rhetoric and composition

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CFP: Revisiting Commenting: Genre, Knowledge Transfer, and the Work of Composition (4/25/2009; CCCC 2010, 3/17/10-3/20/10)

updated: 
Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 1:43am
CCCC 2010

The invitation to "revisit, rethink, revise, renew" in the 2010 CCCC Call for Proposals suggests the important work done when Composition was a young field and scholars such as Richard Braddock and Mina Shaughnessy revisited common wisdom about the teaching, learning and practices of writing; their revisitations allowed them to rethink seeming truths and prompted the field to revise our understandings of error, of the thesis, of the teacher's role in the classroom. This panel proposal undertakes a project in the spirit of these earlier revisitations. Specifically, I am seeking papers that revisit and rethink the intersection of commenting and genre in our freshman writing classes in order to renew our conversations about the work of Composition.

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics" Graduate Conference and Event

updated: 
Friday, April 17, 2009 - 11:46am
James B. Carter/ University of Texas at El Paso

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics"

Graduate students in all fields of study are invited to submit 200-word abstracts to the second-annual "El Paso in the Comics" conference and event, to be held on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso, February 23, 2010.

Papers on all aspects of comics scholarship, theory, and pedagogy will be given attention, but those that deal with issues related to artists, creators, characters and/or themes associated with the American Southwest and/or Hispanic/Chicano culture in comics will be given top priority.

CCCC Panel - Wikis and composition

updated: 
Friday, April 17, 2009 - 7:54am
Kerry Dirk/Virginia Tech

Wikis are becoming increasingly common as pedagogical tools in composition classrooms, as the nature of a wiki allows for easy collaboration among students and increased communication beyond the face-to-face classroom.

I'm hoping to put together a CCCC panel that questions and/or explores commonly held assumptions or beliefs about the wiki. Proposals might also explore how elements found in the traditional classroom change when moved to a wiki.

For example:

- How does the collaborative nature of a wiki change writing?

- Is the wiki truly more democratic than a face-to-face classroom?

- What is the relationship between students and teachers when using a wiki?

- How does the level of engagement change?

UPDATE

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 12:30pm
Journal Issue: Professional Studies Review

The deadline for submission of articles to the next issue of Professional Studies Review has been extended to May 15. Please see the CFP in the upenn archive for further information or contact Joseph Marotta at marottaj@stjohns.edu

Cultures of Recession Graduate Conference [Nov. 20& 21, 2009]

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 10:17am
Program in Literature, Duke University


Cultures of Recession
An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference Hosted by The Program in Literature, Duke University
November 20 & 21, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Stanley Aronowitz (CUNY), author of How Class Works and Just Around The Corner: The Paradox of a Jobless Recovery

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

Speaking of Grief: Death and Language in Modernism (MSA 11, 5-8 November 2009, Montréal, Québec, Canada)

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 10:00pm
Daniel Moore (Queen's University, Canada)

If the Holocaust motivated aesthetic theorists and writers to rethink the premise of the literary mode altogether, stated in one form by Theodore Adorno in his 1951 claim that to write "poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric," early-twentieth-century writers tended to respond to the most violent and rife deaths of their time by zeroing in on words themselves. We may find the most prominent meeting of fatality and diction in the modernist period in attacks on languages of militarism and commemoration launched from a host of quarters, in particular by ex-servicemen following the Great War.

Literacy Narrative(s) and Human Dignity; Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC / 4Cs); Deadline 4/22

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 4:53pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University


This panel submission to the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) will examine literacy narratives (broadly defined) that show a link between human dignity and the acquisition or practice of literacy (reading or writing), or the influence of literacy on interpersonal communication and relationships. In particular, we are interested in

*Links (positive or negative) between literacy (the ability to read and/or write) and human dignity

*Portrayals in narrative fiction or creative nonfiction of the acts of reading and writing as a means to understanding of human dignity

*Literate techniques of interaction ("reading" others' actions or personalities) as a means of humanizing or dehumanizing the Other

Re(Viewing) the Landscape of Visual Rhetoric: Topics in Visual Rhetoric; SAMLA Conf. Nov 6-8, 2009; Abstracts Due May 31, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:52am
Mary Hocks, English Dept, Georgia State University

RE(VIEWING) THE LANDSCAPE OF VISUAL RHETORIC: TOPICS IN VISUAL RHETORIC
The SAMLA special session on visual rhetoric welcomes paper, panel, and performance proposals on topics that deal with all aspects of visual rhetoric, such as visual culture and the Web; teaching visual rhetoric in the classroom; image use in blogs; exploring identities with visual rhetoric; visual rhetoric in student writing; (re)presentations of the body; visual rhetoric in politics; visual rhetoric of physical spaces; visual rhetoric and environmental issues; and other relevant topics.

Cultural Consequences of Unmotherhood

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 2:32pm
Nicole Herrera/ University of Akron

Cultural Consequences of Unmotherhood

Scholars in the fields of Anthropology, Biology, Cultural Studies, Economics, English, Gender Studies, History, Medicine, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Women's Studies, and others are engaged in attempting to understand the construction and consequences of motherhood. A woman's physiological ability to conceive, carry, and birth children, the assumption that the ability to raise children is a natural physiological trait, the ideological pressures to do so, the unique duties and responsibilities of motherhood, and subsequent rewards and penalties are just a few of the areas of inquiry found in literature.

[UPDATE] Children's Literature Panel (PAMLA Nov. 6-7, 2009; Call for papers is now closed)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 7:14pm
PAMLA- Tiffany Hutabarat

This panel is open to any paper submissions dealing with the reading, adaptation, pedagogical use or critical interpretation of children's literature.

Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:
Themes in children's literature, past to present
Role of friends and enemies
Adults as villains
Evolving ideologies of children's literature
Classroom use of children's literature (elementary, secondary or higher education curriculums)
Reception of children's literature, past and present
Adaptation of children's literature into film or television
Critical studies on specific genres and/or periods of children's literature

CPF: Apocalyptic Belief and the Internet (Abstracts May 1)

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 5:30pm
Robert Glenn Howard

DEADLINE May 1, 2009

CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTER PROPOSALS
(Please distribute widely, and my apologies for any cross-posting.)

Network Apocalypse: Visions of the End in an Age of Internet Media

Semiotics of Revelation

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 12:41pm
International Association for Semiotic Studies

The roundtable will focus on the semiotic implications of the idea of revelation. What are the characteristics of meaning that is produced, communicated, and received as "revealed"? Are there anthropological, or even bio-logical constants in such characteristics, or do they rather vary according to socio-cultural contexts and historical époques? What terms express the idea of revelation in the different natural languages, and with which semantic connotations? What values are attributed to the idea of a revelation of meaning, and what, on the contrary, to a meaning that is non-revealed? What relations of rupture, or tension, obtain between these different valorizations? Through what narratives is the idea of a revealed meaning elaborated?

New Voices 2009: The Literature and Rhetoric of the Apocalypse (October 22-24, 2009) [GRADUATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 9:26am
New Voices Conference: Georgia State University Graduate English Assoc.

The 10th Annual New Voices Graduate Student Conference focuses on representations of the Apocalypse as they manifest throughout history, across cultures, and in language. The conference committee invites papers dealing with any aspect of mankind's conception of the End-of-Days. Individual papers or panel proposals may center upon any time period and any culture or people. They may furthermore draw thematically from such academic disciplines as literary criticism and theory, poetry, fiction, philosophy, religious studies, medieval and renaissance studies, art history, biblical history, cultural geography, and folklore.

International Multidisciplinary Women's Congress (October 13-16, 2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 5, 2009 - 3:10pm
Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Izmir, TURKEY

Please, note that abstracts of 300 words will be submitted electronically at our website at http://www.imwc2009.org. Deadline for submission of proposals is June 1, 2009.

The IMWC will take place at the Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey between October 13th and 16th, 2009 and the overarching theme for the Congress will be "Change and Empowerment."

The aim of the Congress is to foster communication and collaboration between academicians and to open up a discussion platform for the analysis, development, and exchange of ideas on the following Women-related main topics:

Edited Volume: Harvey Milk and Queer Politics (30/07/09)

updated: 
Saturday, April 4, 2009 - 11:46pm
Edited Volume

The Queer Politics of Harvey Milk: An Edited Collection

"If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door."

- Harvey Milk, "In Case" [Audio Tape]: 1977

"Harvey's life was theater."

- Anne Kronenberg, Oscars interview: 2009

The Artfulness of Play: Bridging Creative and Theoretical Discourses (Sept 25 - 27, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 3, 2009 - 12:28pm
University of Western Ontario, Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism

Children, athletes, actors, and musicians all play. Can academics play too? What do we play? Numerous currents of contemporary thought, from Wittgenstein to Baudrillard and Derrida, highlight play as a site worthy of inquiry. However, play does not (cannot?) have a precise sense or definition, and therefore our aim will be to put ideas into play, to play with them.

Graduate students and artists are invited to participate in an interdisciplinary conference regarding the concept of play. Academic papers, artwork (visual and performance), and film (short and feature length) are welcome.

Re-Viewing Black Mountain College

updated: 
Friday, April 3, 2009 - 9:24am
Brian E. Butler/UNC-Asheville & Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center

Call for papers and panel proposals.
All disciplines invited.

Re-Viewing Black Mountain College
An International Conference
October 9-11, 2009

The legacy of Black Mountain College continues to influence contemporary culture in multiple realms. This conference aims to investigate its history as well as the multiple paths of influence, actual and possible, identifiable in the contemporary world and beyond.

Co-hosted by The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, and
The University of North Carolina, Asheville

SAMLA 2009 Session: Teaching Language and Literature

updated: 
Thursday, April 2, 2009 - 12:37pm
Rachel Luria/ SAMLA

Session Title: Teaching Language and Literature
Open Topic

We welcome papers that deal with any and all issues related to the teaching of language and literature. Proposals may be related to issues such as the language of gender, comics as literature, or teaching new media, but this is not required. Send your inspiring ideas!

By May 1st, please submit proposals of no more than 150 words by email – preferred – to luria@mailbox.sc.edu or by post to University of South Carolina, Arts Institute, Attention: Rachel Luria, 1212 Greene Street/228 Sumwalt, Columbia, SC 29208

Edgar Allan Poe and others

updated: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2009 - 6:28pm
452ºF Journal of Literary Theory and Comparative Literature

On February 20th 2009 we are pleased to announce a Call for Papers to be included in the first issue of our magazine 452ºF.

This is the first call of our magazine, open to everyone holding a degree and willing to take part in our recently launched project.

The procedure for the reception and publishing, always subject to the regulation that can be found in the "Evaluation and Peer Review system", "Style-sheet" and "Legal notice" sections, is the following:

- Deadline for paper submission (full text): April 23rd 2009, and those received afterwards will not be taken into consideration.

- Originals should be submitted to the following email address: revista@452f.com

Spoken Word Conference - 18/09/2009 (Deadline 1/07/2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2009 - 5:52am
Kingston University/Rose Theatre

It was the UK that gave the world 'le chav', first broadcast the social interaction of the inarticulate through reality television and were so busy testing our children in school that we forgot to teach them how to communicate effectively. Now we reap the results: an epidemic of "word poverty" and a widespread lack of communication skills. In response, the government has designated 2011-12 the National Year of Speech, Language and Communication.

Kingston University is proud to announce a new Institute of the Spoken Word, and an associated conference which for the first time brings together all those with an interest in this emerging research agenda.

Our conference will be opened by a distinguished panel of spoken word experts:

Lenses on Composition Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2009 - 9:38pm
Sheryl Fontaine & Steve Westbrook, eds./ Parlor Press

The editors of Lenses on Composition Studies, a new series from Parlor Press, are currently seeking brief book-length manuscripts. We invite prospective authors to write on any topic within the field of composition—e.g., feminism, ethnography, visual rhetoric—provided the work is targeted toward an audience of advanced undergraduates or beginning graduate students who are new to the discipline. Manuscripts should introduce this population of students to the selected topic by providing necessary terminology and historical explanation.

novel

updated: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2009 - 10:25am
shahriar valipour

i would like to apply to your web site in order to submm it for call for papers concerning novels and short stories.
i am an English literature student getting my BA.

[UPDATE]Graduate Symposium--Spatialities--Keynote: Sharon Marcus

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2009 - 3:45pm
Rice University

Shifting Spatialities: The Dynamic Boundaries of Place and Space

Rice Graduate Symposium
October 2-3, 2009
Rice University, Houston, TX

Call For Papers
Submission Deadline: July 1, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Sharon Marcus; Professor of Literature, Columbia University

As the citizen of the nation becomes the consumer of the multinational corporation, our roles as inhabitants of space become increasingly complicated. Our literature, our faith, our bodies all speak to the different ways that we find to occupy the shifting territories of the postmodern landscape. Looking both to the past and future can help us to discover the real and imagined ways our cultures can develop in more richly and defined ways.

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