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rhetoric and composition

Beyond Borders, Walls, and Binaries: Creating Inclusive Classroom Spaces

updated: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019 - 9:41am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature's Emerging Scholars Organization
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Panel Proposal for the SSSL Biennial Conference in Fayatteville, AR (February 20-23, 2020)

Sponsored by the Society for the Study of Southern Literature’s Emerging Scholars Organization

Chair: Elizabeth Gardner, Louisiana State University 

Seeking contributions from college writing instructors for The College Writer At-Work Book, 2nd edition, a supplemental workbook that assists students in freshman writing courses, especially in co-requisite models

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:01pm
Paige Huskey, Associate Professor of English / Kendall Hunt Publishing Company
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 29, 2019

The purpose of this supplemental text is to reinforce the concepts that are taught in developmental reading, developmental writing, and freshman orientation courses so that students may continue to address and improve those skills while mastering the material taught in their college-level writing courses.  This text especially works well used in conjunction with a college writing textbook in co-requisite writing models where students are transitioning between both developmental and college-level writing courses in the same term. 

Poster Presentations

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:48pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (Mar 5-8 2020 Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA recognizes the significant contribution of visual presentations to the body of academic study of literature and other linguistic constructions. Posters can relay complex information in ways that text alone cannot. These sessions are an opportunity for NeMLA scholars to share visual representations of their research. The format of the session allows presenters to display their work in a casual setting and to engage in informal conversations with convention participants regarding their work at a designated place and time.

Pulpit, Playhouse and Page: Theatrical and Non-Theatrical Exchange in early modern England

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:25pm
University of Sheffield
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

This two-day conference will explore connections between theatrical and non-theatrical texts in early modern England. Theatrical culture functioned in vibrant relation to both non-theatrical performances (such as sermons and entertainments) and non-dramatic poetry and prose. However, moments of exchange between different genres have too often been obscured by disciplinary silos.

By bringing together scholars with a wide variety of interests the conference will open up new research questions which address the creative exchanges between plays and a wide range of non-theatrical texts and performances.

Topics for consideration might include: 

Catholic Women’s Rhetoric in the United States: Antecedents and Analyses

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:49pm
Elizabethada Wright, University of Minnesota Duluth
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 15, 2019

 

CFP

Proposed Book

Catholic Women’s Rhetoric in the United States: Antecedents and Analyses

Editors: Christina Pinkston and Elizabethada A. Wright

 

 

Media Attention to the Adjunct Plight: Helpful or Harmful?

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:02pm
Maria Plochocki/ NorthEastern Modern Language Associatio
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In the last few years, attention to the adjunct plight, to include poverty-level pay, limited job security, as well as lack of respect for us personally and acknowledgement of our professional credentials and accomplishments, seems to have intensified, reflected in a variety of media outlets, from more liberal ones like The Atlantic and Washington Post to even the ultraconservative Fox News.

Truth-Telling: Experimental Forms in Essay and Poetry, a Reading & Discussion

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:42am
Heather J. Macpherson & Elizabeth Foulke/University of Rhode Island
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019

What does it mean to tell the truth? Are we obligated to inform, or reveal with specificity? What approaches do creative writers apply in disclosing the personal? Does experimentation hide or reveal the truth? Our creative essays and poetry engage with inherent obstacles of truth in life writing. Following a reading of our essays and poetry, we will invite conversation on the ways in which experimental literary forms test the boundaries of truth-telling and subjectivity, and complicate the defining and teaching of genres. 

 

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 4:34pm
University of Texas San Antonio Graduate English Organization
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

Graduate Student Symposium ft. keynote by Ariana Brown

February 22, 2020

University of Texas at San Antonio

 

“Enslaved Black folk couldn’t lift shackled feet,

so instead they shuffled

& invented the cumbia—

& you can’t tell me there aren’t many ways to survive,

to remember the dead,

to make a freedom where there isn’t one.”

Excerpt from Ariana Brown, “Cumbia,” published in the Acentos Review, 2019

(Reminder - due today) For & Against Practice: Approaches to Teaching Professional Writing

updated: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 5:27pm
Callie Ingram & Jiwon Ohm / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This roundtable will provide a forum for participants to discuss and analyze their experiences and offer suggestions for teaching the multi-major professional writing course, more commonly referred to as simply “business writing” or “professional writing.” We especially welcome presentations that speak to and offer strategies targeting one of our three major concerns with the course: its decontextualized state, its reliance on non-neutral codes of professionalism, and the lack of pedagogical support often given to its instructors.

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