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world literatures and indigenous studies

NEMLA 2021: Forgotten Women: Violence, Gender, and Sexuality in South Asia

updated: 
Monday, June 29, 2020 - 9:32am
Nidhi Shrivastava
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

Since 2017, the #metoo movement has been successful for the conviction of Harvey Weinstein, who was at the center of the landmark trial. The same cannot be said in the case of India, which is still coming to terms with the issue of gender-based violence. Our panel will examine the representations of women who have been forgotten or have been rendered invisible in the national and international media discourse. Our panel will examine such representations through the study of South Asian filmic and theatre representations of Dalit (lower-caste), Northeast Indian, and women who were foundational figures in the defining the newly minted nation—India and Pakistan.

The Ethics of Narrative: Appropriation and Reinvention in Stories of Injustice (NeMLA 2021)

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2020 - 1:31pm
NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This CFP is for a seminar session at the 2021 NeMLA Convention.

Literature and film that bear witness to injustice can create space for voices that have been silenced. They can lead to the recognition of people subjected to human rights violations and produce shared national and transnational identities. They can draw readers’ attention back onto the politics and power of reading audiences. 

NeMLA 2021: Imagination and the Body in 20th-century Literature

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2020 - 1:39pm
NeMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In the Arcades Project, Benjamin wrote that it is from the gates of the imagination that lovers and friends draw their energies. Over the past few decades, scholarship has been ever more inclined to treat the imagination not as false or unreal, but as an embodied, affective, and fluid mode of creating meaning and experiencing the world. The concept of bodily imaginaries in queer and feminist studies, for instance, seeks to overcome the strict duality between imagination and the body: as Maggie Nelson points out in The Argonauts, “in the field of gender, there is no charting where the external and the internal begin and end.”

NEMLA 2021: Plague Writing: Rethinking the Canon

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2020 - 10:41am
Josh Dawson SUNY Buffalo
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The sudden arrival of COVID-19 and its profound impact on nearly all aspects of daily life for people across the globe will undoubtedly produce a substantive re-examination of the canon of ‘plague writing’ that has, historically, been dominated by European voices. While the predominant influence of European authors in the genre of plague writing can, to a certain extent, be explained historically by the Black Death being the most deadly pandemic in human history, more recent and more global pandemics provide the opportunity to re-examine the situation of these canonical texts and to consider the stakes of plague writing on a broader international stage.

Polish Literature as World Literature (Edited Collection)

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2020 - 1:25pm
Piotr Florczyk
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

Polish Literature as World Literature (Edited Collection)

Deadline: October 1, 2020

Contact:
Piotr Florczyk (University of Southern California)
K. A. Wisniewski (American Antiquarian Society)

Description

Decolonising Science Fiction

updated: 
Sunday, June 28, 2020 - 6:00pm
Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 4, 2021

In the wake of the worldwide protests after the killing of George Floyd, and the toppling of statues implicated in the legacy of the slave trade, we propose a special issue of Foundation on the topic of ‘decolonising science fiction’. As John Rieder and others have argued, the emergence of sf as a genre is embedded in colonial discourses of the late nineteenth century. The pursuit of new frontiers in outer space, within the Earth or under the oceans not only mirrored ‘the scramble for Africa’ but was also informed by the racialist and pseudo-scientific ideologies of the period. In more recent years, authors such as N.K. Jemisin, Jeannette Ng and Tade Thompson have sought to confront sf with the racist legacy of its origins.

SAMLA 92 is Going Virtual (A Conference Update)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2020 - 10:41am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 3, 2020

Important Update: The 92nd annual conference of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association will take place November 13-15, 2020 as an entirely online event hosted through Accelevents

Because we are moving our conferene to an online format for 2020, we have revised several crucial deadlines for conference planning. They are as follows:

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