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CFP Winter 2020 - General Submissions

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 12:20pm
Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS – Winter 2020

Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS), an open access academic e-journal, invites original and unpublished research papers and book reviews from various interrelated disciplines including, but not limited to, literature, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, history, sociology, law, ecology, environmental science, and economics.

TOTAL SCREEN: Why Jean Baudrillard, Once Again?

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:56am
MAST Journal (Media Art
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

CFP: Special Issue: MAST Journal
TOTAL SCREEN: Why Jean Baudrillard, Once Again? 

Guest editors:
Katharina Niemeyer (University of Québec in Montréal)
Magali Uhl (University of Québec in Montréal)

Extended deadline for full submissions: 15th November 2020 (for publication in May 2021).

Established and Contemporary Caribbean Voices (Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Caribbean novelists, poets, and playwrights have contributed inestimable riches to the world of literature. How have the themes and styles of established Caribbean voices, including Brathwaite, Walcott, Cliff, and Naipaul, been adapted or diverged from by younger Caribbean voices? Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words and be submitted via the Northeast Modern Language Association website. Go to http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/callforpapers/submit.html

Distinctions between Rabindranath Tagore's Shorter and Longer Fiction (Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Bengali author Rabindranath Tagore, the first non-Westerner to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, was a prolific writer in diverse literary genres, including both long and short-form fiction. This panel explores similarities and differences between Tagore’s short stories on the one hand, and his novellas and novels, on the other. Did the Bengali author tend to treat specific themes at length while reserving other motifs for his shorter fiction? Concerning setting, characterization, and plot trajectory, what are similarities and differences between Tagore’s shorter tales and his novels? Are there differences between Tagore’s stories and his novels regarding their accessibility and currency in the present day and for transnational audiences?

19th-century British Novels and the Shape of British Writing Today (Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

To what extent have 19th-century British novelists, such as Austen, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy, influenced the works of contemporary British writers? Is there a continuity of themes and styles, or have 21st-century British authors fundamentally broken away from examples of the past? Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words and be submitted via the Northeast Modern Language Association website. Go to http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/callforpapers/submit.html

Endless Beginner: Adrienne Rich in the Twenty-First Century

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:49am
Cynthia R. Wallace / Arizona Quarterly
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Re-reading Adrienne Rich in the quickly shifting crises of the year 2020, one senses the renewed urgency of her ethico-political project as a citizen poet seeking to “believe the fever can break, the sick body politic come back to life” (A Human Eye 98). Throughout her poetic career Rich challenged the perceived disconnect between poetry and material social good, and while her early and mid-career poems may be the most frequently anthologized, the poetry and prose she published in the second half of her six-decade project continues an extraordinary trajectory of expanding solidarities and poetic technique.

Music and Nationalism: 3rd Global Interdisciplinary Conference

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 2:35am
Progressive Connexions
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 25, 2020

Music and Nationalism
3rd Global Interdisciplinary Conference

Friday 16th April 2021 - Saturday 17th April 2021
Vienna, Austria

Music is commonly regarded as a universal language, and yet it is also through music that the fiercest of nationalistic sentiments and inspirations for protest and rebellion have been expressed.

Thinking with Plants

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 9:46pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

From arborescence to the rhizome, plants have long served as models for thinking in philosophy, biology, and the arts. In recent years, scholars including Michael Marder, Catriona Sandilands, and Jeffrey Nealon have brought renewed attention to the agency and dynamism of the vegetal, at the same time that the future of plant life has come to be at risk in the wake of climate change and the impending collapse of ecosystems. This panel invites papers that explore ways of thinking about and with plants in the shadow of the Anthropocene. How do writers and visual artists, past and present, help us renegotiate our relationship to the vegetal today?

The Detective, the Artist, and the Professor: Genre and Other Critical Mysteries

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 12:31pm
Mollie Copley Eisenberg / University of Southern California
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This is a call for papers for a panel to run at NeMLA 2021, which will be conducted virtually March 11-14, 2021. Submit an abstract by September 30, 2020 here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18807

This panel seeks to convene a conversation that theorizes the relationship between the detective novel, the art novel as it has been understood since modernism, and professional literary study—and in doing so move the critical study of detective fiction beyond the impulse to validate the genre as an object of study or redeem it from the stigma of genre.

Call for Papers: »Non-Narrative Comics«

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 11:43am
CLOSURE: The Kiel University e-Journal for Comics Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 22, 2020

Call for Papers – CLOSURE: The Kiel University e-Journal for Comics Studies #8 (November 2021) / Thematic Section: »Non-Narrative Comics«

Open Section

In the fall of 2021, CLOSURE will once again offer a forum for all facets of comics studies. From literary, cultural, media, social and image research to the sciences and beyond: the seventh edition of CLOSURE continues our ongoing search for the best and most innovative articles and reviews representing the state of the art in comics research. We welcome detailed close readings as much as comics theory and pioneering approaches to the medium — our open section comprises a diverse range of interdisciplinary studies of all things ›comic‹.

Meaningful Machines: Exploring Creative Programming for Creative Writing and Literature (Roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 11:42am
Lillian-Yvonne Bertram, UMass Boston
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While the expressive potential for programming and writing is closely associated with corporate use (such as customer-facing chatbots, aggregate sentiment analysis of product reviews, and text generators), there are authors who build and use these tools to reveal something about, and generate, literature. Out of this emerges a poetics of programming that can serve to reconceptualize how we think of and consider the place of programming in a creative writing classroom. The rich history of digital poetics is being rapidly advanced by authors like Allison Parrish, Nick Montfort, Milton Laufer, Rafael Perez y Perez, Stephanie Strickland, and more.

(Updated) Still Greek to Us: Greek Myth and 21st-century Literature (NeMLA 2021)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 5:54pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Stories from ancient Greek myths dot the literary landscape of the early 21st century. To some extent, this has been the result of deliberate planning, as when Canongate began publishing a series of mythological retellings by well-known authors in 2005. But alongside and independent of such coordinated efforts to keep old tales alive for contemporary audiences, offerings from both established authors (David Malouf, Barry Unsworth, Colm Toibin, Pat Barker) and successful newcomers (Madeline Miller, Daisy Johnson) have likewise retold and reimagined mythical narratives in recent years.

"Essential Workers": Precarious Labor in the Literary Imagination

updated: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 3:41pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

52nd Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

March 11-14, 2021 / Philadelphia, PA

In light of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic and public debate about who or what kind of work is deemed “essential,” this panel seeks to examine the intersection of literature and labor, prioritizing depictions of precarious workers who are sacrificing their personal well-being for the public good, but also to maintain their own economic security.

SAMLA 2020 EXTENDED - American Literature and the Market

updated: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 9:56am
Ian Afflerbach / South Atlantic Modern Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

SAMLA - EXTENDED DUE TO PANELIST BACKING OUT 

(Digital - November 13-15, 2020; previously Jacksonville FL)

 

[DEADLINE EXTENDED] Giant Steps: Coltrane, Space, and Innovation

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:55pm
Michael A. Antonucci | Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Giant Steps: Coltrane, Space, and Innovation

The Savoy Ballroom in New York, Preservation Hall in New Orleans, the intersection of 12th Street and Vine in Kansas City, and the Green Mill on Chicago’s North Side all stand as cradles for jazz tradition.

How does one site those spaces though that have housed jazz innovations, like 1511 North 33rd in Philadelphia, John Coltrane’s Strawberry Mansion?Where are the places that jazz can call home? Improvisations and experimentation certainly, but what spaces and which places make those transitions in the artform, its delivery, and reception?

Subverting Traditions in the Maghreb Through Literature and the Cinema

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:06pm
Yasmina Nagnoug Mejai / University of London Institute in Paris
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

NeMLA 2021 CONVENTION (11-14 March)

Call for Papers for a panel on the Maghreb: ''Subverting Traditions in the Maghreb through Literature and the Cinema''

Panel description:

Reading in Theory (ACLA 2021--Virtual)

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:05pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Despite the proliferation of critical engagements with theories of reading by scholars of literary studies, it seems fair to say that relatively little has changed since Paul de Man claimed, “the resistance to theory is in fact a resistance to reading, a resistance that is perhaps at its most effective, in contemporary studies, in the methodologies that call themselves theories of reading but nevertheless avoid the function they claim as their object” (The Resistance to Theory 15). This panel asks, is this resistance brought to a theory of reading, as if from “the outside,” or is resistance internal to any theory of reading? In what ways does reading generate and/or depend on its own resistances?

 

Chapter on Molly Keane (M.J. Farrell) and the Gothic for edited collection "Middlebrow Gothic: Dark Domesticity in British Popular Fiction, 1920-1960"

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:05pm
Christopher Yiannitsaros
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 10, 2020

A chapter which explores the fiction of middlebrow author Molly Keane (alias: M.J. Farrell) in realtion to the Gothic is sought to round off the edited collection Middlebrow Gothic: Dark Domesticity in British Popular Fiction, 1920-1960.

 

The original CfP is as follows:

 

Edited book on “Theatre-Fiction”

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:04pm
Dr. Graham Wolfe / National University of Singapore
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 1, 2020

Seeking proposals for an edited book of chapters on “theatre-fiction”, i.e. novels and stories about theatre.

 

ART, AESTHETICS, AND CULTURE IN INDIAN FOLKLORE

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:04pm
GD Goenka University, Gurugram
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 30, 2020


  1. Understanding Indian Folklore

  2. Globalization and Folklore Literature

  3. Folk Art of India

  4. Folklore Theories 

  5. Folklore Aesthetics and Folk Poetics

  6. Indian Folklore: Forms and Patterns

  7. Indian Folklore and Performing Arts

  8. Ideology, Propaganda, and Folklore

  9. Identity, Culture, and  Folklore

  10. Folklore and  Oral Tradition

Egan, After Postmodernism (NeMLA 2021 panel)

updated: 
Saturday, September 12, 2020 - 10:23pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This panel will consider Jennifer Egan’s work in light of the post-90s literary and cultural movements emerging after postmodernism. While these contemporary trends have different names and aims (post-postmodernism, metamodernism, new sincerity, post-irony, digimodernism, performatism, the neoliberal novel, and many more), they all attempt to critique and move beyond postmodernism in some concentrated way. We invite papers that locate and complicate Egan’s work in relation to these contemporary movements.

ennifer Egan will be the convention's keynote speaker this year.

Ways of Reading: The Politics of Method (NeMLA 2021 roundtable)

updated: 
Saturday, September 12, 2020 - 10:22pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The problem of method in literary scholarship continues, with the contemporary wave of “ways of reading” reanimating it through proposals of postcritique, surface reading, reparative reading, descriptive reading, distant reading, denotative reading, and so on. Many of these new approaches do their own critical work of locating and addressing the ideological implications of more traditional scholarly practices (as when Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick posits reparative reading against a tradition of paranoid reading, or when Stephen Best and Sharon Marcus advocate for surface reading against symptomatic reading). At the same time, many of these new approaches to methodology have also been brought to task for not being politically self-reflective enough.

Call for chapters for an edited book: Imagining the 1980s: Representations of the Reagan Decade in Popular Culture

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:46pm
McFarland Publishers
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Popular culture scholars often refer to a 40-year cycle of nostalgia, and so it is not surprising that there has been a recent wave of movies and television shows set in the 1980s.  The Netflix series Stranger Things, the film IT: Chapter One, the interactive film Black Mirror: Bandersnatch, and the ninth season of American Horror Story, titled “1984,” all provide prominent examples of recent texts that have used the semantic texture of the 1980s as a dramatic setting.  The fact that these texts all use the ’80s as a context for horror stories suggests the sense that an undercurrent of demonic violence undergirds the glittering fads, suburban affluence, and Reaganite yuppieism associated with the 1980s, even as these te

The Repoliticization of Urban Spaces in 80s and 90s Europe

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:43pm
Dario Marcucci Luca Zamparini
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In the late 70s, the protraction of the Cold War’s tensions and the shift from Fordism towards neoliberal economics reshaped the political and public sphere within the Western block. The traditional spaces of politics lost their pivotal role, resulting in what was perceived as a general crisis of militant politics. In a 2011 interview with Justice spatiale | Spatial Justice, rereading Henri Lefebvre, David Harvey posited that this perception stemmed from the inability of the Left to include the urban dimension in its analytical framework.

CFP for Peer-reviewed international Journal submission

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:42pm
Sorbonne Université / Sillages critiques
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Sillages critiques is an international, peer-reviewed open-access e-journal devoted to the literatures and the arts of anglophone cultures from the sixteenth century to the present day. It is MLA- and DOAJ-listed and publishes articles both in English and French. Attached to the Sorbonne Department of English Studies and its Literature and Culture Research Centre (VALE, Sorbonne Université), Sillages critiques publishes cutting-edge articles on literature, culture and theory.

We welcome individual submissions as well as proposals for thematic issues presented by guest editors.

https://journals.openedition.org/sillagescritiques/

Thieving the Past: Integrating History into Creative Work

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:41pm
Northeast MLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This creative session will explore the craft of creating historically informed works of fiction, poetry, digital arts, and other media. Creative writers regularly draw from the past to deepen context, to expand possibilities for material and subject matter, and to potentially illuminate connections between past and present. However, the technical process of integrating historical elements creates many challenges. This session will ask creative writers to share methods they’ve developed to make the past resonate, to energize and pattern historical detail, to maintain an authentic voice, and to make contemporary readers emotionally invest in their material.

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