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CFP Deadline Extended: Women and Agency: Transnational Perspectives, c.1450-1790

updated: 
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 10:38am
Virtual Symposium, University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

This two-day interdisciplinary symposium invites scholars to examine early modern women’s agency from a transnational perspective. Conversations about women’s agency continue to ripple across the world, from new, passionate campaigns in Mexico and Poland that have fought to address feminicide and sexual violence, to the Women’s Marches, which have annually inspired global response. Now, we turn with fresh urgency to early modern women’s participation in intellectual and literary cultures that bridged regional, national, and transnational divides.

Religious Dispute and Toleration in Early Modern Literature and History.

updated: 
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 7:22am
University Toulouse-Jean Jaurès (France)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 26, 2021

 

 

Appel à communications : Dispute et tolérance religieuse dans l’Angleterre de la Renaissance / Religious Dispute and Toleration in Early Modern English Literature and History. En ligne / Online (4 juin 2021 / 4th June 2021).

=> Please scroll down for English version

Shakespeare in Fiction

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 10:51am
Comparative Drama Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

“Shakespeare in Fiction”

Comparative Drama Conference

Orlando, FL, October 14-16, 2021

Deadline: April 1, 2021

 

Omission

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 10:51am
Patrick Gill, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 12, 2021

Omission as the purposeful withholding of a component from a text or other work of art, is an aesthetic practice looking back on a long history. From the simple statement to the effect that a particular idea cannot be adequately expressed, via the deliberate practice of choosing which scenes not to represent on stage, to the sudden collapse of a text into an unexpected silence, omission can be a powerful aesthetic strategy. Be it through deliberate incompletion, through the absence of language or characters, or through a dearth of contextual information leaving an abundance of interpretive gaps, such instances of omission are based on three main ideas:

Resilience, Resistance and Renewal in the Medieval and Early Modern World

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 10:44am
UCLA Medieval and Early Modern Graduate Student Association (MEMSA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 1, 2021

The global medieval and early modern world (broadly considered, c. 900-1750) underwent myriad profound changes, from devastating famines, plagues, and wars to an increased entanglement of the continents, economic transformations, and technological and scientific developments. These changes were often accompanied by calls for the reshaping of the institutions and structures – political, religious, intellectual, etc. – which undergirded societies’ approach to these challenges, encompassing such responses as resistance, resilience, and renewal. 

Ordinary Oralities: Everyday Voices in History

updated: 
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 10:23am
Jan Schroeder / Carleton University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Ordinary Oralities: Everyday Voices in History

Edited by Josephine Hoegaerts and Jan Schroeder

 

MLA 2022 CFP: Insurrection, Tyranny, and Resistance (guaranteed panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 2:18pm
Modern Language Association CLCS Renaissance and Early Modern
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, March 20, 2021

The CLCS Renaissance/Early Modern forum of the MLA invites paper proposals for a guaranteed session at MLA 2022 (Washington, D.C., 6-9 January 2022).  We plan a panel on insurrection, tyranny, and resistance in a wide range of early modern contexts.  What political theories and literary traditions shape early modern writers’ understandings?  How do literary texts themselves respond to contemporary events, imagine alternative futures, and transform current conversations?  We particularly welcome comparative and transnational perspectives.  Please send 250-word abstracts and brief CVs to Penelope Anderson pea@indiana.edu by 20 March 2021.

 

Seminar: Shakespeare in Second and Foreign Language Learning

updated: 
Monday, February 1, 2021 - 8:22am
European Shakespeare Research Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 15, 2021

 DEADLINE EXTENDED !!!

European Shakepeare Research Association Conference 2021

3-6 June 2021: VIRTUAL

Call for Seminar Papers: Shakespeare in Second and Foreign Language Learning

Seminar: Shakespeare and the Nature of Utopia/Utopian Nature

updated: 
Monday, February 1, 2021 - 8:22am
European Shakespeare Research Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 15, 2021

Deadline Extended !!

European Shakepeare Research Association Conference 2021

3-6 June 2021: VIRTUAL

Call for Seminar Papers: Shakespeare and the Nature of Utopia/Utopian Nature

Making Sense: The Construction of Feeling in the Atlantic World

updated: 
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 7:13am
Nikki Roulo and Shawn Welch
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 1, 2021

In The Temple (1633), George Herbert observes that “broken bones may joy,/ And tune together in a well-set song.” Here, Herbert observes the interplay between ailments that affect both the spiritual and physical senses. Senses - understood to be those faculties that acquire knowledge vis-à-vis experience - serve as a shared vocabulary informing both spiritual (i.e., transcendent, religious) and physical (i.e., materialistic, naturalistic) means of treatment. But even in our own day, such connections among theories of sense, spiritual and physical illnesses, and their treatments reconfigure what we mean by “healing” in medical discourses. 

 

On Going: figuring journey, position and place

updated: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 1:03pm
Christian Literary Studies Group, Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 31, 2021

Day conference
Corpus Christi College, Oxford, UK, Saturday 6 November 2021 
We are looking for papers which consider journeying, place and the way as tropes in ancient or modern texts, and we look especially for associations with Christian and Biblical themes.

Papers normally have a reading time of about 20 minutes, and are followed by a few minutes of discussion. They are offered for publication in The Glass and subsequently on the CLSG website.

The deadline for offering a paper is 31 May 2021. Send a provisional title and a few lines on how you will tackle your topic. Email Dr Roger Kojecký, secretary@clsg.org

The Experience of Loneliness in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

updated: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 11:45am
University of Birmingham
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

The Experience of Loneliness in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries  Online ConferenceUniversity of Birmingham, UK29–30 June 2021  Keynote Speakers:  Professor Helen Wilcox (Bangor University)Dr Jenni Hyde (Lancaster University)   ***   John Worthington, Church of England clergyman and close associate of the Cambridge Platonists, complained of isolation from fellow scholars in his rectory at the small village of Ingoldsby, Lincolnshire, in the 1660s.

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference CFP: Drama and Society (Nov. 11-14 2021)

updated: 
Friday, January 22, 2021 - 1:58pm
Kimberly Jew, University of Utah
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

 

PAMLA 2021 LAS VEGAS: "CITY OF GOD, CITY OF DESTRUCTION" (Thursday, November 11 - Sunday, November 14, 2021 at Sahara Las Vegas Hotel, hosted by University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

 

Session: Drama and Society

Contacts: Kimberly Jew, University of Utah (kimberly.jew@utah.edu) & Judith Saunders (judith.saunders1@gmail.com)

Shakespeare and Music Seminar

updated: 
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 10:49am
European Shakespeare Research Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 1, 2021

European Shakespeare Research Association – Virtual International Conference

Athens, Greece, 3-6 June 2021

https://esra2021.gr/

 

Shakespeare and Music: “Where should this music be? I’ th’ air or th’ earth?”

Supported by the RMA Shakespeare and Music Study Group

 

Michelle Assay1, Alina Bottez2, David Fanning3

1University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom; 2University of Bucharest, Romania; 3University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Corporeal Creations: Bodily Figurations of Creativity (Online Workshop)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2021 - 2:43pm
University of Tübingen (CRC 1391)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 18, 2021

From John Gower’s account of Robert Grosseteste’s construction of a talking head to George Herbert’s depiction of the heart as a place for divine encounters; from Ben Jonson’s pride in his literary offspring to Victor Frankenstein’s horrified reaction to the physical reality of his own creation, creativity has long been thought of in bodily terms. Imagery centered on the human body – and, frequently, on its procreative propensities – serves to configure the relationship between creator and creation or to describe interpersonal exchange and mutual dependence; bodily metaphors are useful both in celebrating human achievements and castigating Promethean pride and solipsistic self-involvement.

Shakespeare and the Closure of Theatres

updated: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2021 - 11:23am
Gabriel Egan / De Montfort University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 22, 2021

A one-day international online conference on 22 April 2021

The English Research Institute at De Montfort University in Leicester, England, is running a one-day international conference to reflect on closure of theatres in Shakespeare's time and our own.

It is well known that the theatres of Shakespeare's time repeatedly had to close as part of sensible precautions against the spread of the most serious communicable disease of the day: the plague. To stop the disease spreading, early moderns had to practise social distancing; without it a playgoer might bring home from the theatre more than just new ideas and ways of speaking.

Shakespeare, Eastern Europe, and Cultural Influence

updated: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2021 - 10:55am
Natalia Khomenko / York University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

This seminar is part of the World Shakespeare Congress, planned as a fully virtual event for July 18-24, 2021. We invite investigations of Eastern Europe as a node in global engagements with the Shakespearean canon and with Shakespeare as cultural capital, ranging from the early modern English playing companies’ presence in Eastern Europe and early Eastern European adaptations of Shakespeare’s works, to the global influence of twentieth-century Eastern European studies and productions. 

Marvell Society Meeting @ SCRC 2021 (virtual)

updated: 
Friday, December 18, 2020 - 11:36am
Andrew Marvell Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 28, 2020

https://marvell.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/2020/10/20/cfp-scrc-2021-virtual-con...

Exploring the Renaissance 2021: An International Conference, March 25-27

The Andrew Marvell Society invites proposals for 15- to 20-minute papers to be presented at the 2021 South Central Renaissance Conference (SCRC) on any aspect of Marvell studies. Proposals are welcomed on all topics.

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism

updated: 
Thursday, December 10, 2020 - 11:36am
The Warburg Institute, University of London
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 16, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism

 

An online conference: Friday 3 September 2021

The Warburg Institute

 

CFP: Wooden O Symposium

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020 - 2:04am
Southern Utah University/Utah Shakespeare Festival
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 1, 2021

The Wooden O Symposium is a cross-disciplinary conference exploring Medieval through Early Modern Studies, through the text and performance of Shakespeare’s plays. Scholars from all disciplines are encouraged to submit papers that offer insights and new ideas springing from the era of William Shakespeare. His plays are replete with the language, thoughts, and arts of the Renaissance and Western culture and represent an inexhaustible source for creative ideas and research.

Shakespeare and the Closure of Theatres

updated: 
Monday, November 9, 2020 - 12:48pm
De Montfort University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 22, 2021

De Montfort University in Leicester, England, will be hosting on 22 April 2021 a virtual conference reflecting on the closure of theatres in Shakespeare's time and our own. We welcome papers on a range of responses to the closures, including those by writers (Shakespeare and others), playgoers, patrons, and civil and state authorities, some of whom welcomed and some lamented the loss of public theatre.

Reminder: CFP - Edited Book on "Theatre-fiction"

updated: 
Friday, October 23, 2020 - 1:31pm
Dr. Graham Wolfe / National University of Singapore
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 1, 2020

CFP: “Theatre-Fiction”

Abstracts: November 1, 2020

Seeking proposals for an edited book of chapters on “theatre-fiction”, i.e. novels and stories about theatre.

Stranger Forms: Translating the Unusual and Minor of Early Modernity (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 11:38am
Laura Francis and Sara Stamatiades - Cornell University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

While canonical works like Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra’s Don Quixote have enjoyed rich histories of translation, minor texts rarely see as much activity. Even for famous authors, unusual forms may not see the light of day at all. Take Cervantes’ own entremeses, for example: a kind of theatrical interlude prevalent in Golden Age Spain, these short texts have attracted only a handful of translations compared to the Quixote’s hundreds. Carrying out the author’s own biting remark that he wrote dramatic pieces never to be dramatized, the lack of translation only reinforces the already problematic centering of canonical texts. Unavailability across languages ingrains the marginal status of other works and, with them, the marginal figures they represent.

OA Journal Translat Library is Accepting Submissions

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 10:00am
Translat Library - University of Massachusetts Amherst
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 1, 2021

Call for Papers -- Translat Library is accepting submissions.

Translat Library is a new open access journal devoted to the literary culture of Europe (1200-1600), with an emphasis on vernacular translations, the Romance letters, and the Latin tradition. Translat Library publishes short rigorous essays contributing new documentation and editions of unpublished texts.

“Shakespeare’s Difficult Pleasures: New Essays on Carnival, Philosophy, and Moral Agency in honor of Michael Bristol”

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 10:54am
J. F. Bernard Champlain College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 6, 2020

This collection aims to celebrate the work and influence of Michael Bristol by producing new scholarship on Shakespeare, early modern theater, and their enduring and complicated legacy in our modern world. Bristol’s criticism has left a profound impact on the fields on Shakespeare and early modern studies, in particular as it relates to questions of dramatic agency, theory and philosophy, to matters pertaining to the carnivalesque body, as well as to ideas of cultural production.

 

Call for book reviewers

updated: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 5:23pm
Religion and the Arts, Boston College
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 1, 2021

Religion and the Arts, a peer-reviewed journal edited at Boston College and published by Brill of the Netherlands, is looking for writers with professional experience and an advanced degree to write individual book reviews and combined review-essays in the fields of religion and literature, poetry, music, dance, architecture, film, and art history. Our reviewers are academics, independent scholars, writers, poets, artists, teachers, and clergy. 

 

Please send a short bio and vita to relarts@bc.edu describing your education, publications, and current interests: as well as any recent books (2019 forward) you might like to review. 

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