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Symposium: Byron Among the Poets

updated: 
Wednesday, July 5, 2017 - 2:40pm
All Souls College, Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

Byron Among the Poets

a symposium at All Souls College, University of Oxford

Saturday 13th – Sunday 14th January 2018

In Frankenstein's Wake

updated: 
Wednesday, July 5, 2017 - 2:45pm
Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 29, 2018

To mark the 200th anniversary, in 2018, of Mary Shelley’s novel, we invite articles for a special issue, examining the impact of Shelley’s creation on the development of sf. Following Brian Aldiss’ critical intervention in Billion Year Spree (1973), this is a relationship that has often been explored, so we would like to encourage contributions that investigate the afterlives of Shelley’s novel within the sf genre in new and innovative ways. Topics may include (but are not confined to) the following areas:

Redefining Nation and Nationalism: A post-nineteenth century approach for a modern Medieval Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, July 4, 2017 - 5:37pm
International Congress on Medieval Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 10, 2017

The problematic use of ideas established in nineteenth century, using medieval literature and culture, to define nascent senses of nationalism lingers over the field of Medieval Studies. The nineteenth century saw the construction of Western European national identity using, for example, texts such as the Chanson de Roland, the Nibelungenleid, and the works of Thomas Malory. However, the biography of the French national hero Charlemagne was written by the German Einhard; the German national epic is about a group of Burgundians; and King Arthur has equal ties to his Celtic and French development as he does to his Englishness.

The RES Essay Prize 2017: Final call for entries

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:13am
The Review of English Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

The RES Essay Prize aims to encourage scholarship amongst postgraduate research students in Britain and abroad. The essay can be on any topic of English literature or the English language from the earliest period to the present.

 

The competition is open to anyone studying for a higher degree, or who completed one no earlier than January 2015

 

The winner will receive:

  • Publication of the winning essay in the June 2017 issue of The Review of English Studies
  • £500 worth of OUP books
  • A free year's subscription to The Review of English Studies

*How to enter*

[deadline extended] 2017 ELLAK International Conference [Updated]

updated: 
Saturday, July 15, 2017 - 5:56am
English Language and Literature Association of Korea
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 31, 2017

The 2017 ELLAK International Conference

Seoul National University, South Korea

December 13th–15th, 2017

 

“Narrating Rights: Literary Texts and Human, Nonhuman, and Inhuman Demands”

 

Sterne and Travel Writing: 18th-21st centuries

updated: 
Saturday, July 8, 2017 - 7:33pm
International Laurence Sterne Foundation, Kazimierz Wielki University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 15, 2017

At the 2nd International Laurence Sterne Foundation Conference (26-28 October 2017, Bydgoszcz, Poland) Prof.

[Update] Levinas, the Material, and Ethics (deadline extended)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 11:14am
North American Levinas Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Levinas, the Material, and Ethics

 North American Levinas Society

12th Annual International Conference

Loyola University Chicago

Chicago, IL, USA

July 24-27, 2017 

Plenary Speakers:

Adriaan Peperzak, Loyola University Chicago

Tom Sparrow, Slippery Rock University

Annual Talmudic Lecture: Georges Hansel, SIREL

 

Gendered Ecologies and Nineteenth-Century Women Writers

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:16pm
Northeast MLA Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

If ecology is without nature, as Timothy Morton provocatively argued in 2007, then one may wonder of ecology without the feminine as a corollary. For nature, much like the feminine, has been fetishized, exoticized, and romanticized as a signifier emptied out—a sort of lacuna. If we can be at ease with the gap, vacancy, or interval and, perhaps, theorize about the unfilled space while sorting out the inconsistencies of what it means to represent nature, the feminine, and androgyny, then we might begin to trace the valuable contributions of 19th-century women writers to the development of the term oecologia coined by Ernst Haeckel in 1866 and beyond. 

Feeling Character Spaces

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:21pm
Joshua Gooch, D'Youville College
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

NeMLA Convention, April 12-15, 2018 in Pittsburgh

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