category: twentieth century and beyond

[UPDATE] 2016 NeMLA Panel (Submit by September 30, 2015): On the Limits of Computational Analysis

full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 
Jonathan.Dickstein@alumni.cgu.edu

The following will be a panel at next year's NeMLA Conference, set to take place between March 17 and March 20 in Hartford, Connecticut.

Edited collection on college movies, Nov. 1, 2015

full name / name of organization: 
Randy Laist and Kip Kline
contact email: 
rlaist@goodwin.edu and klinech@lewisu.edu

Movies about college have been a staple of American cinema since the silent era.

The Marvel Cinematic Universe as Literature (NeMLA 2016 Roundtable 15845)

full name / name of organization: 
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos, Independent Scholar / Derek S. McGrath, SUNY Stony Brook
contact email: 
maryiatrop@gmail.com / derek.s.mcgrath@gmail.com

With dynamic individual superhero/superhuman characters populating a world of complex, interwoven mythologies and origin stories, the films and television series of Marvel Comics Studios present an ex

The Monster In The House: Domestic Ideology in Superhero Narratives (NeMLA 2016 Panel 15842)

full name / name of organization: 
Mary Ellen Iatropoulos, Independent Scholar / Derek S. McGrath, SUNY Stony Brook
contact email: 
maryiatrop@gmail.com / derek.s.mcgrath@gmail.com

Deadline for abstract submissions: September 30th 2015

Rethinking National Foundations: Using/Abusing History (ACLA 2016; March 17-20; Cambridge, MA)

full name / name of organization: 
Meredith Malburne-Wade (Gettysburg College) / ACLA 2016
contact email: 
mmalburn@gettysburg.edu

Foundational texts, events, and people influence our cultural and national personas.

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

full name / name of organization: 
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north
contact email: 
smatheson

The quint’s twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and r

Adolescence in Film and Television (March 21-25, 2016; Proposals due October 1, 2015)

full name / name of organization: 
Popular Culture/American Culture Association
contact email: 
k.hart@tcu.edu

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture/American Culture Association Conference, to be held March 21-25, 2016 in Seattle, Was

[UPDATE] Roundtable: "Crushed Silos: The Video Essay, Film, Writing, and Technology." NeMLA Hartford, CT

full name / name of organization: 
Rebecca Romanow/University of Rhode Island
contact email: 
rromanow@uri.edu

Call for Papers

46th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 17-20, 2016
Hartford, CT

[UPDATE] Phoneography: Low-tech, Mobile, Mutant, and Guerilla Film Theory NeMLA

full name / name of organization: 
Rebecca Romanow/University of Rhode Island
contact email: 
rromanow@uri.edu

Call for Papers

46th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 17-20, 2016
Hartford, CT
iPhoneography: Low-tech, Mobile, Mutant, and Guerilla Film Theory

Modern Myth and Legend - Louisville Conference (Feb. 18-20, 2016)

full name / name of organization: 
International Lawrence Durrell Society
contact email: 
clawsonj@gram.edu

The Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900


http://www.thelouisvilleconference.com


Louisville, KY | 18-20 February 2016

"we do create the world around us since we get it to reflect back our inner symbolism at us. Every man carries a little myth-making machine inside him which operates often without him knowing it. Thus you might say that we live by a very exacting kind of poetic logic--since we get exactly what we ask for, no more and no less."
--The Dark Labyrinth (1947)

Dealing overtly with ideas of myth and legend, Lawrence Durrell's The Dark Labyrinth chronicles the adventures of British tourists exploring a cave system on Crete just after World War II. Despite their awareness of how reality is transformed by their individual experiences, beliefs, and myth-making, they are no less susceptible to the fear of the minotaur which might be chasing them through the dark passageways. A myth becomes the way we understand the world. As a legend, the monster and its labyrinth offer grounds to reflect on personal terrors and emerge triumphant—or be consumed.

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