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special issue of ESQ: Lydia Sigourney and Her Contemporaries

updated: 
Wednesday, December 4, 2019 - 12:35pm
Dr.Mary Louise Kete/ University of Vermont and Dr.Elizabeth Petrino/Fairfield University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 15, 2020

Call for papers for a special issue of ESQ to explore the work of Lydia Sigourney and Her Contemporaries. This issue will be devoted to essays addressing the question of Sigourney within the context of her contemporaries. We welcome new essays discussing her work in the context of other major authors or exploring her role in the historical context from a variety of critical approaches including formalist, theoretical, historical and pedagogical.

British Romanticism and Europe

updated: 
Tuesday, November 26, 2019 - 3:05pm
Patrick Vincent
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 15, 2019

British Romanticism and Europe

5-8 July 2020, Monte Verità conference center, Ascona, Switzerland

Keynote Speakers: Christoph Bode, Biancamaria Fontana, Paul Hamilton, and Nicola Moorby

Oaths, Odes and Orations 1789-1830

updated: 
Tuesday, November 26, 2019 - 3:05pm
London-Paris Romanticism Seminar
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 31, 2020

Oaths, Odes and Orations 1789-1830 

 

2020 Paris Symposium of the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar

 

Ecole Normale Supérieure, rue d’Ulm, Paris

 

 Friday 3-Saturday 4 April 2020

 

Religion and Utopia in American Literature - ALA 2020

updated: 
Friday, November 15, 2019 - 10:54am
American Religion and Literature Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 10, 2020

American Literature Association
San Diego, CA May 21-24

Religion and Utopia in American Literature

Recent scholarship excavates the politics of religions in American literature but has largely left untreated the utopian quality of religion. In many literary texts, religion provides bases for imagining new social relations. Reading religion as utopian invites us to look anew at the multivalent relations between religion and politics in American literature.

Re-visioning Frankenstein: Illustrative, Pictorial, and Digital Adaptations

updated: 
Wednesday, November 6, 2019 - 1:43pm
NASSR (North American Society for the Study of Romanticism)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 10, 2020

This panel will address illustrative, pictorial, and digital treatments and adaptations of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. The novel has a 195-year history of illustration and depiction in a wide range of visual arts, media, and technologies—from the 1823 cover of Richard Brinsley Peake’s play Presumption to the first issue of the comic series Mary Shelley, Monster Hunter (February 2019). The novel’s “hyperadaptability” in visual form, to adopt Dennis Perry’s term, extends to a wide range of modes.

British Women Writers Conference 2020: Supernatural Visions

updated: 
Monday, December 2, 2019 - 7:47pm
Indu Ohri / British Women Writers Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 7, 2019

Seeking paper abstracts for the panel “Supernatural Visions” at the British Women Writers Conference (BWWC) in Forth Worth, Texas, from March 5-7, 2020. The panel organizer invites submissions that analyze works by 18th and 19th-century women writers that explore ghost-seeing, supernatural visions, and the invisible. In recent years, scholars such as Shane McCorristine, Srdjan Smajic, and Sarah Willburn have explored the significance of ghost-seeing in England during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Washington Irving and the Theater (ALA 2020)

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 7:06am
The Washington Irving Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

The Washington Irving Society invites proposals for a panel connecting Washington Irving and his contemporaries to the theater. As a native New Yorker, Irving was a lifelong theater goer and even aspired to become a playwright while living abroad. His relationship with playwright John Howard Payne and Frankenstein author Mary Shelley, in fact, developed during this time in England when he attempted to write for the theater. As we continue to celebrate the 200th anniversary of The Sketch Book (1819-1820), stage performances of stories from the collection, such as “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” are welcomed, but we open the panel to stage productions of Irving and his other writing, too.

 

Washington Irving and Film (ALA 2020)

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 7:06am
The Washington Irving Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

The Washington Irving Society invites proposals for any topic related to film adaptations of Irving’s biography and texts. Because we continue to celebrate the 200th anniversary of The Sketch Book (1819-1820), dramatizations of stories from the collection, such as “Rip Van Winkle,” “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” and the Christmas stories, are welcomed, but we open the panel to analyses of other texts and representations of Irving as well. From Joseph Jefferson (1829-1905) as Rip Van Winkle on the silent screen to Tim Burton’s Sleepy Hollow (1999) and the more recent television show “Sleepy Hollow” (2013-2017), interpretations of Irving vary dramatically, and we hope to explore what has entertained audiences for more than a century.

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