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The Silence of Dean Maitland: Page, Stage, Screen (critical edition and new essays)

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 11:47am
Syracuse University Dept of English
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

In 1886, Maxwell Gray (pseudonym for Mary Gleed Tuttiett) published The Silence of Dean Maitland. The plot of the scandalous novel concerns a young British clergyman, Cyril Maitland, who, after killing the father of a village woman he has seduced, allows a friend, Henry Everard, to be implicated in the crime. Following a trial, Henry is transported to Australia, where he serves out a twenty year prison sentence, while Cyril ascends the church hierarchy. The Silence of Dean Maitland was a bestseller. It was subsequently adapted for the stage and the screen: the play was a hit; the silent film of 1914 enjoyed considerable success in the U.K. and Australia; and the film of 1934 was something of a blockbuster.

Call for submissions - Lucas Malet, Dissident Pilgrim: Critical Essays

updated: 
Monday, July 25, 2016 - 1:26pm
Palgrave Macmillan
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Call for submissions
Lucas Malet, Dissident Pilgrim: Critical Essays

Popular novelist, female aesthete, Victorian radical and proto-Modernist, Lucas Malet was a literary tour de force in her own day, yet her work has been largely neglected by contemporary readers and critics. A daughter of Charles Kingsley, Malet was part of a creative dynasty from which she drew inspiration but against which she rebelled both in her personal life and her published work. Scholarship by Talia Schaffer and Catherine Delyfer has reopened critical enquiry into the work of this fascinating author, and we are seeking contributions in order to expand this emerging field of study.

Call for Chapters

updated: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 10:28am
Liberating Herself: Emancipationist Writing at the Fin de Siècle (Cambridge Scholars Publishing)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 20, 2016

The second half of the nineteenth century was marked by the emergence of the global women’s movement. Feminist writer Sarah Grand (1854-1943) is considered to be the first to have coined the term “New Woman” in 1894 in England. New Woman writers (in Victorian literature the New Woman novel forms a separate genre) participated in the feminist debate. Feminism altered the course of literature by challenging those literary conventions that governed the portrayal of women and women's experience at the fin de siècle. Feminist texts explicitly advocated social change and discussed new women’s roles in society.

Edinburgh Companion to Literature and Art History (edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 10:32am
Emma Bell
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

This landmark Companion aims to define the academic field of literature and art history. It is the first volume of its kind to comprehensively survey, question, and attempt to organize, interdisciplinary research across these richly inter-related arts. The book is aimed at literature and art history students, as well as at academics and practitioners, who are interested in mapping out intersections between literature, the visual arts, and their respective academic disciplines. The editor is seeking twenty to thirty newly commissioned chapters on any literary or art historical era.

Geographies of Comparison: Ireland / Africa (ACLA 2017, Utrecht, July 6-9, 2017))

updated: 
Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 5:03am
Cóilín Parsons
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

 Ireland was, as Robert Young writes, England’s first and always exceptional colony. But it was far from the only one. Its unique colonial status has yielded productive scholarship addressing its anomalous integration into the colonial world. While this scholarship has resulted in some excellent work on Ireland / India relations and an influential volume on the ‘green and black Atlantic’ that performed a valuable intervention in addressing the African dimensions of the Irish world, both Irish and African literary scholarship have largely neglected affiliations between these literary worlds. The organisers of this panel invite papers that will consider literary and cultural intersections between Ireland and select African nations.

 

A Great Divide or a Longer Nineteenth Century? Music, Britain and the First World War

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:04pm
Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, Durham University UK
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies One-Day Conference
21 January 2017
Durham University, UK
CFP Deadline: 1 September 2016

Conference website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/cncs/conferences/musicbritainww1/

Keynote Address
‘Disruption or Continuity? Elgar’s Cello Concerto and the Modern Romantic Ideal’
Charles Edward McGuire (Oberlin College)

Call for Papers

Multidisciplinary Pedagogies for the 19th Century--Roundtable

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2016 - 8:34am
Nineteenth Century Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Roundtable Discussion on Pedagogies Across Disciplines (addressing 19th century works)

Nineteenth Century Studies Association Meeting, “Memory and Commemoration”

February 2-4, 2017 in Charleston, SC

Victorian Medievalism: Translation and Adaptation

updated: 
Thursday, July 7, 2016 - 10:00am
The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies. May 11-14, 2017. Kalamazoo, Michigan.
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

This session seeks proposals which intend to explore Victorian translations of medieval texts as the transmission of cultural capital and as acts of transformation. More specifically, papers might address some of the following questions: how did Victorians adapt medieval texts to their own ideologies? How were medieval texts adapted into original compositions? How did Victorians approach translation and what does that reveal? How did Victorians think of faithfulness to the text? To the audience? What role did non-British scholars play in translating medieval texts into English (for example, Guðbrandur Vigfússon’s role in George Webbe Dasent’s translations, or Eiríkur Magnússon’s in William Morris’s output and thinking)? 

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