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Trans-spaces in 19th Century France

updated: 
Friday, September 22, 2017 - 10:20am
Ashley Byczkowski/ NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

19th-century France is known as a time of transgression, an upheaval of societal norms. But aside from the multiple political revolutions, this time period also gave way to figures that managed to exist between the binaries of society. Examples of transgression, transformation, and transgender can be found throughout the century, ranging from Romanticism’s “génie sans sexe”- George Sand- to J.K. Huysman’s decadent, androgynous, dandy- Des Esseintes. This proposed session invites papers that examine representations of these trans-spaces in and around the literature of the 19th century. Papers could consider biographical, literary, or historical moments of “trans”.

Are We Victorian?

updated: 
Friday, September 22, 2017 - 10:20am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

In 1875, Anthony Trollope published The Way We Live Now, a novel about financial crises, political corruption, debt, and xenophobia. These topics are familiar to us as well: The Way We Live Now is, in many ways, still the way we live now.

Much recent debate in Victorian studies has concerned “presentism”—the idea that we still live with in a Victorian world. Presentism says that there is not much new about “neoliberalism:” as the manifesto of the V21 collective puts it, “In finance, resource mining, globalization, imperialism, liberalism, and many other vectors, we are Victorian, inhabiting, advancing, and resisting the world they made."

Peaceful Modernisms

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 3:46pm
Prospective peer-reviewed cluster on the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

 

Prospective peer-reviewed cluster on the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform 

PEACEFUL MODERNISMS 

Editors: 

Charles Andrews and J. Ashley Foster 

Contact: charlesandrews@whitworth.edu and foster@csufresno.edu 

1971-2008: Culture Between Two Crises

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 3:45pm
NEMLA 2017 panel
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

The urgency to understand the transformations in the capitalist world system since the 1970s and describe its volatile processes of expansion has spawned a few creative attempts at periodization: Eric Hobsbawm’s “Landslide” (1994), Robert Brenner’s “The Long Downturn” (2006), Immanuel Wallerstein’s “Managed Decline” (2006), and Judith Stein’s “Age of Inequality” (2010) to name only a few. While economists and historians may disagree about the sources of crisis, from Harvey’s over-accumulation thesis to Brenner’s over-production and over-competition, there remains little doubt that the 1970s proved to be a “pivotal decade” and that we are now living with the consequences.

The Pastoral Hegemony: Innocence, Denial and Justice (ACLA, Los Angeles, 3/29-4/1/2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 3:42pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

This call is for a seminar to be held at the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) Convention, March 29-April 1, 2018 on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

The purpose is to re-think, re-tool and re-invigorate "versions of pastoral" as the medium of critique, and of the subsumption of the literal in particular. The supplementary purpose is to unearth a new series of pastoral figures, possibly beginning with that of a refugee.  

Culture at Our Borders

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 1:20pm
ACLA Annual Meeting (UCLA, LA, April 29-March 1, 2018)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

It has become increasingly difficult today to characterize cultural belonging. This is not to suggest that cultures have disappeared but that it has become impossible to think of them as homogeneous, providing us with totalizing expressions of collective identity. The globalizing movement of modernity, the deterritorializing flows of its economic relations and the migration that follows it show that the borders between cultures have dissolved while the concept of culture itself is more than ever characterized by internal tensions. It is then neither cultural identity nor its constitutive outside that is central to culture but rather the movement in which it already resides.

[ACLA 2018] The Aesthetics and Theory of Repair [updated]

updated: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 1:19pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The Aesthetics and Theory of Repair

ACLA Seminar @ UCLA, 3/28-4/1/2018

Organizer: Michael Dango (University of Chicago)

 

Narrative Dynamism (ACLA '18)

updated: 
Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 12:30pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 5, 2017

Unities, wholes, patterns, ends, beginnings, organization, structure: these terms all belong to the structuralist tool kit with which we are familiar, yet we believe that this vocabulary is in dire need of reassessment. While the structural impetuses of narratology continue, dynamic theories of narrative such as those proffered by Roland Barthes, Ross Chambers and others, have become less prominent.   In this seminar we will explore the following questions: What might a dynamic, systemic, and/or non-structuralist theory of narrative look like?  What narratives (in any medium) exemplify a dynamic notion of narrative? What additional insights might we gain by working through a dynamic as opposed to a structuralist approach to narrative and narratives?

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