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Locating Meaning in Early Modern Allegory - ACLA April 4-7, 2013 - University of Toronto

updated: 
Monday, October 1, 2012 - 11:47am
Danielle St. Hilaire and Jeffery Stoyanoff / Duquesne University

The early modern period in Europe saw a series of changes to the picture of the globe—both to its surface, with the "discoveries" of New World exploration, and to its place in the universe, with the period's astronomical revelations. These discoveries, along with the crisis of interiority that led to and was fueled by the Protestant Reformation, unsettled older epistemological assumptions and prompted new inquiries into the locus of meaning in the world.

call for papers and creative writing

updated: 
Monday, October 1, 2012 - 5:17am
the quint: an interdisciplinary quarterly from the north

Catalogued at the National Library in Ottawa, Canada, the quint: an interdisciplinary quarterly from the north is now in its fifth year of publication. Publishing top quality academic articles, poetry, fiction, reviews, and art, the quint welcomes a diversity of disciplines and methodologies from the humanities and social sciences. The quint's seventeenth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books. The deadline for this call is 15th November 2012—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time. Links to the quint are accessible at www.ucn.ca.

[UPDATE] Shakespeare's Tongue (deadline extended)

updated: 
Sunday, September 30, 2012 - 3:57pm
French Shakespeare Society

(Our email was unavailable for a few days, so we have decided to extend the deadline until October 15.)

« Shakespeare's tongue » – Call for papers for the 2013 French Shakespeare Society Congress (SFS)
Rationale by Jean-Michel Déprats and Nathalie Vienne-Guerrin

The 2013 Conference of the French Shakespeare Society will take place in Paris in March 21-23, 2013.

Enter Shakespeare, painted full of tongues…

The Work of Return (edited collection)

updated: 
Saturday, September 29, 2012 - 7:02pm
Nadine Attewell (McMaster University); Sarah Trimble (University of Toronto)

The Work of Return (edited collection)

This Rough Magic [UPDATE] - Teaching Medieval and Renaissance Lit. - 11/16/12

updated: 
Saturday, September 29, 2012 - 11:10am
This Rough Magic (www.thisroughmagic.org)

This Rough Magic (www.thisroughmagic.org) is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

We are seeking academic, teachable articles that focus on, but are not limited to, the following categories:

•Authorship
•Genre Issues
•Narrative Structure
•Poetry
•Drama
•Epic
•Nation/Empire/Class
•Economics
•History
•Religion
•Superstition
•Philosophy and Rhetoric
•Race/Ethnicity
•Multi-Culturalism
•Gender
•Sexuality
•Art

Living By The Code: An Exploration of Morality and Ethics, March 8-10, 2013

updated: 
Friday, September 28, 2012 - 10:33pm
Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s English Graduate Organization

Morality and ethics shape our lives in a plethora of ways. It affects how individuals act on a daily basis, interact with one another, and—most tellingly—act when faced with important decisions that could influence culture and history. Personal morals are not only indicators of who a person truly is but also of their perceptions on their society, life and death, and quality and worth of life.

Fat Representations: A Special Issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 4:47pm
Interdisciplinary Humanities/Humanities Education and Research Association

The peer-reviewed journal Interdisciplinary Humanities invites submissions of scholarly articles, nonfiction essays, and book and film reviews that explore representations and theories of fat, gender and eating.
Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
Eating: Representations of eating in popular culture, literature, film, and art. How is eating positioned as an activity of significance/insignificance? How is eating gendered, raced, classed, sexed, etc? What are the linkages between eating and identity, and how are these connections theorized?

Pride and Humility: A Special Issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 4:32pm
Interdisciplinary Humanities/Humanities Education and Research Association

From the rage of Achilles to Priam's subservient pleadings for Hector's body, from the conceit of King Lear to the meekness of Cordelia, from the terribilità of Michelangelo's Moses to the earthy nobility of Van Gogh's Potato Eaters, from the detachment of Lao Tzu to the powerful assertions of Nietzsche, and from the pride punished in Dante's Purgatory to the pride celebrated by Michael Eric Dyson; writers, thinkers, and artists through the ages have addressed fundamental questions about the nature of pride and humility.

Galaxy: International Multidisciplinary Research journal

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 3:45pm
Galaxy: International Multidisciplinary Research journal

Call for Papers: Deadline November 30, 2012
Galaxy: International Multidisciplinary Research Journal (ISSN 2278 – 9529)
Research Papers are invited for January 2013 Issue (Vol. II. Issue. I)

Journal is Indexed/ Included in:
DOAJ
EBSCO
IndexCopernicus
Duotrope
Every Writer's Resource
Library of Congress
The Knowledge Network
National Library of Sweden

CONTACT INFORMATION:

For inquiries: galaxyimrj@gmail.com

For submissions: galaxyimrj@gmail.com

Website: http://www.galaxyimrj.com/

[CORRECTION] - The Arts of Attention Conference, Budapest, Hungary (Deadline for proposals: Jan. 31, 2013)

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 10:28am
Károli Gáspár University

Attention is increasingly regarded by cognitive scientists and evolutionary anthropologists as a faculty whose development in human animals is constitutive of what it means to be human. This conference invites papers on (1) the ways in which literary texts encode this faculty (tropologically, discoursively, narratologically, ideologically), and/or (2) the ways in which theories of reading have recognized or underestimated the arts and techniques of attention. We particularly invite contributions developing or dismissing the suggestion that literature offers privileged insight into the function of attention as a possibility condition for the imagination, for agency, and for community formation.

Invention vs. Mimesis -- Inaugural Issue of the Rat's Mouth Review

updated: 
Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 1:12pm
The Rat's Mouth Review - Graduate Literary Journal of Florida Atlantic University

In 1913, Ezra Pound articulated the literary imperative for the modernists' age: "Any work of art which is not a beginning, an invention, a discovery is of little worth," and later urged artists to "Make it New." Conversely, the Hebraic King Solomon wrote, "What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun" (Ecc. 1:9 NIV).

The Arts of Attention Conference, Budapest, Hungary (Deadline for proposals: Jan. 31, 2013)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 3:29am
Károli Gáspár University

Attention is increasingly regarded by cognitive scientists and evolutionary anthropologists as a faculty whose development in human animals is constitutive of what it means to be human. This conference invites papers on (1) the ways in which literary texts encode this faculty (tropologically, discoursively, narratologically, ideologically), and/or (2) the ways in which theories of reading have recognized or underestimated the arts and techniques of attention. We particularly invite contributions developing or dismissing the suggestion that literature offers privileged insight into the function of attention as a possibility condition for the imagination, for agency, and for community formation.

Music and Diplomacy, March 1-2, 2013 -- Deadline: November 19, 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 7:01pm
Tufts University (Center for the Humanities) / Harvard University (Mahindra Humanities Center)

How does music (its concepts, practices, and institutions) shape the exercise of diplomacy, the pursuit of power, and the conduct of international relations? We are pleased to announce an interdisciplinary conference, to be held at the Center for the Humanities at Tufts University and the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard University on March 1 and 2, 2013.

[UPDATE] "The Ambassadorship of Literature" Deadline Extended Oct. 1

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2012 - 6:30pm
New York University

"The Ambassadorship of Literature" – a two-day symposium at New York University, 2-3 November 2012

The figure of the diplomat has received relatively little consideration in the study of transnational literature. We are organizing a symposium on diplomacy and literature that will bring together scholars and practitioners to address the relationship between embodied statecraft and the literary voice in realms of extraterritorial jurisdiction. As agents of mediation, alert to linguistic ambivalence, the ambassador and the author alike fulfill a privileged role of joining and compromise, of mediation and experimentation at the points where cultures and languages meet.

Nature in the Renaissance (for CEA April 4-6, 2013/ abstracts due by 11/1)

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2012 - 3:47pm
Lynne M. Simpson / College English Association

The College English Association, a collegial gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on "Nature in the Renaissance" for our 44th annual conference in Savannah. Essays might usefully explore the construction of human nature in 16th and 17th century British literature or the "nature" of the period itself or its rich and varied literature. How is the natural world represented? What is the nature of familial or social bonds? What constitutes "natural" and therefore normative behavior, belief, or philosophy? Or how does the literature depict that which is "unnatural" or abnormal? Please submit your proposal on-line at http://www.cea-web.org.

CEA-MAG Annual Spring Conference 2013 - Abstracts due 12/15/12

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2012 - 2:45pm
"Nature and Artifice," College English Association - Middle Atlantic Group

College English Association - Middle Atlantic Group
ANNUAL SPRING CONFERENCE 2013
Call for Papers
"Nature and Artifice"
9 March 2013
Keynote Speaker: Performance Poet and Writer Linda Joy Burke

Location: Montgomery College, Rockville, MD

Filming this Insubstantial Pageant: Medieval and Renaissance Drama on Film (Abstracts due Sept. 30)

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2012 - 7:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association (conference Mar. 2013)

This panel seeks papers about film adaptations of medieval and Renaissance English drama, both in English-speaking countries and around the world. The NeMLA conference will be held in Boston in March, 2013. Papers might compare different adaptations of the same play, discuss problems associated with the notion of fidelity to text or of relocating a play in a different historical or cultural milieu, or consider the effectiveness for use in scholarly work or in the classroom. We seek investigation of continuities across disciplines: medieval/Renaissance, cinema studies/literature. What is at stake in these adaptations? What do these directors, writers, performers, and audiences bring to the table?

26th Annual GAFIS Symposium at UW-Madison: (Dis)illusion, April 12th-13th 2013

updated: 
Sunday, September 23, 2012 - 9:59pm
GAFIS (Graduate Association of French & Italian Students), University of Wisconsin-Madison

Illusion is commonly defined as a false idea or belief, often the product of misperception or deception, intentional or otherwise. Its etymological basis in the Latin verb illudere reveals an element of mockery that is evidently lost in the modern connotation of illusion and yet remains, arguably, in that intriguing phase of disillusion that often follows it. How does one distinguish illusion from reality? How do our evolving perceptions of the world around us affect our understanding of self and the human condition? Is disillusion a necessary evil, or an essential part of this understanding as it leads to new possibilities for development and discovery?

"I Live Here!: Redefining and Negotiating Notions of Public and Private" Feb 22-23, 2013

updated: 
Sunday, September 23, 2012 - 9:39pm
North Carolina State Association of English Graduate Students

Call For Papers – "I Live Here!: Redefining and Negotiating Notions of Public and Private"
NC State English Graduate Conference
Conference Dates: Feb 22-23, 2013
Abstracts Due: November 15, 2012
contact email: aegs.conference@gmail.com

The Association of English Graduate Students at North Carolina State University is pleased to announce the call for papers for our fourth annual graduate student conference in the humanities, which will be held February 22-23, 2013 at Tompkins Hall in Raleigh, NC.

[UPDATE] CFP to Lights: The MESSA Journal, A Graduate Publication from the University of Chicago (5pm, October 5th, 2012)

updated: 
Saturday, September 22, 2012 - 6:06pm
University of Chicago Middle Eastern Studies Students Association (Center for Middle Eastern Studies)

We invite Master's students from all departments to submit work on a range of topics related to Middle Eastern studies. We encourage papers that explore the political, linguistic, and cultural significance of the Middle East that transcend limitations across formal/generic cultural, ideological boundaries, and/or within varying aesthetic approaches. Book reviews, critical, analytic, creative fiction, creative nonfiction, photographic, artistic, narrative, and poetic pieces related to Middle Eastern studies are welcome.

Deadline: Friday, Oct. 5, 2012, 5pm

Please send submissions electronically to:
uchicagomessalights@gmail.com

Theatre Survey - CFP (Special Issue on Microhistory)

updated: 
Saturday, September 22, 2012 - 12:28pm
Esther Kim Lee, Editor of Theatre Survey

Call for Papers

Theatre Survey

Special Issue edited by guest editor, Peter A. Davis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

"Theatre History as Microhistory"

Deadline Extended to Dec. 1st for Abstract Submissions!

updated: 
Saturday, September 22, 2012 - 7:16am
International Conference on Medieval & Renaissance Thought, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas

The International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought, featuring Dr. Richard North as keynote speaker, will be held on the beautiful campus of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.

You are invited to send your 250-300-word abstract to Dr. Darci Hill, Conference Coordinator, on any topic dealing with Medieval and/or Renaissance thought. If you would like to propose a special session, yu are welcome to do that as well. We welcome papers, posters, and performances on any aspect of this time period. Papers dealing with language and linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, history, art, theater, and dance are all equally welcome.

December 1st: New deadline for submission of abtracts, including special sessions

[UPDATE] CFP: Body and Technology Conference: EXTENDED DEADLINE

updated: 
Friday, September 21, 2012 - 4:24pm
Center for Body, Mind, and Culture at Florida Atlantic University

Body and Technology: Instruments of Somaesthetics

The Center for Body, Mind, and Culture invites proposals for papers to be presented at a 3-day conference, January 24-26, 2013, at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton.

[UPDATE]Materiality of Devotion and Piety: The Middle Ages and Beyond

updated: 
Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 3:38pm
Purdue University/ Indiana Medieval Graduate Consortium

"The hooly blisful martyr for to seke," is the alleged goal for the pilgrimage that structures Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. What remains under-discussed is the actual goal of the Canterbury pilgrimage, or any other medieval pilgrimage: the pilgrims seek not "the hooly blissful martyr" himself, but things related to him—hair shirt, body parts, or any other object related to the saint and available for view. Devotion in the Middle Ages (Christian and non-Christian) took a tangible, material form that was considered equally important as the saints, deity, or feelings of devotion itself. Such material manifestations of devotion continued to evolve throughout the Middle Ages and beyond.

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