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London Studies Workshop: Women Walking in the City

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:52pm
London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 23, 2019

Inspired by the journey of Virignia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway and Lauren Elkin’s critical work Flaneuse, this one-day workshop seeks to explore the idiosyncratic journey of various women in the city of London as represented in British fiction. The course will focus on the idea of women in public space and think about the ways in which the city provides women new freedoms to think, to explore and to be. We will look at work by Virginia Woolf, Muriel Spark and Anita Brookner and discuss representations of the city landscape in specific texts. We will also engage with some theories and ideas of the city in modernism and critical theory.

Spaces and Places: 2nd Inclusive Interdisciplinary Conference

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:50pm
Progressive Connexions
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 8, 2019

Saturday 4th April 2020 - Sunday 5th April 2020
Lisbon, Portugal

Every day we move through spaces that have been constructed or delineated somehow to be significant. We recognise and —consciously or unconsciously — react to this significance on a daily or hourly basis, and we draw from a cultural well of knowledge in order to do so.

Modernism and Disability Aesthetics

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:58am
Rafael Hernandez / American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Recent work in the field of disability studies by scholars like Ato Quayson (2007), Tobin Siebers (2010), Maren Linett (2016), and Suzannah Biernoff (2017) has considered modernism’s appropriation of disabled bodies. This seminar thus seeks to better understand the role of disability in modernist literary and visual aesthetics. In particular, we encourage papers that consider how writers and artists borrowed from, mimicked, or otherwise recast disability as uniquely modernist literary and artistic subjects. Secondly, this seminar is interested in the ways modernism was cast as disabled in varied attacks on its aesthetic projects.

Jesuits in Science Fiction: From James Blish to Walter Miller Jr. to today

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:48am
North East Modern Languages Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Roundtable CFP

Annual Northeast Modern Language Association

51st Annual Convention

Boston MA, March 5th - 8th, 2020

Mariott Copley Place

Host Institution: Boston University

 

Jesuits in Science Fiction: From James Blish & Walter Miller Jr. to Today

REMINDER l ACLA March 2020: Oil & Water

updated: 
Saturday, September 21, 2019 - 4:51pm
​Délice Williams
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

Oil is everywhere, and that fact about the material world is generating more and more interest in a range of fields.

ACLA 2020: Literary Diagnosis and the Anti-Medical Humanities

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 9:46pm
Melanie Jones / UCLA (ACLA Panel)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

UPDATE: Work on international and/or non-English authors especially welcome!!

With Health Humanities programs on the rise and medical memoirs flooding our bookshelves, it is easy to forget that the alliances forged between literary representation and medical discourse are new and fragile. Writers from a multitude of traditions have frequently squared off against doctors for the right to diagnostic prominence, particularly in capturing the "essence" of disease and the dis-eased body/mind. Their motivations, meanwhile, have spanned from the starkly political to the intensely personal.

XXII Generative Art International Conference

updated: 
Saturday, September 14, 2019 - 5:18am
ARGENIA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

XXII Generative Art International Conference
deadline for submissions:
September 15, 2019
full name / name of organization:
Generative Design Lab, Argenia Association
contact email:
celestino.soddu@polimi.it
GENERATIVE ART 2019

GA2019 , the 22nd Generative Art Conference, Exhibition, Live Performances
Location: Italy, Rome, Villa Giulia, National Etrurian Museum, the 19, 20 and 21 of December 2019

Art&Science - Image&Space - Music&Poetry - Visionary Scenarios - Infinity&Identity

(E)motion in Changing Worlds (Deadline Extended)

updated: 
Thursday, September 12, 2019 - 5:31pm
The Department of English Literature, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 20, 2019

(E)motion in Changing Worlds

Thessaloniki, Greece, 14-16 May, 2020

Deadline: 20 October 2019

 

Call for Papers

The Department of English Literature of the School of English at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in collaboration with the Hellenic Association for the Study of English (HASE), invite scholars to submit proposals for the international conference (E)motion in Changing Worlds to be held in Thessaloniki, 14-16 May, 2020.

 

CFP 4th Posthuman Global Symposium “POSTHUMAN AGENCY” (NYU April 30-May 2, 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 10:03am
POSTHUMAN GLOBAL SYMPOSIUMS - Conference Series at NYU since 2015
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 31, 2019

The fourth edition of the Series, entitled "Posthuman Agency" will be held at NYU, in New York City, from April 30 to May2nd 2020.

The Call for Papers is now open. Deadline: December 31st 2019

CFP

Identity and Language in Latin American and Caribbean Science Fiction and Speculative Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 10:12pm
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Language has always played a key role in the shaping and sharing of identities. Not only does it have the power to create community among people coming from different geographical locations, but most importantly it influences the way we perceive and make sense of the world. For these reasons, the use of language in science fiction —a genre that offers a critical space for "registering tensions related to the defining of national identity and the modernization process" (Ferreira, 2011)— is important as it enables readers to explore alternative realities. This could also be said about speculative fiction. Thus, this panel addresses concerns over reinvented identities through science fiction and across historical periods.

CRITICAL INSECT STUDIES AND THE LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (1660-1830)

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 2:05pm
Beth Fowkes Tobin and Beth Kowaleski Wallace
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

We are seeking abstracts for an interdisciplinary collection of critical essays exploring insects in the long eighteenth century. 

JOSF Special Issue on Environmental Studies

updated: 
Sunday, September 8, 2019 - 3:25am
MOSF Journal of Science Fiction
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 1, 2020

The MOSF Journal of Science Fiction is accepting submissions for a special issue on environmental studies and science fiction to be released in the summer of 2020. 

Writing STEAM: Composition, STEM, and a New Humanities

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:57pm
Vivian Kao
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Call for contributions to an edited collection

Writing STEAM: Composition, STEM, and a New Humanities

Deadline for Proposal Submissions: September 30, 2019

 

Editors: Dr. Vivian Kao, Assistant Professor of Composition, Department of Humanities, Lawrence Technological University; Dr. Julia Kiernan, Assistant Professor of Communication, Liberal Studies Department, Kettering University

 

Contact email: VKAO@LTU.EDU

 

History and the Time of Speculative Ecology

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:43pm
ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

A decade ago, Dipesh Chakrabarty declared in “The Climate of History: Four Theses” that understanding climate change required a transformation in our concept of history. This seminar poses history as a limit-problem for contemporary literary and critical responses to climate change. How do existing responses, in light of their various theoretical provenances, contend with a phenomenon whose nature is diachronically outside an anthropocentric critical framework and irreducible to the terms and temporalities of human history, economics, and social structuration?  Under the heading “speculative ecology,” our panel aims to bring together literary, theoretical, and historical responses to the ecological crisis of our time.

Urban planning and architectural design for sustainable development

updated: 
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 3:45pm
IEREK
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 21, 2019

The 4th Urban planning and architectural design for sustainable development-UPADSD

Online conference

Is an attempt to ease attending conferences, for professors, authors, and Ph.D. students/scholars

Decay Theory

updated: 
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 3:24pm
American Comparative Literature Association (March 19-22, 2020)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

"Decay Theory" Scholars have recently turned to processes of decay as a way to theorize what has been excluded or marginalized in totalizing formulations of capital, the Anthropocene, and the global. From within these fissures, explorations of decay emerge to challenge hegemonic political orders, tropes of human’s ecological dominance, and ontological or aesthetic stasis. This seminar will bring together these emergent disciplinary perspectives to begin theorizing how decay might reshape our scholarly methods and archives. Decay, we contend, is especially useful to think with because it spans the symbolic (e.g. Francis Fukuyama, Political Order and Political Decay) and the material (e.g.

Technoaesthetics: Ways of Seeing the 21st Century (NEMLA 2020)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2019 - 5:53pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In a letter written to Jacques Derrida in 1982, Gilbert Simondon poses a question to the project of deconstruction: “Why not think about founding and perhaps even provisionally axiomatizing an aesthetico-technics or techno-aesthetics?” Aesthetic thought has for too long remained at the level of subjective contemplation, which effaces any substantive understanding of technology’s effects upon the larger cultural sphere. The technical and the aesthetic, Simondon contends, should instead be understood as a “continuous spectrum” of experience, as each are composed of a “set of sensations” that emerge as matter is transformed, whether by the artist, the engineer, the designer, or the machinist.

Leeds IMC 2020: Lines in the Sand: Ecotones and Polity in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2019 - 9:45am
Andrew M. Richmond
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

From kingdoms staking claims on opposing riverbanks to landowners arguing over a thorny hedge, transitional environments have long formed the foundations for political and social boundaries. Such material anchors in turn may be claimed to demonstrate the natural legitimacy of these borders and the institutions they define. Yet medieval literature, art, and popular culture overflows with depictions of such ecotones – water to land, mountain to plain, forest to field – that test both the permanence and permeability of the categories and divisions humans impose on their surroundings (and themselves).

Writing a Cosmos: European Literature and Popular Astronomy, 1890-1950 (CfP)

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:19am
Christoph Richter
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

By the turn of the twentieth century, the ‘new astronomy’ had developed into a proper scientific discipline, with its own sets of instruments, its own journals, its own jargon, and its own interpretative authority. With the acceleration of new discoveries and insights into stellar phenomena, the emerging mass media ensured that this astronomical knowledge fascinated an even wider audience in the late 19th and early 20th century. At the same time, literature across Europe responded to the fascinating astronomical developments in a variety of modes, styles, and genres.

Stage The Future III: International Conference on Science Fiction Theatre

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 2:36pm
Dr Christos Callow Jr / Cyborphic
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Louise LePage, Lecturer in Theatre (University of York)

Following two successful conferences in the UK, at Royal Holloway, University of London and in Arizona, at Arizona State University, in 2014 and 2015 respectively, Stage the Future returns to the UK for its third conference on science fiction theatre on 6-7 December 2019. We welcome papers, panels, and performances that examine and explore the unique attributes live performance offers to science fiction and those that science fiction offers to live performance.

SEMINAR PROPOSAL: Why work? Technology, magic, and the cultural value of labor

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 12:10pm
American Comparative Literature Association 2020 Annual Meeting
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

 

CFP for seminar proposal to ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association) 2020 annual meeting in Chicago (March 19-22, 2020).

Seminar Title: Why work? Technology, magic, and the cultural value of labor

Climate Change and Comparative Aesthetics

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 10:10am
Rebecca Oh, University of Illinois
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

In 2016 Amitav Ghosh threw down a gauntlet: realism, he asserted, is not adequate to the task of representing climate change. As per the subtitle of The Great Derangement, it is “the unthinkable” both in our recent Holocene past and in the genre of realism. Shortly after, Jesse Oak Taylor called out Ghosh’s dismissal of realism on b2o’s blog while advocating other kinds of serious fiction, like modernism and magical realism, as capable of representing climate change. Most recently, Elizabeth DeLoughrey has asserted that allegory is the form par excellence for representing the Anthropocene.

Edited Collection - The Scientist in Popular Culture

updated: 
Thursday, August 22, 2019 - 12:17pm
Rebecca Janicker, University of Portsmouth
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

From news and documentaries to TV drama and major media franchises, science has become a firm fixture in contemporary media culture. Across these diverse formats, a fascination with the perceived capacity of science – whether in the guise of medicine, criminology, space science or engineering – to transform life in wonderful and fearful ways endures. The figure of the scientist is science made manifest and, though different variants have evolved over the centuries, the scientist has remained a constant presence in Western culture. The last hundred years or so has seen many developments in science and technology and popular culture has kept abreast of these, portraying scientists that respond to the shifting hopes and fears of eager audiences.

NeMLA 2020: Literature, New Media and Perception (Panel)

updated: 
Thursday, August 22, 2019 - 11:31am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

With the invention of photography in the mid-19th century, reality no longer depended on the autonomous interpretation of the subject's view, but was instead objectively perceived and recognizable. Contrary to painting, photography fueled changes in perception and perceived reality by realistically reproducing the object as it exists. Now, the 21st century stands under the aegis of the image, a culture dominated by pictures, visual simulations, illusions, copies, and reproductions—creating an inflection point where visual paradigms compete with and even threaten traditional practices.

Vegetable Avatars: Plants, Identity, and Subjectivity in Literature and the Visual Arts

updated: 
Tuesday, August 20, 2019 - 3:53pm
Pamela Cooper, Shayne Legassie University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

Accepted Panel: NeMLA 2020 --Vegetable Avatars: Plants, Identity and Subjectivity in                                                                             Literature and the Visual Arts

Chairs: Pamela Cooper (UNC at Chapel Hill) & Shayne Legassie (UNC at Chapel Hill)

Format: Panel

Topic Area: Comparative Literature

 

Race/Science/Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, August 20, 2019 - 9:19am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Race/Science/Fiction

 

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