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Imagined Encounters: Historiographies for a New World [Due: 30 January 2011]

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 10:04pm
TAG-Berkeley

Session at the 2011 Theoretical Archaeology Group Meeting, Archaeology of and in the Contemporary World, University of California, Berkeley, 6-8 May 2011

In José Saramago's História do Cerco de Lisboa (1989), a transgressive proofreader alters the course of history with the insertion into a text of a single word, not. Negating a crucial statement in a text on the siege of Lisbon, the proofreader sets out to rewrite history. Archaeologists and art historians by reconstructing objects and audiences produce narratives on visual encounters. Through excavations, primary texts, and artifacts, cultures of reception are articulated and experiences with objects are extrapolated.

[UPDATE] The Second Annual Graduate Symposium on Communication

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 3:13pm
The School of Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication at James Madison University

The CFP for graduate students (both Master's and PhD level) to submit proposals to the graduate symposium described below has been extended.

The Second Annual Graduate Symposium on Communication

Theme: "Communication in the 21st Century: New Media, New Ideas"

Keynote: Carolyn Miller of NC State

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Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and Moving Image [http://www.fcsh.unl.pt/revistas/cjpmi]

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 7:07am
Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image

Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and Moving Image is now accepting submissions for the 2nd issue. Editors welcome articles that fall under the broad rubric of the relations between cinema and philosophy.
Submission deadline: March 1, 2011 (abstracts) and June 1, 2011 (completed papers)

Areas include, but are not limited to:
*philosophy of cinema today
*epistemology and ontology of cinema and of the moving image
*the relationship film studies and philosophy of cinema
* the analytic/continental divide within philosophy of cinema
* new approaches and trends within the philosophy of cinema
*historical approaches to philosophy of cinema and film theory
*cinema as philosophy

[UPDATE/REMINDER] FIRST FICTIONS: CONFERENCE (19-22 JAN 2012); SUBMISSIONS (MARCH 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 5:06am
Peter Boxall, University of Sussex

FIRST FICTIONS

PLEASE NOTE: DATE FOR CONFERENCE AND FESTIVAL HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO JANUARY 2012. AS A RESULT, THE CALL FOR PAPERS HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO MARCH 2011.

Festival and Academic Conference: Thursday 19th - Sunday 22nd January 2012

Confirmed delegates include:
Ian Rankin, Kate Mosse, Jackie Kaye, Elleke Bohemer, Steve Bell, Michael Prodger, Bryan Cheyette, Scott Pack, Nicholas Royle and Isabel Ashdown.

The Monster Inside Us, The Monsters Around Us: Monstrosity and Humanity

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 2:00am
De Montfort University, Leicester

The Monster Inside Us, The Monsters Around Us: Monstrosity and Humanity

A three-day conference
De Montfort University, UK
18, 19, 20 November 2011

Keynote Speakers:
David Punter, University of Bristol
Andy Mousley, De Montfort University, Leicester

Literatures of Modernity Symposium 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 12:45am
Second Annual Literatures of Modernity Symposium, Ryerson University

"It is in its transitoriness that modernity shows itself to be ultimately and most intimately akin to antiquity," Walter Benjamin writes in _The Arcades Project_. For Adorno, modernity was a quality and not a chronology. How is modernity related to temporality? How is modernity related to technology, identity, the city? What are some of the popular icons of modernity? This symposium invites proposals on any aspect of modernity as expressed in literature or culture. In addition to academic proposals, the committee welcomes proposals for creative projects including photography, painting, video, film, or performance.

Leo Bersani, Henry James: Henry James Review; deadline: Mar. 1, 2011

updated: 
Monday, January 24, 2011 - 5:25pm
Henry James Review

Leo Bersani's 1976 A Future for Astyanax: Character and Desire in Literature was, at the time of its publication, a pathbreaking work of literary criticism and theory. The book as a whole, and Bersani's chapter "The Jamesian Lie" (originally published in Partisan Review in 1969) in particular, radically altered understandings of the structures of desire in James. A Future for Astyanax helped open up James Studies to sophisticated psychoanalytic analysis and to what was, at the time, called "Theory." In reading James with Racine, Emily Brontë, Stendhal, Histoire d'O, Gide, and Robert Wilson, Bersani defamiliarized the Henry James of American and Victorian Studies.

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