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twentieth century and beyond

Global Conference on Women and Gender CFP

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:24pm
Christopher Newport University's Global Conference on Women and Gender
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Christopher Newport University’s College of Arts and Humanities

seeks abstracts for the forthcoming 

 

Global Conference on Women and Gender

to be held at CNU, March 19-21, 2020

 

We are pleased to announce that the theme for this year’s conference is: 

Gender, Politics, and Everyday Life: Power, Resistance and Representation

Help Thou My (Un)Belief: Reading Belief in 20th- and 21st-century American Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:24pm
Sara Judy
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Call for Papers, for a panel at the next NeMLA conference, in Boston, March 5-8, 2020.

NeMLA’s theme this year will be: "Shaping and Sharing Identities: Spaces, Places, Languages, and Cultures"

Help Thou My (Un)Belief: Reading Belief in 20th- and 21st-century American Literature

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference Extended Deadline CFP, Samuel Beckett and the Comedy of Unhappiness

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:16pm
Fergal O'Doherty, Palomar College
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS (Extended Deadline!)

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference

Thursday, November 14, 2019 to Sunday, November 17, 2019, Wyndham San Diego Bayside Hotel, San Diego, California

Conference Theme "Send in the Clowns"

Technoaesthetics: Ways of Seeing the 21st Century (NEMLA 2020)

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:18am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In a letter written to Jacques Derrida in 1982, Gilbert Simondon poses a question to the project of deconstruction: “Why not think about founding and perhaps even provisionally axiomatizing an aesthetico-technics or techno-aesthetics?” Aesthetic thought has for too long remained at the level of subjective contemplation, which effaces any substantive understanding of technology’s effects upon the larger cultural sphere. The technical and the aesthetic, Simondon contends, should instead be understood as a “continuous spectrum” of experience, as each are composed of a “set of sensations” that emerge as matter is transformed, whether by the artist, the engineer, the designer, or the machinist.

English in a World of Strangers: Rethinking World Anglophone Studies

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:20am
Goethe Universitity of Frankfurt
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Call for Papers

English in a World of Strangers:

Rethinking World Anglophone Studies

 

31st Annual Conference of the Association for Anglophone Postcolonial Studies (Gesellschaft für Anglophone Postkoloniale Studien / GAPS)

Goethe University Frankfurt, 21-24 May, 2020

 

Reading Politics and Art in the Poetry of Tracy K. Smith (NEMLA 2020 Panel)

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:12am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

CFP for the 51st Annual NEMLA Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, March 5 - 8, 2019

Tracy K. Smith, with four books of poetry, a volume of memoirs, a Pulitzer Prize and two stints as America's poet laureate, has every claim to be a major American poet at the pinnacle of success. It is easy to dwell on the mainstream acceptance that this success has earned. Her work is often described in highly aesthetic language, with an emphasis on its beauty and craft, and she sits neatly in the American poetic tradition. Among those poets she considers “most necessary” she invokes Seamus Heaney, Elizabeth Bishop, and Philip Larkin (Ordinary Light 336). 

To Shape and Share Otherwise: Neoliberalism and the Contemporary Novel

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:46am
Steven Delmagori, University at Albany, SUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

"The only reason for the existence of a novel is that it does compete with life."

                                                                        --Henry James in "The Art of Fiction"

                                                                       

Writing Bios: Biopolitics in 20th-century Literature and Beyond (Roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 3:53pm
NeMLA 2020 (Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the biopolitical turn, scholars across disciplines have attempted to make sense of the encounter between life (bios) and politics. This attention paid to the topic of biopolitics shows a cultural ethos that revolves around an awareness of power connected to the body. This roundtable invites papers that analyze how literature engages with biopolitics, particularly in the conceptualizations and depictions of the body in relation to power in 20th- and 21st-century literature. Roundtable participants are encouraged to submit abstracts that engage with the following questions: “How is life (and the body) culturally inscribed with meaning and definition,” and further, “What is a consequence of that inscription?”

Not-So-Dead Women: Renegotiating Femininity and Death in Literature and Pop Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 3:53pm
NeMLA 2020 (Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Women’s corpses, such as those of Snow White or Ophelia, are often depicted as a beautiful and passive objects, which has led scholars to posit cultural reflections concerning tacit assumptions in the link between femininity and death. In relation to modern literature and art, scholars such as Elizabeth Bronfen (Over Her Dead Body), Elizabeth Grosz (Volatile Bodies), Sarah Goodwin (Death and Representation) argue that dead women are an nexus of morbidity, alterity, and beauty that unconsciously encapsulates the anxiety of the inexpressible event of death, and, as such, dead women are given the value of the “other” in the most macabre fashion.

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