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world literatures and indigenous studies

LITERATURE OF EMIGRATION FROM THE ARABIAN GULF

updated: 
Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 6:41am
MLA 2019 International Symposium,Lisbon, Portugal,23-25 July 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 20, 2018

Since the discovery of oil in the 1970s, Gulf Cooperation Countries (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, and Oman) have employed a large expatriate labor force, primarily from neighboring South Asian Countries of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Philippines. Recent studies claim that nearly 50.4% of the total population of the Gulf Cooperation Countries are expatriates. Such mass emigration has not only allowed for the rapid economic expansion of these Gulf countries, but at the same time they have produced a number of cultural and socio-economic consequences for the countries from where Gulf’s primary work forces originate.

World & Comparative Literature in an Anti-Humanities Age

updated: 
Monday, July 9, 2018 - 11:54am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Is World Literature the new, upgraded version of Comparative Literature (Comp Lit 2.0) or rather an attenuated, impoverished version of the latter? What unites us, and what divides us, especially considering that many World Lit faculty are drawn from Comp Lit backgrounds?  How do we, practitioners in these fields, rethink these disciplines for the era when humanities as such are under constant attack? In this session, we hope to discuss our shared ground and our shared challenges.  This roundtable is organized by the NeMLA World Literature Working Group as a yearly forum for discussing theoretical and historical issues, pedagogy and curriculum, and new directions in the field of World  Literature.

US as Global Colonizer: Reflections from Post-postcolonial Pakistani Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 9, 2018 - 11:41am
Syeda Sughra Naqvi, Université de La Rochelle, France/ NeMLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This session will explore the rationale of Post-postcolonial revisionism introduced by the US as global colonizer from Post-postcolonial Pakistani Literature while focusing on the post 9/11 social misrepresentations. There are four aspects which highlight the theme of the session (US as Global Colonizer): 1) US hegemony in the form of Revisionism, through social misrepresentations and exploitation 2) The recursivity of nuclear power and American domination that alludes to the evolving “great game” in Afghanistan 3) Welfare of Imperialism: American influence on Paksitan’s internal policies and minority rights in Pakistan, and 4) The relationship between US (neocolonizer) and Pakistan (colonized) in the aftermath of 9/11.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Literary Dialogue with Chinua Achebe

updated: 
Monday, July 9, 2018 - 11:37am
Thomas Jay Lynn / Pennsylvania State University Berks
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is among the most prominent and admired young writers of African Europhone fiction. As a Nigerian and Igbo author, she has been linked with one of her renowned predecessors, Chinua Achebe. Indeed Achebe himself paid tribute to Adichie's talent, observing that "Adichie came almost fully made." Clearly one of the influences that shaped that talent has been Achebe's own fiction. Adichie's novels and shorter fiction allude to and draw on elements of Achebe's work, and this panel will explore dimensions of storytelling, history, politics, gender, and culture that create a complex and rich dialogue between the two authors.

Made for Translation: Literature and Globalization

updated: 
Monday, July 9, 2018 - 11:06am
Victoria Livingstone (NEMLA panel)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

How does the anticipation of translation shape texts in their original languages? In this panel, participants will analyze literary works that seem to be written with translation and the global publishing market in mind or those that reject a globalized style of writing. Papers may analyze texts from any region, but must address translation in some way.

Go to NEMLA's site for more information. Abstracts must be submitted via NEMLA's site. Panel number 17650.

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