travel writing

RSS feed

MLA 2017 Special Session: Monster Studies: Literature, Culture, and Theory (Deadline 3/10/16)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 2:41pm
Chris Koenig-Woodyard / University of Toronto

This is a call for abstracts for a proposed special session on "Monster Studies" for the MLA in Philadelphia, 5-8 January, 2017. Abstracts are due on Friday, 11 March, 2016, and proposals for special MLA sessions are due on 1 April, 2016. Thus there are two rounds of acceptance: abstracts for a hoped-for panel, and the official acceptance of the panel for the 2017 MLA.

The proposed session will explore and expand the depth and breadth of the emerging field of "Monster Studies." Papers can explore monsters and the monstrous as the primary focus of scholarly inquiry in literary, humanities and cultural studies, and as a secondary focus--that is, as a pedagogical tool or method, for instance, in teaching composition and the humanities.

Utopian/Dystopian Narratives in French and Francophone Women's Writing -- SAMLA 88 (November 4-6, 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 1:20pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association/Women in French (Affiliated Group)

SAMLA 88 (November 4-6, 2016) at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront in Jacksonville, FL

Utopian/Dystopian Narratives in French and Francophone Women's Writing

This panel welcomes papers focused on the conference theme—"Utopia/Dystopia: Whose Paradise Is It?"—as explored in examples of French and francophone women's writing. Please send 250-word abstracts to Adrienne Angelo, Auburn University (ama0002@auburn.edu) by June 3, 2016.

Essay collection: Migration and Modernity 5/15/16

updated: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 11:36am
Juliet Shields

Call for Essays: Migration and Modernity: the state of being stateless, 1650-1850
We invite contributions for an essay collection on exile, migration, and statelessness in the "middle modern" period (~1650-1850), a time when the consolidation of the nation-state made more visible the movement--sometimes voluntary and sometimes forced--of peoples across and within political and geographical borders.

[REMINDER] Oxford English Graduate Conference on 'Progress', 3 June 2016 (deadline: 19 February 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 10:34am
Ágota Márton / University of Oxford

OXFORD ENGLISH GRADUATE CONFERENCE 3 JUNE 2016: PROGRESS

'When any real progress is made, we learn and unlearn anew what we thought we knew before.'
(Henry David Thoreau)

Throughout history the complex and contested idea of progress has held wide-ranging implications for literature and literary criticism. We see the meanings and consequences of progress translated across world literature, from The Pilgrim's Progress to the Futurist Manifesto; Renaissance Humanism to the Post-Human; from colonialism to postcolonial literature and theory.

[UPDATE] Archi-Textuality (Apri 16-17, 2016) - Hosted by CSUN English Department

updated: 
Monday, February 8, 2016 - 6:57pm
AGSE & Sigma Tau Delta Iota Chi

The CSUN Department of English Annual Conference
18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330
April 16-17, 2016
Sponsored by the Associated Graduate Students of English (AGSE) and Sigma Tau Delta Iota Chi Honors Society (STDIC)

"Archi-textuality: Interventions of Text & Textuality in Historical, Economical, Sociopolitical, and Psychological Space"

Norm and Anomaly in Literature, Culture, and Language 19-20 September 2016

updated: 
Monday, February 8, 2016 - 6:37pm
Franciszek Karpiński Institute for Regional Culture and Literary Research, Siedlce POLAND

Norm and anomaly have long constituted a binary opposition whose boundaries are becoming increasingly blurry and open to scrutiny. What precisely does the 'norm' mean? Which political, economic, and social forces play a decisive role in producing the 'norm'? How is the 'norm' endorsed through the construction of the 'anomaly'? And how does the 'anomaly' contest the 'norm'? Can the 'norm' be anomalous when viewed as a discursive practice and a form of ideological control? And can the 'anomaly' be an integral part of the 'norm' without losing its subversive and oppositional character?

Analyses/Rereadings/Theories Journal - call for articles - open issue

updated: 
Monday, February 8, 2016 - 3:40pm
Department of Studies in Drama and Pre-1800 English Literature, University of Lodz

Analyses/Rereadings/Theories (A/R/T Journal) is a peer-reviewed journal that has been created with a view to providing a forum for analyzing and discussing issues of immediate relevance for contemporary literary and cultural studies.

The editors would like to invite submission of contributions for its sixth issue, to be published in Summer 2016. We invite original articles, reviews and interviews addressing any topics related to Anglophone literature and culture.

The contributions should be between 4000 and 6000 words long. Each contribution will be anonymously refereed by a reviewer (double-blind review). The deadline for the submission of manuscripts is 31 March 2016.

Mobile Communities, October 14, 2016 (Abstract Deadline: May 15, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, February 8, 2016 - 1:15pm
Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference

Movement and stasis. Routes to and from home. Boundaries and belonging. Local places and global spaces. The possibilities for and barriers to mobility shape the way that communities, cultures, and individuals communicate with one another. Mobility influences interconnectivity across time and space as well as the formation of hierarchies of domination and subordination.

[update] John Steinbeck as an International Writer

updated: 
Sunday, February 7, 2016 - 10:28pm
Martha Heasley Cox Center for Steinbeck Studies, San Jose State University

Update: Proposal deadline extended to March 15, 2016.

Conference Description:
The International Society of Steinbeck Scholars invites conference papers that examine Steinbeck as an international/translational writer. Contributions are welcome from a wide variety of theoretical applications, such as Steinbeck's connections to world literature and world thought—for example, Classical Greek and Roman, Eastern, and twentieth-century Russian. How has Steinbeck adapted not only themes but also aesthetic choices and narrative strategies? Other topics are welcome as well: deep ecology, power and subjugation, the concept of democracy and America, ethics and philosophy, gender studies.

Keynotes by:

American Literature Before 1900- SCMLA November 3-5, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, February 7, 2016 - 8:36pm
South Central Modern Language Association

The South Central Modern Language Society's regular session for American Literature Before 1900 invites submissions for the 2016 annual conference to be held November 3-5 in Dallas, Texas. This year's conference theme is "The Spectacular City: Glamour, Decadence, and Celebrity in Literature and Culture." We welcome submissions on any topic relating to American Literature Before 1900, but we are particularly interested in papers that deal with the city and urbanity.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to Jamie Korsmo at jkorsmo1@gsu.edu

Deadline: March 31, 2016

SPECTRUM

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 9:03am
University of Dhaka

Spectrum, a refereed journal published by the Department of English, University of Dhaka, seeks submissions of scholarly articles, book reviews, translations and creative pieces for its forthcoming issue. Spectrum welcomes contributions by teachers, alumni and current students of English Literature, ELT and Linguistics. Essays on any literary period and any aspect of literature and language, book reviews, as well as short stories, poems and translations are sought. Submissions should not have been previously published, or be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Only articles/creative pieces recommended by reviewers will be accepted for publication.

Teaching Central/Eastern Europe And Its Communist Past

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 12:30am
Modern Language Association (MLA) Philadelphia, PA, January 2017

Central/Eastern Europe's cultural visibility has increased since the 1989 Fall of the Berlin Wall and then in 2009 when Romanian-born German writer Herta Müller received the Nobel Prize in Literature. In light of this new visibility, how are Central/Eastern European cultures and history being taught, both within and outside the region? What has changed in the ways these countries have contributed to the understanding of the cultural configuration of the region or the continent? What should educators include in various curricula? How do we teach the communist period to new generations and/or to the West and the rest of the world?

Comparative Medievalisms

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 4:07pm
Comparative Medieval Forum of the MLA (Philadelphia, January 2017)

What cultural work does the medieval past perform in global media and cultural productions—textual, visual, musical, performative, cinematic? Literary scholars and theorists have increasingly explored the varied forms that "medievalism" takes in contexts around the globe.

MLA Special Session Proposal: Episteme of Inequality: Studying Postcolonial Wealth Formation

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 3:37pm
MLA 2017 (in Philadelphia)

MLA Special Session:

Papers trace economic wealth, poverty, and reparation across particular colonial histories through literary texts, historical documentation, and other forms of cultural production. These are ethical readings touching the violence of capital across the _longue durée_ of modernity. Geographies under consideration include any part of the world impacted by European imperialism during the modern era. Organized by Aparajita De of UDC and Maureen Fadem of CUNY.

200-word abstract + Bio by 03/15/16 to: Aparajita De (de.aparajita@gmail.com) and Maureen Fadem (meruprecht@yahoo.com)

MOSF Journal of Science Fiction (Vol. 1, No. 2)

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 6:36am
Monica Louzon / Museum of Science Fiction

We are soliciting manuscripts to be featured in Vol. I, No. 2 of Museum of Science Fiction's Journal of Science Fiction (MOSF Journal of Science Fiction, http://publish.lib.umd.edu/scifi/index). The inaugural issue was released on January 26, 2016, and Vol. I, No. 2 will be published by May 31, 2016. Manuscripts for Vol. I, No. 2 are due by March 25, 2016.

[UPDATE] Green Britain: Nationhood and the Environment 1500-1750

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 5:49am
Birmingham Centre for Reformation and Early Modern Studies

During the early modern period, national identity was increasingly defined by the dynamic between people and the environment they populated. While many still longed for the pastoral ideal of Britain as the 'Eden of Europe', the looming threat of pollution, natural disaster, resource depletion, and urbanisation beset the thoughts of contemporary writers, theologians, and politicians. Though it had been long held that the environment had an observable influence on the fortunes of a nation and the character of its citizens, the inhabitants of early modern Britain now became gradually conscious of their impact on the natural world.

Vehicles for Thought: Goldsmiths Graduate Festival 2016, London, May 9-15

updated: 
Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 1:20pm
Goldsmiths, University of London

The Goldsmiths Graduate Festival is an important celebration of postgraduate research in Goldsmiths and in universities nationally and internationally. It is organised by and for postgraduate research students as a vital platform to present and share their work.

The Festival is scheduled to take place over one week, from 9th May until 15th May, and will consist of a broad range of activities including keynote speakers, performances, exhibitions, film screenings, papers, roundtables and panel discussions.

Teaching Central/Eastern Europe And Its Communist Past

updated: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2016 - 9:29pm
Modern Language Association (MLA) Philadelphia, PA, January 2017

Central & Eastern Europe's cultural visibility has increased since the 1989 Fall of the Berlin Wall and with Romanian-born German writer Herta Müller's 2009 Nobel Prize in Literature. In light of this new visibility, how are Central/Eastern European cultures and history being taught, both within and outside the region? What has changed in the way these countries (past and present) contribute to the understanding of the cultural configuration of the region or the continent? How and what should educators include in various curricula? How do we teach the communist period to new generations and/or to the West and the rest of the world?

The English Language Conference: "First Contact"

updated: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2016 - 5:40pm
California State University Dominguez Hills English Graduate Association

The English Language Conference seeks papers from scholars in all fields of English, including but not limited to Literature, Rhetoric and Composition, TESL, Creative Writing, and Education. This year's theme is "First Contact." We are looking for stories of first encounters with uncharted themes and outlying characters, texts, and authors.

[UPDATE] "Crafting Culture: Perspectives on Censorship"

updated: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2016 - 2:29pm
Caspersen School of Graduate Studies, Drew University

Crafting Culture: Perspectives on Censorship
Fourth Annual Dean Hopper New Scholars Conference
Drew University, June 10-12, 2016

Hosted by the graduate program in History and Culture at Drew, the 4th Annual Dean Hopper New Scholars Conference provides an opportunity for current graduate students and early career scholars to present their work in an academic setting.

[UPDATE] [Extended Deadline: February 15th] Aelurus Graduate Scholarly Literature Journal

updated: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 9:37pm
Aelurus Graduate Scholarly Literature Journal

Aelurus is an annual journal that publishes literary and theoretical scholarship from graduate students, which is run and staffed by graduate students in Weber State University's Master of Arts in English program. As such, Aelurus is devoted to a publication process in which we foster and lend experience to the scholarly endeavor of fellow graduate students.

Accepting:

Scholarly Articles (15-20 pages in length, but we will not turn away exceptional works that are outside of these margins)

Submission Guidelines:
Aelurus is currently accepting submissions for its 2016 issue. Submissions must be original works produced by graduate-level students at institutions within the United States.

[UPDATE] Roots and Routes: Exploring Movement, Mobility, and Belonging (20-21 May 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 7:49pm
Endnotes: UBC English Graduate Conference

Date: 20-21 May.

Location: UBC, Vancouver, Canada.

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO FEBRUARY 15, 2016!

Keynote Speakers: Caren Kaplan, University of California, Davis and Miranda Burgess, University of British Columbia.

.......................................................................
What does it mean to be from a place or a position? To move from one position to another? What does it mean to be "moved" by an aesthetic experience?

Space, Place, and Belonging

updated: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 2:47pm
Textual Overtures Graduate Journal

In the preface to Borderlands, Gloria Anzaldúa declares: "I am a border woman." As simple as it sounds, this statement suggests the individual's agency in the social and cultural production of personal identity as it boldly rejects to acknowledge the power of the state in the process.

The Modern Body 1830-Present, 3rd June 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 5:21am
University of York, Centre for Modern Studies

When Henry David Thoreau writes that: 'We are all sculptors and painters, and our material is our own flesh and blood and bones', he attests how the body and expression are intrinsically linked. Bodies become not only a central subject, but a way in which we see and talk about other things. Bodies are not only created, but perform, communicate and create.

Movements & Migrancies (April 27-28, 2016) [UPDATE] [EXTENDED DEADLINE]

updated: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 4:43am
University of Toronto, Department of English, Graduate English Association

[There] are lines of articulation or segmentarity, strata and territories; but also lines of flight, movements of deterritorialization and destratification.
—Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus

standing on the map of my political desires
I toast to a borderless future

—Guillermo Gómez-Peña, "Freefalling Toward a Borderless Future"

Movements & Migrancies (April 27-28, 2016) [UPDATE] [EXTENDED DEADLINE]

updated: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 4:36am
University of Toronto, Department of English, Graduate English Association

[There] are lines of articulation or segmentarity, strata and territories; but also lines of flight, movements of deterritorialization and destratification.
—Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus

standing on the map of my political desires
I toast to a borderless future

—Guillermo Gómez-Peña, "Freefalling Toward a Borderless Future"

Pages