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The Arts in the Periodical Press

updated: 
Friday, August 26, 2016 - 3:00pm
Anna Peak
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 15, 2016

Special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review: “The Arts in the Periodical Press”

In recent years, scholars have increasingly begun to study Victorian music, dance, and architecture for what they can illuminate about literary texts or Victorian culture, and as worthy subjects in their own right. This special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review aims to deepen scholarly understanding of how gender, social class, and other considerations complicated the relation of “the Victorians” to art through a focus on the arts in the periodical press.

VSAWC/VISAWUS 2017: Victorian Education

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:26am
Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada/Victorian Interdisciplinary Studies Association of the Western United States
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 26, 2016

CFP for VSAWC / VISAWUS 2017 Joint Conference: “Victorian Education”

Vancouver, British Columbia

28-29 April 2017 & Publication Workshop 27 & 30 April 2017

 

Masculinity in Women’s Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:12am
Susmita Roye
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel is for NeMLA's annual convention at Baltimore from 23-26 March, 2017.

In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Mr. Bennett can never match the resourcefulness of his wife in her attempts to settle their five daughters in life; Edgar Linton in Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights is a caricature of manliness; in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Wives and Daughters, an only daughter, Molly Gibson, proves to be a better child to her father than a son, Osborne Hamley, who fails his parents; George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss presents Maggie Tulliver as a far stronger, braver and tougher character than her brother Tom.

George Egerton and the fin de siècle

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:22am
Loughborough University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

George Egerton and the fin de siècle

A two-day conference organised by the Modern & Contemporary Research Group at Loughborough University

Keynote speaker:

Professor Margaret D. Stetz (University of Delaware)

Friday 7 – Saturday 8 April 2017

 

NCSA 2017: "Jane Austen & Memory"

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:24am
John Bugg / Fordham University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

JANE AUSTEN & MEMORY

 

The Motto (from Mansfield Park):

       Fanny: “If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient – at others, so bewildered and so weak – and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond controul! – We are to be sure a miracle every way – but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting, do seem peculiarly past finding out.”

The American Romance in 2016

updated: 
Monday, August 15, 2016 - 1:33pm
Society of Early Americanists (SEA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

his panel addresses the American romance in light of recent developments in early American studies. While many Britishists accepted the ascendancy of the anglophone novel, others challenged this teleology, and the transatlantic turn has invited us to consider whether the romance genre survived the New World. The existence of a colonial romance would challenge the “birth” of the American genre in the wake of Scott’s Ivanhoe (1819), and revising that literary history could in turn broaden American romance beyond a hoary pro-slavery ideology. Post-WWII critics arguing for an American romance tradition often cite Hawthorne’s own christening of his novels as “romances” as a key piece of evidence.

REMINDER - RSAA 2017, Transporting Romanticism: Mediation and Mobility

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:29pm
Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 20, 2016

 

RSAA 2017: Transporting Romanticism: Mediation and Mobility
16-18 February 2017
Wellington, New Zealand
Co-hosted by Massey University and Victoria University of Wellington

Proposals due: 20 August 2016

North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 4:00pm
North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 31, 2016

North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies

 

North Wind, the journal devoted to the works of George MacDonald, is seeking articles for its 2016 edition.  Articles are welcome on all aspects of MacDonald: his fairy tales, fantasies, novels, poetry, and sermons.  The journal is also seeking shorter “notes and queries” and “connections” that focus on issues related to MacDonald.

 

Fashioning the Unconventional Victorian: Conduct, Costume, Coiffure

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:39pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017/Baltimore
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Despite a rich scholarship on Victorian dress culture, the idiosyncratic in Victorian costume often remains marginal in the criticism. This panel examines how fashion – original, unusual, peculiar, or even outlandish – preoccupied the Victorian cultural imagination. Papers might investigate eccentric fashion’s role in specific genres; its portrayal in the Victorian periodic press, advertising, or conduct manuals; the bachelor girl’s or the dandy’s nonconformity in attire; dress as gender or status markers; how costume determines, camouflages, or liberates; the fin-de-siècle aesthete’s couture; ways the outré became a normatively modish for the middle-class Victorian consumer.

Acting Age in the Long Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
NEMLA 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Recent work in performance studies have trenchantly analyzed constructs of identity, gender, and race in the Long Eighteenth Century. In Rival Queens, for example, Felicity Nussbaum explores how actresses of the eighteenth century embodied and challenged femininity through their roles on and off the stage, roles that blended together in the mind of a public audience. But enlightening performance studies such as Nussbaum's do not often, however, account for age. Age cuts across gender, race, and class.

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