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#Dickens150

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2020 - 2:08pm
Virtual Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, May 10, 2020

9 June 2020 will mark the 150th anniversary of the death of globally beloved author Charles Dickens (1812-1870). Unfortunately, many planned celebrations have been cancelled or postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. To encourage support of research and writing as our world copes with this crisis, and to bring us together for an important anniversary in this time of social distancing, #Dickens150, a virtual transatlantic global gathering, will take place on this date. All proceeds, after covering a minor technology fee, will be donated to the Charles Dickens Museum, London.

Gothic Panel at SCMLA 2020

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
South Central Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 27, 2020

DatesOctober 8-10 2020

Place: Houston, TX

 

Gender and the Supernatural in the Victorian Short Story

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2020 - 11:59pm
Dr Oindrila Ghosh, Associate Professor, Diamond Harbour Women's University, West Bengal, India
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, April 25, 2020

The Victorian period is generally thought of as an age where science and its discoveries led to a shift from the religious to a scientific explanation of the natural world. Obviously at the centre of this whole shift was Charles Darwin, his powerful inferences and the delayed publication of The Origin of Species, as he feared disturbing established religious and social practices. And the crises of faith it did instill affected an entire generation. However much we wish to adhere to this scientific aspect of the Victorian period, one cannot ignore the fact that the age also saw a proliferation of the interest and belief in the supernatural, the occult, in ghost stories, séances et al.

Trust in the Text

updated: 
Thursday, April 16, 2020 - 1:40pm
Joseph Sterrett, Aarhus University, Denmark
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

The introduction of movable type print in late fifteenth-century Europe began with the noble aspiration of making the Word of God available for all, most famously exemplified by the Gutenberg Bible.  How could early printers have foreseen that their work would prepare the ground for the violence and social turmoil that would follow in the Reformation. Texts, broadly defined, were experiencing a powerful transformation. The trust that people placed in texts came under severe strain even as they were more readily available than ever before.  Texts of all kinds—the sermon of the local clergyman, a pamphlet expressing a political view, poetry, plays, even the Word of God itself—required new methods and systems for declaring their trustworthiness.

RMMLA English Nineteenth-Century Literature - Deadline Extended

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2020 - 2:47pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 30, 2020

Rocky Mountain
Modern Language Association
Seventy-fourth annual convention

October 8-10, 2020

Boulder, Colorado | Millennium Harvest House Hotel

English Nineteenth-Century Panel
Deadline Extended: April 30

Call for Proposals/Submissions: Reexamining Arthur Conan Doyle

updated: 
Tuesday, June 2, 2020 - 1:28pm
Nils Clausson
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 15, 2020

Cambridge Scholars Publishing announces a Call for Proposals/Submissions for a collection of essays provisionally entitled Re-examining Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Nils Clausson, author of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Art of Fiction: A Revaluation (Cambridge Scholars Publishing 2018; paperback 2019). The focus of the collection will be on re-examining all aspects of Arthur Conan Doyle’s life and writings. Proposals should make clear how the chapter will specifically contribute to the project of re-examination.

Asking and Answering the Sublime Question: Visions, Views, Vitalities

updated: 
Monday, March 30, 2020 - 2:46pm
Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

Special Issue

Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics  

Asking and Answering the Sublime Question: Visions, Views, Vitalities

Hunger and Survival in Dickens

updated: 
Monday, March 23, 2020 - 10:09am
MLA 2021/ Dickens Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 30, 2020

MLA 2021 (Toronto, 7-10 January)Dickens Society Allied Organization Panel This panel invites papers considering hunger and/or survival or persistence in Dickens's world. What are Dickens’s characters hungering after? What do we make of feast or famine in Dickens?  Please submit 300-word proposals and a brief bio to Sara Malton (sara.malton@smu.ca)

Deadline for submissions: Monday, 30 March 2020

 

 

 

DEADLINE EXTENDED Economy and Value of Time in Boredom

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 12:54pm
MLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2020

The word boredom has been in circulation since Ancient times, in the shape of a variety of synonyms --acedia, taedium vitae, horror loci, melancholy, ennui, spleen-- and bearing a theological stamp, since it was believed to be a demonic sin in the Christian tradition. In modernity, however, for the “enlightened subject” (Goodstein, 4), as a response to social and economic transformations, boredom has become a secular experience concerned with temporality, signifying loss of meaning and feeling of emptiness in the pace of modern life. In critical circles, boredom remains a hybrid phenomenon that brings together a variety of contradictory definitions.

RMMLA English Nineteenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Friday, March 6, 2020 - 1:19pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Rocky Mountain
Modern Language Association
Seventy-fourth annual convention

October 8-10, 2020

Boulder, Colorado | Millennium Harvest House Hotel

English Nineteenth-Century Panel

The 2020 Convention of the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association welcomes abstracts related to English Nineteenth-Century Literature. Ranging from the Regency to the Victorian era, the Nineteenth Century was an eclectic time facing significant social, political, and economic changes. Considering this period of change (and perhaps even how our own time is one of change) we invite abstracts dealing with, but not limited to topics such as:

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