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Signs, Representations and Other Biases: An International Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:43am
University of Central Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

The sign creates our world and represents our thoughts about this world.
The sign is an enabler, a limiter, and a producer of our biases.
The sign is the trouble.
If all signs are arbitrary, how can we distinguish between the signifier and the signified while using language? How can representation and its analysis be in the same medium? How can arbitrariness be implicated with biases? Do we need a universal metalanguage that can analyse the limits of language? Or have we reached a historical moment of aporia? 

Ubu: Grotesquery in Political Theory (ACLA Chicago)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:41am
Brendan McGillicuddy (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

Michel Foucault opened his 1974 seminars at the Collège de France - published as "Abnormal" - with a series of comments that link his theory of “governmentality” to the aesthetic category of the grotesque.

Decolonizing Growth and Development in Postcolonial Writing (NeMLA 2020 Panel)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Echoing the enlightenment ideals and yet widely considered groundbreaking, the United Nations Declaration on the Right to Development in 1986 proclaimed that “the right to development is an inalienable human right by virtue of which every human person and all peoples are entitled to participate in, contribute to, and enjoy economic, social, cultural and political development, in which all human rights and fundamental freedoms can be fully realized.” As Joseph Slaughter denounces as tautological, this declaration presumed that human rights and freedoms could not be made possible without proper development.

Style: Beyond Form

updated: 
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 9:43pm
ACLA 2020 Chicago
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

This seminar invites papers on stylistic production in any medium and genre, in any period or place.

The Lyric Self and Courtly Traditions

updated: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019 - 11:38pm
American Comparative Literature Association ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019

A new preference for the production and consumption of lyric forms of poetry, over that of more narrative options like the epic, often coincided with a governing body’s establishment of courtly norms and practices. This trend is consistent across a multitude of seemingly disparate cultures. The popularity and refinement of the ghazal during the Ghaznavid dynasty and the sonnet at the Elizabethan court are just two examples of similar formal developments arising within different cultural contexts. Shorter lyrics were often formally rigorous, but also highly customizable, and many of these forms also called for a new emphasis on the construction and expression of self.

UPDATED Writing Bios: Biopolitics in 20th-century Literature and Beyond (Roundtable)

updated: 
Friday, September 13, 2019 - 5:08pm
NeMLA 2020 (Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the biopolitical turn, scholars across disciplines have attempted to make sense of the encounter between life (bios) and politics. This attention paid to the topic of biopolitics shows a cultural ethos that revolves around an awareness of power connected to the body. This roundtable invites papers that analyze how literature engages with biopolitics, particularly in the conceptualizations and depictions of the body in relation to power in 20th- and 21st-century literature. Roundtable participants are encouraged to submit abstracts that engage with the following questions: “How is life (and the body) culturally inscribed with meaning and definition,” and further, “What is a consequence of that inscription?”

DEADLINE EXTENDED: ICMS 2020: Orientations: Gender and Sexuality in Space-time

updated: 
Friday, September 13, 2019 - 3:07pm
Zachary Engledow
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO SEPTEMBER 15th 

Sponsored by the BABEL Working Group and Co-Sponsored by the Society for the Study of Homosexuality in the Middle Ages. 

International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 7-10 2020

Call for Papers – CLOSURE: The Kiel University e-Journal for Comics Studies #7 (November 2020) / Thematic Section: »Eco-Comics: What Grows in the Gutter?«

updated: 
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 10:05am
CLOSURE: The Kiel University E-Journal for Comics Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 25, 2019

Open Section

In the fall of 2019, CLOSURE will once again offer a forum for all facets of comics studies. From literary, cultural, media, social and image research to the sciences and beyond: the seventh edition of CLOSURE continues our ongoing search for the best and most innovative articles and reviews representing the state of the art in comics research. We welcome detailed close readings as much as comics theory and pioneering approaches to the medium — our open section comprises a diverse range of interdisciplinary studies of all things ›comic‹.

 

Thematic Section: »Eco-Comics: What Grows in the Gutter?«

Ethics, Still: Levinas in the 21st Century

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 5:55pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This call is for an accepted roundtable session at the 50th Northeast Modern Language Association convention in Washington, DC, March 21-24, 2019. Please submit abstract (300 word limit) through the NeMLA system: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17239

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Medieval Habits

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 5:52pm
Ryan Lawrence, Cornell University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

ICMS KALAMAZOO 2020: MEDIEVAL HABITS 

This panel invites 15-20 minute papers concerned with medieval notions of habit. 

Trauma Theory in/and Indigenous Literatures

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 11:52am
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

    Trauma is a notoriously slippery concept to identify and comprehend, however, many theorists—-most notably Cathy Caruth in Unclaimed Experience—have argued that literature provides a means of representing and of ‘working-through’ experiences which otherwise have gone “unclaimed.” Absent from literary trauma theories, such as Caruth’s, however, is a consideration of the euro-centric core of theories of trauma. This absence can be attributed to the origins of literary trauma theory that emerged primarily out of Freudian psychoanalytic psychology and/or the deconstructive philosophy of the Yale School and Paul de Man.

Writing without Writing: Fragments and Survivance

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 3:05pm
ACLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Since the nineteenth century to the present, fragmentary writing has been widely deployed in literature and philosophy (i.e. Ernst Bloch, Schlegel, Mallarmé, Adorno, Maurice Blanchot, Kafka, Beckett etc.) as a strategy to disrupt the idea of totality by and through writing. Fragmentary writing as an incomplete totality, bears absent voices and traces and alludes to a whole.

Kazuo Ishiguro and the illusion of the World

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 2:29pm
American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Conference: American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) Annual Meeting, Sheraton Grand Hotel, Chicago, 19-22 March 2020

Seminar: Kazuo Ishiguro and the illusion of the World

Organizers: James Tink (jmtink@g-mail.tohoku-university.jp) and David Huddart (dhuddart@cuhk.edu.hk)

Submit a Paper: https://www.acla.org/kazuo-ishiguro-and-illusion-world

Deadline: 23 September 2019

The Politics of Identity and the Poetics of Liberalism in the Age of Milton

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 1:42pm
Reza Pourmikail / Brandeis University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the 2016 election, there has been much soul searching in certain progressive circles about the role that identity should play in liberal politics in the United States and beyond. Authors as diverse as Kwame Anthony Appiah, Francis Fukuyama, Mark Lilla, and David Wootton have recently urged us to consider the possibility of constructing a form of liberalism in which identity does not necessarily play a central role. In the writings of at least some of these authors, we may discern a desire to recover the heritage of classical liberalism, with its emphasis on abstract individualism and the importance of so-called “negative” freedoms, such as freedom of speech.

The Storytelling of the Disaster (ACLA 2020 Chicago, March 19-22)

updated: 
Friday, September 6, 2019 - 3:58pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

According to Walter Benjamin, “the art of storytelling is coming to an end”; we are losing “the ability to share experiences.” Without storytelling, which was once “a capability that seemed inalienable to us, the securest among our possessions,” we are fragmented into a piece of “information” and isolate ourselves in what is believed to be subjectivity (“The Storyteller”). And yet, in exceptional situations, storytelling appears still possible. For example, when the northeast Japan was struck by the earthquake and tsunami disaster, after initial muteness and banal narrativization by the major media (which was indeed a disaster for storytelling), there emerged stories among the survivors.

Sexual Difference and Cultural Difference_ACLA 2020 Session_ March 18th-22nd, Chicago

updated: 
Friday, September 6, 2019 - 3:38am
Tina Yitian Zhai/ University at Buffalo
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In the trajectory of neoliberalism and an increasingly global marketplace, the necessity of undercutting the Western subsumption of the world is urgent. As Jean-Luc Nancy has argued, however, such a saturation of Western meaning, though potentially catastrophic, is not a forgone conclusion. On the contrary, it is precisely at the limit of the Western notions of telos and subjective agency that a new conception of the world can be collectively understood and created. It is also against such a limit that feminist discourses challenge the universal subject in the name of sexual difference and theories of intersectionality.

The Personal is Academic: Affect and Subjectivity in Research and Pedagogy (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 4:09pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

A recent trend has seen many writers create literary narratives that confront twentieth-century events while inscribing into that past the authors’ contemporary selves (e.g.: Binet 2009; Jablonka 2012; Foenkinos 2014). These biographical meta-narratives seem dictated by the impossibility to construct one’s own subjectivity without facing the very notions of civilization and humanity that our violent pasts have reconfigured.

Call for Translations and Translation Studies Scholarship

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 4:08pm
Translation Review
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 16, 2019

Translation Reviewis a peer-reviewed journal committed to publishing the best new scholarship on all aspects of literary translation studies. Each issue highlights a translator in an interview and features articles and essays on the history, practice, and theory of translation, as well as translations of contemporary international writers into English. 

Please see instructions for authors available at the link:

https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=utrv20&page=instructions

The University We Want ACLA 2020 Seminar (Sheraton Grand Hotel, Chicago, March 19-22, 2020)

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 4:06pm
Ian Butcher (Fanshawe College); Robin Sowards (Chatham University)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

The University We Want

This seminar asks when we let ourselves engage in utopian thinking, what do we want the university to be? We recognize that the university needs to change, but what should we change it into? How should teaching and learning happen? Who should make decisions and how? What should these institutions identify as their mandate, and how should they exist within their community? What might radical approaches rooted in ecologically responsible practices or decolonization look like?

History and the Time of Speculative Ecology

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:43pm
ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

A decade ago, Dipesh Chakrabarty declared in “The Climate of History: Four Theses” that understanding climate change required a transformation in our concept of history. This seminar poses history as a limit-problem for contemporary literary and critical responses to climate change. How do existing responses, in light of their various theoretical provenances, contend with a phenomenon whose nature is diachronically outside an anthropocentric critical framework and irreducible to the terms and temporalities of human history, economics, and social structuration?  Under the heading “speculative ecology,” our panel aims to bring together literary, theoretical, and historical responses to the ecological crisis of our time.

Poetry and Painting: Conversations

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:39pm
Faculty of English, University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

You know how  

I feel about painters. I sometimes think poetry  

only describes.  

                          Frank O’Hara, ‘John Button Birthday’ (1957)

 

The supposed similarity between poetry and painting was famously characterized in Horace's ‘Ars Poetica’ by the dictum ‘ut pictura poesis’ (‘as is painting, so is poetry’). Yet in 1766, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing influentially argued for the limits that condition these different art forms — how could a visual scream ever be rendered linguistically? 

Anglo Saxonica

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:15pm
University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Anglo Saxonica is a multidisciplinary journal that publishes original and innovative research on a variety of issues relevant to the study of English(es), broadly understood both as language and as all the literatures and cultures of the English-speaking world. In so doing, Anglo Saxonica also promotes dialogue among English-speaking geocultural areas. Its editorial policy promotes the thematic cohesion of each volume, open to different academic approaches on current issues in English and American studies, including original research articles, reviews, interviews and selections of creative writing. The journal also publishes special issues with a particular thematic focus that are guest-edited by leading scholars in the field.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Medieval Virtualities (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:10pm
Danielle Allor / Program in Medieval Studies, Rutgers University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Medieval Virtualities (A Roundtable)

A Sponsored Session from the Program in Medieval Studies, Rutgers Univ.

55th International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS Kalamazoo), May 7-10, 2020

IX International Gothic Literature Congress: "Internationalizing the Gothic"

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:10pm
International Gothic Literature Congress
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 31, 2020

IX International Gothic Literture Congress:

“Internationalizing the Gothic”

 

Objective: To continue the study of the plural presence of the Gothic in various modes of art, as well as time and space contexts. 

Dates: December 2, 3 & 4, 2020 (Wednesday, Thursday and Friday).

Place: School of Modern Languages, University of Costa Rica

 

Call for Papers: We are calling for papers centered upon the idea of the Gothic as a timeless and intertextual mode that surpasses the limits of genre and nation.

 

Trauma and Southeast Asian American Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 6:47pm
Association for Asian American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

The Southeast Asian American Section of the Association for Asian American Studies invites submissions for a panel:

 

Trauma and Southeast Asian American Studies

 

Association for Asian American Studies 40th Conference

April 9 – 11, 2020, Washington, DC

“Troubling Politics”

 

Agamben and Literature (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 3:44pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Giorgio Agamben is one of the most compelling contemporary theorists of literature. Yet despite ever intensifying interest in Agamben’s work, his studies of literature and poetics remain a less explored dimension of his corpus. This seminar seeks spirited contributions that engage with Agamben’s reflections on literary texts, as well as those mobilising the concepts and interests of his aesthetics into new readings. Papers addressing the connections between literature and other aspects of Agamben’s thought (such as sovereignty and biopolitics) are welcome, as are explorations of his writing’s intellectual and historical contexts – including its affinities with the work of thinkers such as Benjamin, Blanchot, Foucault, Derrida, de Man and Hamacher.

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