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theory

Naval Wakes & Black Galactics: Being and Blackness in the Age of Slavery

updated: 
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 1:17pm
North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR 2019)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 28, 2018

For at least the last half-century, theories of Blackness have challenged the foundations of modern critical thought. Theorists such as Fred Moten, Jared Sexton, Christina Sharpe, Hortense Spillers, Alexander Weheliye, Frank Wilderson, Achille Mbembe, and Sylvia Wynter variously interrogate the politics, discourse, and materialities of the imperial, capitalist experience of slavery (and its afterlife). One important avenue of consideration is how this perverse institution undermined possibilities for the Enlightenment subject not simply for those of African descent but for all people complicit in the imperial project.

Close, Distant, Personal, Historical: The Elements of Reading Romanticism

updated: 
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 1:17pm
North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR 2019)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 4, 2019

Over the last decade, there has been an eruption of scholarly interest in the practices, methodologies, and techne of reading. Best and Marcus’s surface reading—which has influenced a broad sweep of New Formalist criticism—emerged alongside distant reading, one of the major interpretive paradigms of the digital humanities. The development of these twenty-first-century movements has been matched by renewed interest in twentieth-century formalisms, including the history of the New Criticism and the proto-neuroscientific approaches to reading taken by critics such as I.A. Richards.

Non-Binary: Retheorizing Romantic Sexes and Genders

updated: 
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 1:16pm
North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR 2019)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 30, 2018

This panel seeks to retheorize social constructivists accounts of Romantic sex and gender circulating since the early 80s that continue to persist and insist—however unwittingly—on a binaristic or universalistic normativity (hetero- or otherwise). Moreover, all such accounts are often firmly anthropocentric, offering little flexibility to engage the nonhuman in all of its material forms. More recent New Materialist accounts of sexes and genders provide resources for moving forward from the confines of the discursive prison of sex and gender that retains within it, again however unwittingly or unwillingly, a binarism between the social and the material, the human and the nonhuman.

Figuring Existence: A Postgraduate Conference in Existential Analysis

updated: 
Monday, November 5, 2018 - 10:37am
Centre for Theology and Modern European Thought, University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 1, 2018

FIGURING EXISTENCE

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

A Postgraduate Conference in Existential Analysis

 

Friday 1st March 2019

University of Oxford

United Kingdom

 

Keynote Speaker: Kate Kirkpatrick (King’s College London)

 

Organisers: Elizabeth Xiao-an Li and Nikolaas Deketelaere

Centre for Theology and Modern European Thought

 

Figuring Existence: A Postgraduate Conference in Existential Analysis

updated: 
Monday, November 5, 2018 - 10:12am
Centre for Theology and Modern European Thought, University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 1, 2018

FIGURING EXISTENCE

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

A Postgraduate Conference in Existential Analysis

 

Friday 1st March 2019

University of Oxford

United Kingdom

 

Keynote Speaker: Kate Kirkpatrick (King’s College London)

 

Organisers: Elizabeth Xiao-an Li and Nikolaas Deketelaere

Centre for Theology and Modern European Thought

 

Soapbox: Journal for Cultural Analysis​ 1.2 “Off the Grid”

updated: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 9:14am
Soapbox: Journal for Cultural Analysis
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 1, 2018

Grids govern our landscapes and cityscapes, our paintings and grocery lists, our maps and our borders, both walled and imaginary. They get us our energy and water, they fuel our online social lives, and structure the ways we perceive and move through space. On the one hand, the grid is a representational mode, one of rendering the world under a Euclidean regime of points, lines, and areas. On the other, it is the material infrastructure of utilities, transit routes and architecture. In an increasingly networked control society, data, numbers, and figures are in a constant feedback loop with material reality.

General Call for Papers - Spring 2019

updated: 
Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 8:55am
Dianoia: The Undergraduate Philosophy Journal of Boston College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 25, 2019

Dianoia, Boston College’s peer-reviewed Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy, is currently accepting submissions -- until January 25, 2019 -- for its Spring issue.

We’re looking for thoughtful and original papers on any topic pertaining to philosophy. The mission of our journal is to foster open, interdisciplinary philosophical discussion and writing among undergraduate students at institutions across the country.

Hortulus: Fall/Winter Issue CFP

updated: 
Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 11:07am
Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 15, 2018

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a refereed, peer-reviewed, and born-digital journal devoted to the culture, literature, history, and society of the medieval past. Published semi-annually, the journal collects exceptional examples of work by graduate students on a number of themes, disciplines, subjects, and periods of medieval studies. We also welcome book reviews of monographs published or re-released in the past five years that are of interest to medievalists. For the Fall/Winter 2018 issue we are particularly interested in papers and reviews of books which fall under the current special topic.

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