiction, and visual and performing arts), Elizabethan and Jacobean culture and history, and Shakespeare’s contemporaries.

Wooden O Symposium

updated: 
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - 2:09pm
Southern Utah University/Utah Shakespeare Festival
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2020

The Wooden O Symposium invites panel and paper proposals on any topics related to the text and performance of Shakespeare’s plays. The 2020 symposium (our first virtual conference) seeks papers that investigate our 2020 theme: Shakespeare, Story, and Adaptation, as well as Shakespeare in times of hardship. 

Topics could range from the art and power of story-telling, legends and tales, or the drive to adapt stories. Papers may also cover the topics of playmaking in times of war, plague, and other hardships, digital or virtual playmaking, and the importance of theatre during these times. We welcome unique interpretations of these themes.

MLA Just-in-Time Session: Covid-19 and Early Modern Protest

updated: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 - 12:20pm
Nikki Roulo/University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2020

On April 30th, 2020, protesters flocked into Lansing, MI, to contest stay-at-home orders that slowed the spread of Covid-19. A number of the crowd carried assault rifles, Confederate flags, swastikas and nooses. Such displays of racism and violence prompt a questioning of the “right to protest” and “allowed” voice, especially when such displays harm people.

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