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25th Annual Dickens Society Symposium, 17-19 July 2020

updated: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 1:53pm
The Dickens Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

OUR DICKENS: DICKENS AND HIS PUBLICS

17th-19th July 2020, Bloomsbury, London

In 2020, the 150-year anniversary of Dickens’s death, the annual Dickens Society Symposium will take place in Bloomsbury, Dickens’s home for periods of time and where he produced some of his most memorable novels. Organised by Royal Holloway, University of London, in collaboration with the Charles Dickens Museum (formerly the Dickens House Museum), the anniversary Symposium seeks to explore what Dickens means to so many people across the world and why he has meant so much to diverse publics over time.

EXTENDED DEADLINE Edith Wharton's New York

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 9:15am
Edith Wharton Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Edith Wharton’s New York:

A Conference Sponsored by the Edith Wharton Society

New Yorker Hotel

June 17th-20th 2020 

EXTENDED DEADLINE: Please submit proposals no later than September 15th, 2019 to whartonnewyork@gmail.com

Nineteenth-Century Formations

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 12:18pm
University of Hong Kong
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Nineteenth-Century Formations

The University of Hong Kong

December 6-7

 

This interdisciplinary conference asks participants to rethink the nineteenth century and its social, aesthetic, and discursive formations. It brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to consider the categories that inform and shape our various disciplinary approaches to the nineteenth century. In doing so, it invokes the term “formations” in a broad sense, to convey the processes by which concepts, categories, structures, systems, and institutions—many of which remain in place today—came into existence during this period.

 

(NeMLA 2020) George Eliot's Unfortunate Men

updated: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 5:50pm
51st Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Things often end badly for males in George Eliot’s fiction. Macarthy, the antisocial artist in her first published prose fiction, dies unappreciated; dreamy Seth Bede reconciles himself to a pitiful bachelordom; Smilesian Tom Tulliver charters his wealth (but not his wellbeing); opportunistic Harold Transome is chastened by his circumstances; pedantic Edward Casaubon fails as a scholar and as a gentleman; and formidable Henleigh Mallinger Grandcourt drowns because Eliot is unsure what else to do with him. These men are usually disposed of in credible ways, but are they treated fairly? Are their respective fates convincing given their character flaws and contexts, or are they treated more harshly than the women who share their fictional worlds?

The Gothic Panel II at PAMLA 2019 (Extended)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:55pm
Tanner Sebastian, The University of Nevada, Reno
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

We are looking for one or two more presenters to join the second Gothic Panel at PAMLA.

We invite proposals for papers dealing with Gothic literature, culture, and film. This session welcomes proposals on a wide variety of topics, with particular consideration granted to papers that explore gothic children's literature or that engage with the 2019 conference theme of "Send In the Clowns." Possible foci might include adaptations, audience/reception studies, children's gothic, and emotional portrayals in relation to the Gothic.

Conference Information:

November 14-17, 2019

Wyndham San Diego Bayside, San Diego, CA

Nineteenth-/Twentieth-/Twenty-First-Century Medievalisms

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Daniel C. Najork; Robert Sirabian
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

For this session, we seek proposals exploring the factors shaping nineteenth- and twentieth-/twenty-first-century literature (in its broad sense) about the Middle Ages as well as the differences in approaches to the Middle Ages in each century. What historical, social, and intellectual views shaped nineteenth-century approaches to the Middle Ages? In what ways were these views limited or biased based on what the Victorians knew and believed and did not know, particularly when compared to advances in historical, psychological, and political knowledge in the next centuries? Conversely, what shaped twentieth-/twenty-first-century views of the Middle Ages?

Landlords and Tenants: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Famine Summer School

updated: 
Friday, July 12, 2019 - 11:03am
National Famine Museum at Strokestown Park House, County Roscommon, Ireland
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Irish Famine Summer School, June 11-14th, 2020

"Landlords and Tenants: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly"

National Famine Museum at Strokestown Park House, County Roscommon, Ireland.

The Great Hunger of 1845 to 1852 has cast a long shadow over the subsequent history of Ireland and its diaspora. Since 1995, there has been a renewed interest in studying this event, by scholars, students, archeologists, artists, musicians, folklorists etc.  This interest shows no sign of abating. New research, methodologies and approaches have greatly added to our understanding of the causes, impact and legacies of this tragedy.

Fantasy, Horror, and the Supernatural

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:40am
Kate Watt / PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 19, 2019

From golems to Gollum, ghosts to Ironman, hobbits to succubi, zombies to dopplegangers, the possessed to those who wield the dark arts, the not-human, the almost-human, the was-human, the wants-to-be-human, the beyond-human, and those who use unknown powers to prey on humans have populated human culture and narrative from the beginning. Analysis from any critical perspective, exploring texts drawn from literature, film/TV, graphic novels, manga, comics, visual arts, and elsewhere, is welcome.

Us, Get Out, The Walking Dead, Cthulhu, It, and a wide variety of other texts would be appropriate topics. 

Please submit through the PAMLA.org website directly. 

PAMLA is in San Diego, November 14-17, 2019. 


WORLD WITHOUT END: THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH, WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS, AND THE GLOBAL EXPERIENCE

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:36am
William Gilmore Simms Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

                       

WORLD WITHOUT END: THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH, WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS, AND THE GLOBAL EXPERIENCE

SPONSORED BY

The William Gilmore Simms Society

University of South Carolina

COLUMBIA, S.C.    

SEPTEMBER 18-20, 2020

 

Technology and 19th-C. British Literature

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:35am
Brian Cowlishaw/Northeastern State University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Call for Papers: Subject--Technology and 19th-C. British Literature

 

Seeking contributors for a book of essays that explore connections between technology and nineteenth-century British literature. To be published by McFarland Press, a leading publisher of academic books. (See: https://mcfarlandbooks.com/) Essays should be of interest to, and readable by, both scholars and non-academics.

Suggested topics include:

*The effects of technology on nineteenth-century British literature.

*Portrayals/rhetoric regarding technology in nineteenth-century British literature.

2020 MVSA: Truth, Investigation, & Mystery

updated: 
Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - 6:45pm
Midwest Victorian Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

2020 MVSA Conference

April 24-25—Chicago, Illinois

Gothic Spaces: Houses, Landscapes, Bodies

updated: 
Monday, July 1, 2019 - 4:02am
Samantha Landau
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2019

Gothic Spaces: Houses, Landscapes, Bodies

 

Conference Dates: October 19-20, 2019

Conference Venue: The University of Tokyo, Komaba Campus (Tokyo, Japan)

 

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Dara Downey (Trinity College Dublin)

Ruth Franklin (critic/author)

 

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference Extended Deadline CFP, George Eliot Bicentennial

updated: 
Friday, June 28, 2019 - 9:19am
Victoria Shinbrot, California State University - Sacramento
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS (First-Come, First-Served Extended Deadline Period)

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference

Thursday, November 14, 2019 to Sunday, November 17, 2019, Wyndham San Diego Bayside Hotel, San Diego, California

Conference Theme "Send in the Clowns"

Peacocks, Dragons and Winged Lions: The fantastic bestiary of Oriental art, its circulations & reinventions in Europe (18th-20th c.)

updated: 
Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 10:36am
CNRS / INHA (Paris)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

INHA, PARIS (27-28 MARS 2020)

 

Organising committee:

Vanessa Alayrac-Fielding (université de Lille)

Laurence Chamlou (université de Reims)

Isabelle Gadoin (CNRS, « Thalim » / université de Poitiers)

Invited speaker:

Stacey Pierson (London, SOAS)

 Scientific committee:

Karen Brown (University of St Andrews, Scotland)

Sarga Moussa (Thalim – université Paris Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Nabila Oulebsir (université de Poitiers)

Mildred Galland-Szymkowiak (CNRS, équipe Thalim, UMR 7172)

Evanghelia Stead (université Versailles-St Quentin)

Yusuke Suzumura (Hosei university, Japon)

Victorians Institute Conference 2019: The Nineteenth-Century Gothic

updated: 
Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 9:42am
Indu Ohri / Victorians Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 28, 2019

Seeking paper abstracts for the panel “The Nineteenth-Century Gothic” at the Victorians Institute Conference in Charleston, SC, from October 31-November 2, 2019.

The organizer invites submissions that explore the literary features, historical contexts, theoretical approaches, and adaptations/neo-Victorian incarnations of nineteenth-century ghost stories or Gothic topics. Papers related to the Gothic in the conference’s thematic territories of Charleston, Britain, Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean are especially welcome. Please email your CVs and 250-300-word abstracts to Indu Ohri at io3jc@virginia.edu by Friday, June 28, 2019.

Call for Proposals: 19th Century Prose: Matthew Arnold at 200

updated: 
Wednesday, June 26, 2019 - 1:13pm
Shannon Gilstrap / University of North Georgia / 19th-Century Prose
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

Soliciting proposals and abstracts for a special edition of Nineteenth-Century Prose honoring the bicentennial of Matthew Arnold's birthday, to appear in 2022.  If interested, please send a 250 word abstract/proposal, along with a brief CV (both as attachments in MS Word), to Shannon Gilstrap (Guest Editor) at the University of North Georgia (Shannon.Gilstrap@ung.edu) by 1 August 2019. Proposals for essays in the following areas are needed: Arnold's religious writings;Arnold in/on America (Trans-Atlantic studies);Arnold and cultural studies;Arnold and imperialism;Arnold and the Digital Humanities Of course, other unique essay proposals will be considered. Feel free to visit Nineteenth-Century Prose's website: 

Postgraduate English Journal Issue 39 Call for Submissions (Autumn 2019)

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:23pm
English Department, Durham University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

The Postgraduate English Journal, Durham University’s online peer-reviewed literary journal, is one of the longest-running online postgraduate literary journals in the UK. In recent years the journal has received reprint requests from academic publishers.

Early-career researchers/academics and postgraduates are invited to submit papers of 5,000–7,000 words (or book reviews of no more than 2,000 words) by 30th August 2019 for the journal’s 39th edition. Early submission is greatly encouraged.

 

Art & Action: Literary Authorship, Politics, and Celebrity Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:18pm
The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 29, 2019

Writers and writers’ organisations have a long history of using their public standing and cultural capital to promote causes that transcend the literary sphere, from abolition and gender equality to free expression, anti-war agitation, and environmental issues. This two-day conference explores the intersections of authorship, politics, activism, and literary celebrity across historical periods, literatures, and media. It examines the forms and impact of authorial field migrations between literature and politics and the ways in which they are situated within, and shaped by, structural frameworks that include academic institutions, prize-giving bodies, publishing industries, and literary celebrity culture.

Embodying Romanticism: Romantic Studies Association of Australasia 2019 Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - 3:27am
Romantic Studies Association of Australasia
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 30, 2019

Embodying Romanticism

Romantic Studies Association of Australasia 2019 Conference

21 - 23 November 2019

UNSW Canberra Northcott Drive

Canberra ACT 2600 Australia

 

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

Professor Will Christie, Australian National University

Professor Kevin Gilmartin, California Institute of Technology

Associate Professor Kevis Goodman, University of California Berkeley

Professor Clara Tuite, University of Melbourne

 

 

Call for Papers

"Tales from the Grand Trunk Road" Panel

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 1:45pm
51st Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The oldest highway in Southern Asia was named the Grand Trunk Road by the British in the 17thcentury. During the nineteenth century the route carried not just goods for trade, but also British travelers whose numbers increased on the subcontinent as the century progressed. While the Grand Trunk Road was mentioned in Rudyard Kipling’s novel, Kim, many travelers may not have specifically mentioned it in their accounts, but their journeys would have inevitably taken them through such recognizable places on the route like, Calcutta, Delhi, Lahore, and Kabul. 

NeMLA 2020: New Materialist Readings of 19th-century Writers

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:08am
Dewey W. Hall, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This session engages in a matter-oriented approach, raising questions about the ontological status of the autonomous writing subject by joining it to the vast network of relations to objects within an area—ecozone, bioregion, biome, or ecosystem. Though the contributions by science-based writers are important (e.g., Humphry Davy, Michael Faraday, George Perkins Marsh, John Muir, etc.) New Materialist Interpretations of 19th-century Writers focuses on a different trajectory, accentuating less detectable and unacknowledged contributions to natural history writing offered by literary writers.

Passing on: Property, Family and Death in Narratives of Inheritance

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:54am
Aarhus University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 21, 2019

From Shakespeare’s King Lear to Flaubert’s Frédéric Moreau, who lives off of his uncle’s money, and Edward St Aubyn’s novels about the troubled heir Patrick Melrose, literature has always been occupied with inheritance and inherited wealth. The insights provided by this literary legacy are more important than ever. Once considered a relic from the aristocratic past superseded by liberal meritocracy, inherited wealth is now recognized as a source of rising social inequality. It therefore poses an important challenge for the present – and for the future. To meet this challenge, inheritance must be understood in all its historical and cultural complexity. For inheritance is more than a means of transferring wealth between generations.

Transatlantic Connections: Extended Deadline

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:34am
Victorians Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 1, 2019

The Victorians Institute has extended the deadline for proposals to our 2019 conference:

Transatlantic Connections: Africa, the Caribbean, the Americas, & Victorian Studies will take place Oct 31-Nov 2 in Charleston, SC.

Our conference site affords an opportunity to think about transatlantic connections in the 19th century, when Charleston was a prominent intersection on a web that connected Britain, Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas.

Colonial Knowledges: Environment and Logistics in the Creation of Knowledge in British Colonies from 1750 to 1950

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:17am
Charlotte Coull/Tina Janssen
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 23, 2019

Colonial Knowledges: Environment and Logistics in the Creation of Knowledge in British Colonies from 1750 to 1950.

27th-28th February 2020, University of Manchester.  

Keynote speaker: Professor Javed Majeed, King’s College London.

The effects of colonial power dynamics on knowledge creation in the long nineteenth century and beyond are well known and have become the foundation of a postcolonial reading of British scholarship in the context of empire. What has been less well examined are the practical effects of the colonial context on knowledge making.    

(NeMLA 2020) Charlotte Brontë and the Space of the Self

updated: 
Monday, June 3, 2019 - 3:15pm
Jin Chang Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Jane Eyre calls herself “a wander on the face of this earth.” Excluded from the family in which she is raised and the normative models of female development that should guide her, her state is one of radical orphan-hood. An unwanted, unearthly thing, she must nonetheless find or make a space for herself in this world.

Decorating the Body: Gems, Jewellery, and Body Adornments in Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 3, 2019 - 1:43pm
Anne-Marie Evans, York St John University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 6, 2019

Submissions are invited for this special edition of Lectora exploring the role and representation of jewellery, gems, and other accessories in literature. Focusing on material culture and the novel, the collection will explore how objects designed to enhance the body operate within a range of different literary texts.

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