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twentieth century and beyond

ACLA Panel: Networks of Adoption

updated: 
Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:42pm
Melissa Dinsman and Beth Rosenberg
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

This call seeks abstracts for the upcoming ACLA conference for papers that will focus on representations of adoption in literature. The goal of this panel is to explore how literary representations of adoption and the formation of adoptive families have changed over time. To do this, we are looking for a broad range of papers that address adoption in literature from different national, religious, racial, gender, and theoretical perspectives. We are also open to definitions of adoption that include varying degrees of legalization.

NEMLA '18 World-Making and Anglophone Fiction

updated: 
Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:42pm
Shun Y. Kiang / Case Western Reserve University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

In his recent work On Literary Worlds (2012), Eric Hayot examines how literature—through narration—gives shape and substance to worlds and ways of being in them. Literary worlds, Hayot argues,“[are] the diegetic totality constituted by the sum of all aspects of a single work, constellated into a structure or system that amounts to a whole” (44) and “they are always social and conceptual constructs, as well as formal and affective ones” (45).

Film / Film Studies (CEA 4/5-4/7/2018)

updated: 
Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:42pm
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Subject: Call for Papers: Film Studies at CEA 2018

 

Call for Papers, Film Studies at CEA 2018

April 5-7, 2018 | St. Petersburg, Florida

Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront

333 1st St South, Saint Petersburg, Florida  33701 | Phone: (727) 894-5000

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on Film Studies for our 49th annual conference. Submit your proposal at http://www.cea-web.org

"Just Read"?: Reviving Form in a Postcritical Terrain

updated: 
Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 11:42pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 49th Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, PA April 12-15, 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

"Just Read"?: Reviving Form in a Postcritical Terrain 

The postcritical turn has called for an alternative to critique in favor of description, surface reading, and the literal. In response, this panel investigates recent theorizations of form that rethink critique without leaving theory behind. Taking interpretation as indivisible from description, how might we consider form as a means by which texts theorize themselves? How can form explore questions of identity, environment, or politics? How can a return to form rethink the literary and the critical together?

DEADLINE EXTENDED, CFP: Postcolonial Economies: Genealogies of Capital and the Colonial Encounter (edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 8:44am
Maureen Fadem (CUNY) and Michael O'Sullivan (Chinese U HK)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Regarding an ongoing research project at Columbia University, Barnard student Sabrina Singer reflected that when she walks around the campus, now, she wonders: “What else is history going to forget?”[1] The research Singer and her colleagues are doing looks at the historical ties between the institution now educating them and the historical institution of slavery. We were prompted to similar reflections having visited Yale’s Peabody Museum and an exhibit there of Elihu Yale’s gemstones collection. Included in the display is a painting of Yale: he is pictured with a large unfinished diamond ring symbolizing Britain’s dominance over India.

The Subject of Women in Proust (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:18pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 49th Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, PA April 12-15, 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 25, 2017

The Subject of Women in Proust

 

On first reading, Proust's narrative in A la Recherche du temps perdu suggests that women are merely objects in Marcel's development. Despite extensive descriptions and metaphors, female characters seem to slip away from concrete definition, defying assured characterization. Moreover, most critical discussions of women in Proust compartmentalize female characters either as “Madonnas” (Marcel’s mother and grandmother) or “whores” (Odette, Gilberte, Albertine, Léa, Rachel). But how are women in Proust's fiction more than just objects? Given their centrality to the text, a reexamination of the ways in which Proust writes female characters is overdue.

EXILE SURVIVAL DISSENT

updated: 
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:25pm
The International Lawrence Durrell Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 8, 2018

 On Miracle Ground XX

          The International Lawrence Durrell Society invites proposals for papers to be presented at a July 2018 conference in downtown Chicago. In a year marking the centenary of Solzhenitsyn’s birth and the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Durrell’s satirical dystopia Tunc, ILDS welcomes papers reflecting on modernist and postmodern writers or artists who challenged the political and cultural ideologies of their time and place. Interrogating conceptions of exile, survival, and dissent, we will explore how the work of these past intellectual dissidents has shaped our critiques of twenty-first century society.

Women, Madness, and Badness in Contemporary American Literature and Visual Arts

updated: 
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:25pm
Northeast Modern Language Association Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Where does one draw the line between madness and badness when it comes to women’s misbehavior? In some cases, a woman who defies social convention is considered bad, exhibiting a kind of failed femininity. In others, her actions are, in fact, so bad that she must be mad to have committed them. This panel seeks to unpack the concepts of madness and badness in contemporary American literature and visual arts to determine when these terms are worth resisting, and when they might be worth embracing.

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