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NeMLA 2022: Walking in the Empire

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:32pm
Vivian Kao/Lawrence Technological University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

NeMLA 2022 (March 10-13, 2022, Baltimore)

Session Title: Walking in the Empire

Session Organizer: Vivian Kao, Lawrence Technological University

Death, Sickness, and Plagues in 19th-century British Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 10:40am
Reyam Rammahi, Independent Scholar
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

The Year Without a Summer in Europe was among the reasons that inspired some nineteenth-century British writers to write novels and poems reflecting on the event and its effects on human relations. Works like Mary Shelley’s The Last Man and Lord Byron’s Darkness are among the examples that describe the feelings resulting from such an event, especially in Shelley’s work, in which many racial and political issues arise from such a crisis. How human beings care about each other in crises and what dilemmas result from such events are the focus of this session, as these issues are closely related to the most recent COVID-19 crisis.

INCS 2022 "Strata"

updated: 
Friday, June 4, 2021 - 11:13am
Interdisciplinary Nineteenth Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 8, 2021

Strata

March 24-27, 2022

Salt Lake City, Utah

 

Conference Session: Community and Isolation in 19th Century England

updated: 
Friday, May 21, 2021 - 5:08pm
SAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 20, 2021

SAMLA—South Atlantic Modern Language Association

Conference 93, Nov. 4-6, 2021, Atlanta

"Social Networks, Social Distances"

 COMMUNITY AND ISOLATION IN 19TH CENTURY ENGLAND

ENGLISH IV (ROMANTIC & VICTORIAN)

 This traditional session welcomes submissions on any aspect of the Conference theme. By June 20, please submit an abstract of 300-500 words, a brief bio, and any A/V or scheduling requests to Dr. Anita Turlington, University of North Georgia, at anita.turlington@ung.edu.

 

Call for book chapters Dark Romanticism: coloniality, class, race and gender outside Europe.

updated: 
Monday, May 17, 2021 - 4:40am
Dr Miguel Gaete
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Not so long ago, the links between Romanticism and vexed issues such as class, gender, or race, were barely explored within Romantic studies, despite that some Romantics embraced very eagerly what today sound like very unacceptable ideas such as the division of humankind into two primary racial groups:  the “culturally superior and beautiful Europeans” on the one hand, and the “Mongols”, namely “the ugly and inferior” Asians, Africans and Americans on the other.[1]

 

Postgraduate English Issue 42: Call for Submissions

updated: 
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 - 11:32am
English Department, Durham University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 28, 2021

Postgraduate English, Durham University’s online peer-reviewed literary journal, has been publishing postgraduate research biannually since the year 2000 and is one of the longest-running online postgraduate literary journals in the world. In recent years the journal has received reprint requests from academic publishers.

Whales and Veils: Obsessions in Melville and Hawthorne

updated: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021 - 12:41pm
University of Lodz, Poland
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Whales and Veils: Obsessions in Melville and Hawthorne

12-14 May 2022

Łódź, Poland

Conference Venue:

University of Łódź

Faculty of Philology

ul. Pomorska 171/173, Łódź

 

Call for Papers

2021 Victorians Institute Conference: Reflections/Refractions: Victorian(ist) Ways of Seeing

updated: 
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 2:24pm
Victorians Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 15, 2021

The Victorians Institute is excited to welcome you to Charlotte, NC on 
October 22-23rd 2021 for our rebooted annual conference: 
“Reflections/Refractions: Victorian(ist) Ways of Seeing." This conference 
seeks essays that explore how Victorians saw their world, how they depicted 
what they saw, and the ways that modern scholars, in turn, see the 
Victorians. Papers or panels on poetry, prose, nonfiction, biography, 
digital humanities, or visual art are welcome, as are presentations on the 
pedagogy and ethics of teaching Victorian literature (either during or not 
during a global pandemic).

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference CFP: British Literature and Culture: Long 19th Century (Nov. 11-14 2021)

updated: 
Friday, March 12, 2021 - 10:32am
Gretchen Bartels, California Baptist University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

PAMLA 2021 LAS VEGAS: "CITY OF GOD, CITY OF DESTRUCTION" (Thursday, November 11 - Sunday, November 14, 2021 at Sahara Las Vegas Hotel, hosted by University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

Session: British Literature and Culture: Long 19th Century

Contacts: Gretchen Bartels, California Baptist University (g.bartels@gmail.com)

Description: Any proposals dealing with 19th century British literature and culture are welcome, with particular consideration granted to papers that engage with the conference theme of "City of God, City of Destruction."

Conference Note:

Literature and Popularity in the Georgian/Regency Era

updated: 
Friday, March 12, 2021 - 10:03am
Margie Burns/SAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2021

LITERATURE AND POPULARITY IN THE GEORGIAN/REGENCY ERA

This traditional panel session welcomes submissions on readership and literature, especially popular literature, during the Georgian or Regency period, approximately 1795 to 1837. Abstracts addressing the conference theme, “Social Networks, Social Distances,” are especially welcome and a good fit for the period, when authors and readers can be seen aligning and networking through books. By June 1, 2021, please submit an abstract of 300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V or scheduling requests to Dr. Margie Burns, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, at mburns@umbc.edu.

Hawthorne at Play: MLA 2022

updated: 
Friday, March 5, 2021 - 5:02pm
Nathaniel Hawthorne Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

The annual conference of the Modern Language Association will be held in Washington, DC on Jan. 6-9, 2022. The Nathaniel Hawthorne Society seeks proposals for the following panel:

Hawthorne at Play

CfP for MLA 2022 “Mattering in the 19thC and Beyond: US Transcendentalisms, Racism, and Repair"

updated: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 11:01am
Margaret Fuller Society
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, March 20, 2021

“Mattering in the 19th C and Beyond: US Transcendentalisms, Racism, and Repair"

Roundtable organized by the Margaret Fuller Society

MLA 2022: Washington, DC, 6 to 9 January

Submission deadline: 20 March 2021

 

How do race, racism, and anti-racism operate among US transcendentalists? What alternative vocabularies and theoretical models have their Black contemporaries and later Black thinkers created? We invite proposals that challenge or reform the legacies of transcendentalism. Potential topics (others are welcome):

 

-     constructions of race

-     systemic racism

-     Black intellectual/aesthetic traditions

-     Black writers/speakers

Ordinary Oralities: Everyday Voices in History

updated: 
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 10:23am
Jan Schroeder / Carleton University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Ordinary Oralities: Everyday Voices in History

Edited by Josephine Hoegaerts and Jan Schroeder

 

Nineteenth-Century Religious Cultures

updated: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 2:10pm
Religion and the Arts
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

For a special double issue to be published in March, 2022. 

 

Papers addressing the plurality of religious cultures in the nineteenth century, including not only Catholicism, Anglicanism, Protestantism, and Judaism, but also Buddhism, Hermeticism,  Native American Religions, Theosophy, Unitarianism, the LDS Church, African-American religion, Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Shakerism, etc., competing and overlapping in nineteenth-century contexts. Papers are welcome in all the arts; incuding literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, liturgy, the textile arts, the decorative arts, music, and dance. 

 

Illustrations, both color and black-and-white, are encouraged. 

 

Proposed Special Session on Domestic Cats in Literature at SAMLA 93

updated: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2021 - 11:51am
Ben P. Robertson / Troy University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Please note that this session is SEPARATE from the conference on domestic cats in literature to be held in June.

 

Proposed Special Session on Domestic Cats in Literature at SAMLA 93

 

Submissions are invited for a proposed special session of 15-minute traditional papers on domestic cats in literature at the 93rd annual conference of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA), scheduled to be held in Atlanta, GA, USA, 4-6 November 2021.

 

Papers may address any aspect of the subject, including—but not limited to—the following:

Conference on Domestic Cats in Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2021 - 11:51am
Ben P. Robertson / Troy University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

Submissions are invited for a scholarly conference on domestic cats in literature to be hosted online 11-12 June 2021 by the Troy University Department of English.

Papers may address any aspect of the subject, including—but not limited to—the following:

Hawthorne Society ALA 2021

updated: 
Wednesday, January 13, 2021 - 12:47am
Nathaniel Hawthorne Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 15, 2021

Hawthorne and Fatherhood

We invite proposals for papers exploring aspects of “Hawthorne and Fatherhood.” This may include, but is not limited to: Hawthorne as father; Julian’s and Rose’s memories of their father; missing fathers (as in Hawthorne’s own); father stand-ins, such as grandfather in "Grandfather’s Chair"; Dimmesdale as deadbeat father or Chillingworth as want-to-be father, leaving his money to Pearl; Coverdale and Hollingsworth avoiding fatherhood, though the latter wants to be some great paternal figure; barren men and husbands, as in The House of Seven Gables; or other fathers in Hawthorne’s shorter fiction.

“Through the Pen of Others: Nineteenth-Century Views of Revolutionary Greece”

updated: 
Wednesday, January 6, 2021 - 4:32pm
NATIONAL AND KAPODISTRIAN UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

“Through the Pen of Others: Nineteenth-Century Views of Revolutionary Greece”

NATIONAL AND KAPODISTRIAN UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 8-11 DECEMBER 2021.

The deadline for proposals has just been extended to 28/2/21.

 

Conference Website:    https://conferences.uoa.gr/e/ellada200flsekpa

CFE: Teaching the Eighteenth Century Now

updated: 
Friday, November 6, 2020 - 8:05pm
Miriam Wallace & Kate Parker, Transits: Literature, Culture, Thought 1650-1850
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Bucknell University’s series, Transits: Literature, Culture, Thought 1650-1850, invites expressions of interest for essays or collections of essays that highlight the scholarship of teaching the long eighteenth century including the Romantic era. Proposals for edited volumes need not have firm commitments from authors at this stage, but should detail possible contributors and topics.

 

William Wordsworth: Persistence, Departure, Resistance (MLA Just-in-Time Session Proposal)

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:40pm
MLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 17, 2020

The MLA has recently opened slots for additional “just-in-time” sessions for this year’s convention (to be held virtually from January 7-10, 2021). The session organizers invite abstracts for 15-minute presentations exploring the work of William Wordsworth in light of this year’s convention theme of ‘persistence.’

 

"For the ankres was expert in swech thyngys": Enclosure in Medieval Literature (1)

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:07pm
Stacie Vos, UC San Diego
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

The 2020 pandemic has required everyone to think about the boundaries of self and body in new ways, but these questions were already at the center of medieval devotional texts from the Ancrene Wisse to the Shewings of Julian of Norwich, and even The Book of Margery Kempe, in which Margery seeks harbor wherever she goes. 

 

This session asks for presentations related to enclosure and isolation in medieval art, history and literature, especially works that influence prose writings in the vernacular. 

 

What did cloistered living offer to nuns and anchoresses, and what did the cloister offer to the outside world?

 

Soil and Superstition: Constructing the Gothic Self

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:10pm
Jenna Sterling, Temple University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Lawrence Buell’s essay “The Ecocritical Insurgency” (1999) claims that “human beings are inescapably biohistorical creatures who construct themselves, at least partially, through encounters with physical environments that they cannot not inhabit.” Precisely two centuries earlier, American writer Charles Brockden Brown advocates for a specifically American gothic tradition; Brown adapts the European gothic to American soil.

NCSA 2021: Rediscovering Nineteenth-Century Studies (Roundtable Session)

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 6:37pm
Benjamin D. O'Dell / Georgia Gwinnett College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

This roundtable invites abstracts for short position papers reflecting on the present state of nineteenth-century studies.  How do recent developments in and around the field change our understanding of the nineteenth-century as a site of inquiry?  Papers might include, but are not limited to, the following:       

NeMLA 2021: Romantic Tradition, Romantic Innovation

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2020 - 3:30pm
L. Adam Mekler/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In his Defence of Poetry, composed in 1821, Percy Shelley asserts the central importance of the poet—a  general term he uses to include creative artists of all types—to the continuing development of civilization, even in the midst of the Industrial Revolution and the associated celebration of the sciences and technology. In praising the poet as the “unacknowledged legislator of the world,” Shelley sounded a call that still resonates two hundred years later, as the importance of the humanities relative to STEM programs continually becomes debated.  Of course, Shelley’s views on poetry were by no means representative of the period.

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