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science and culture

Call for Short Articles - Graduate Journal

updated: 
Tuesday, November 26, 2019 - 3:13pm
Parallèle 67 - Université de Montréal
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 15, 2019

Parallèle 67 was created in 2018 at the initiative of undergraduate and graduate students in the History of Art at the Université de Montréal. Its objectives are to create a space for discussion between visual and material culture, museology, anthropology of art, among many other disciplines; to provide an opportunity for fruitful collaboration between students and students; and finally, to showcase their research. Bilingual, it is intended as a platform that publishes short articles pertaining to issues that are indiscriminate with respect to theoretical approaches, historical periods or geographical regions.

CFP: Technoculture Tenth Anniversary Issue (Vol 10, 2020)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 26, 2019 - 3:05pm
Technoculture: An Online Journal of Technology in Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 31, 2020

For our tenth year anniversary issue, Technoculture is seeking critical essays and creative works from a broad range of academic disciplines that focus on cultural studies of technology, and especially on the future of the study of technology and culture.

Essays and creative works we publish examine the topic technology and society, or, perhaps, technologies and societies. This call is ongoing and open topic, and we encourage a broad definition of technology. Topics could include depictions of technologies that treat a wide range of subjects related to the social sciences and humanities.

Climate, Culture, and Capital: Conversations and Conflicts

updated: 
Monday, January 20, 2020 - 1:24pm
UMass Amherst English Graduate Organization
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Climate, Culture, and Capital: Conversations and Conflicts

April 18, 2020

University of Massachusetts Amherst 

English Graduate Organization Conference

Can the climate crisis be represented? To what ends do art and critique engage with extinction? How can the humanities engage with environmental concerns ensuring the continued visibility of structural inequalities and disparities of power? What is nature? What is the human? 

CFP for Edited Volume on Science and Performance

updated: 
Friday, November 15, 2019 - 10:41am
Meredith Conti and Vivian Appler
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 31, 2020

CFP for Proposed Volume on Science and Performance

From the Curious to the Quantum: Identity, Culture, and the Science Performance

Editors:     Vivian Appler, College of Charleston
            Meredith Conti, University at Buffalo, SUNY

Deadline for Abstracts:  January 31, 2020   
Deadline for Chapters:    December 1, 2020

Poetics of the More-Than-Human World

updated: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 11:43am
Dispatches Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2020

CFP: Poetics of the More -than-Human World: a call for poems, hybrid work, and brief manifestos on ecopoetics, for a special issue of Dispatches(https://www.dispatchespoetrywars.com)to be released inSpring 2020. We are also interested in reviews of relevant work, critical appraisals, and audio-video work, but query first to ecopoetics2020@gmail.com. This issue will lead to a print anthology.

 

Humanities Special Issue "Anthropocene Nonhumanities"

updated: 
Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - 1:32pm
Humanities
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

The mark of humans may now be read in all earthly things, from the strata of the lithosphere to the upper reaches of the stratosphere. The Anthropocene, as many have proposed we call this too human geological and climatological era, calls for a radical reconsideration of the nonhuman world and humanity’s place within it. Human-induced climate change and the sixth extinction have irreparably harmed nonhuman populations and ecosystems, yet humans must also reckon with the destructive climatic forces for which we are in large part responsible. The nonhuman is at once more vulnerable and more destructive than at any time within human history.

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