world literatures and indigenous studies

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CFC CURRENTS NO. 6: NEW TRENDS IN ENGLISH STUDIES FOR THE 2020s

updated: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 10:13am
CURRENTS: A Journal of Young English Philology Thought and Review
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

 

CURRENTS NO. 6

NEW TRENDS IN ENGLISH STUDIES FOR THE 2020s

 

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the sixth issue of CURRENTS: A Journal of Young English Philology Thought and Review. CURRENTS is an open access, peer-reviewed, yearly interdisciplinary journal, based in Toruń (Nicolaus Copernicus University), addressed to young researchers in the field of English studies.

CFP_OMNES: The Journal of Multicultural Society, 11(1)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 13, 2020 - 11:19am
Research Institute of Asian Women
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

We are currently accepting manuscripts for OMNES: The Journal of Multicultural Society Vol.11 No.1 that will be published on January 31, 2021. To be considered for the upcoming issue, OMNES 11(1), please submit your manuscript by October 30, 2020.

 

About the Journal

(Extended Deadline: October 19, 2020) Still Greek to Us: Greek Myth and 21st-century Literature (NeMLA 2021)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 3:32pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 19, 2020

Stories from ancient Greek myths dot the literary landscape of the early 21st century. To some extent, this has been the result of deliberate planning, as when Canongate began publishing a series of mythological retellings by well-known authors in 2005. But alongside and independent of such coordinated efforts to keep old tales alive for contemporary audiences, offerings from both established authors (David Malouf, Barry Unsworth, Colm Toibin, Pat Barker) and successful newcomers (Madeline Miller, Daisy Johnson) have likewise retold and reimagined mythical narratives in recent years.

Epistemic Justice in Literary Studies (ACLA Panel)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:11pm
Victoria Zurita and Chen Bar-Itzhak, Stanford University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

This panel addresses epistemic inequality in literary studies: the categories, theories and methods through which we read and conceptualize literature are still determined at the center of global academic production, while peripheral epistemologies often do not circulate beyond national borders and therefore do not take part in the shaping of the discipline.

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Jorge Luis Borges

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:11pm
José Eduardo González/University of Nebraska
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Proposals are invited for a volume in the MLA's Approaches to Teaching World Literature series entitled Approaches to Teaching the Works of Jorge Luis Borges.

Essays in this volume could address teaching Borges's work by focusing on topics such as philosophy, religion, mythology, detective fiction, gender relations/gender conflict, politics, the fantastic, history, popular literature, film and other arts, translation. Borges’ works are taught in so many different courses and contexts (Modern Languages, English, History, Philosophy, Religion) that we welcome essays teaching Borges in non-traditional settings or to non-literature students. Contributors are also invited to propose essays on topics not mentioned above.

Postcolonial Hauntologies (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:02pm
ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

What sorts of specters haunt the postcolonial realm? How can we conceive of hauntologies that enable us to effectively listen to postcolonial specters? Derrida defines hauntology as a way in which we can learn to acknowledge those things about us or around us that we have forgotten how to notice. He emphasizes that by acknowledging specters, hauntology performs a gesture of “positive conjuration” in which specters are raised to be listened to and not in order to be exorcised. Acting as a disruption to western notions of space and time, specters function as transformative mediums of postcolonial recovery by making space for the co-existence of the past within the present and acknowledging the existence of alternative histories.

Poverty: Interpreting the World’s Dividing Line

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:53pm
GIRES-Global Institute for Research Education & Scholarship
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

Poverty: Interpreting the World’s Dividing Line
International Conference

(Due to the high number of proposals we added one more day-Sunday, 25 Oct.)

Thematic Approach

Visualizing Translation (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:44pm
Matthew Liberti and Kristin Dickinson, University of Michigan
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association) Conference, April 8-11, 2021, virtual event

Matthew Liberti and Kristin Dickinson, University of Michigan (co-orgaizers)

Increasingly, scholarship has begun to address the significance of translation for a variety of fields, including architecture, geography, museum -, memory -, and gender studies. In this seminar we aim to investigate the particular intersection of visual studies and translation studies, and to explore non-linguistic or non-traditional modes of translation. 

We invite papers from a variety of historical and literary-cultural backgrounds that take up the following questions:

[ACLA CPF] Reverse: Impure Mediascapes and Epistemic Resistance

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:37pm
American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

What do media and technologies mean for the colonized, racialized, and dehumanized? How do we interpret, use, or embody them in ways that go against the grain of colonial logic? How do we rewrite our histories decolonially by taking a close look at their materiality, representation, aesthetic form, and ontological structures? This seminar looks for media and technologies that reverse modern/colonial agencies and explore resistant subjectivity. We think of Leanne Simpson’s keen perception on the maps of “two-dimensional representations”: one is the colonial map that represents the colonial reality; another is the map that records alternative realities of pain, loss, and survival “alongside” the colonial one, embodied by the Nishnaabeg elders.

Religions' Special Issue on the Contributions and Challenges of Latinx Global Pentecostalism

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:36pm
Religions
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

From early in its inception, the Pentecostal religious movement has been an integral part of Latinx spirituality. In the Latin American/Caribbean experience, religion has played a vital role, beginning with its indigenous roots, the Spanish colonial legacy, African-based religions brought to the New World, the introduction of U.S. Protestantism in the nineteenth century, and the arrival of Pentecostalism. Historically, Latinx Pentecostalism developed as a global phenomenon. Despite its wide and enduring impact on religious life in the Americas and beyond, the literature on Pentecostalism still has significant research gaps especially in the following areas: ethnographic studies, comparative approaches, and methodological considerations.

Borders in the South Asian Graphic Novel

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:26pm
ACLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

The graphic novel’s openness to auto/biographical and historical content and its explicit demotic allegiances enable it to perform a range of political-affective stances including subversion, resistance, solidarity, memorialization, loss, complicity, capitulation, defiant interiority, and cautious hope. Graphic novels are therefore emerging as a powerful tool for mapping the uncertain and liminal spaces that complicate the neat divisions and borders that map out national/sexual/ethnic/religious/caste/personal identities in South Asia. This seminar seeks to address how graphic novels negotiate these borders and boundaries as they imagine the histories--both private and public, personal and collective--of South Asia.

CFP: Cultures of Sexuality (Deadline: Dec 1, 2020)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:07pm
Sanglap: Journal of Literary and Cultural Inquiry (7.1)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Since the sexual abuse allegations against American film producer Harvey Weinstein in Oct 2017, the #metoo movement has received wide attention on social media and in public life. What this movement has reminded us is sexual abuse is deeply implicated in social/hierarchical power structures (forcing survivors to suffer violence and then hide trauma). It has also offered the possibility of speaking against sexual abuse, harassment, and violence in public and “shaming” perpetrators (as “due process” has often been painful, slow, and unfair). The movement has led to public debates on questions of patriarchy, power, nepotism, culture, clothing, ethics, and ideology.

ACLA 2021 panel -Digital Cosmopolitanism: The Home as the World

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 11:57am
Anhiti Patnaik, Juan Evaristo Valls-Boix
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 25, 2020

This seminar invites papers that interrogate the terms under which contemporary interactions between the 'Self' and the 'Other' take place on digital platforms. It deconstructs the binary of the ‘home’ and the ‘world’ and the 'First World' and 'Third World' by analyzing new cultural mobilities and power structures of globalized, outsourced, and work-from-home economies. Can technology produce reciprocal tolerance between different nations and cultures without the need for physical travel? Can it create de-territorialized spaces of desire, friendship, and xenophilia within the very borders of the ‘home’? Does it merely afford an illusion of cohesion and digital cosmopolitanism?

Now due 10/19: Intersectional, Innovative, Digital: Whither the New Humanities? (Now virtual - NeMLA 2021)

updated: 
Saturday, October 10, 2020 - 11:21am
Sabina Lenae, New York University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 19, 2020

The idea that studying the humanities generates more empathy and compassion is one that is now commonly understood. However, the humanities have been at a crossroads for these past ten odd years, since the rise of the digital humanities as “the next big thing” (Panapacker, 2009). Staunch advocates of the traditional humanities would look back and defend the discipline's ongoing relevance from its inception. Although there has been much-needed innovation in the humanities in recent years, partly in response to greater funding and public fervor for so-called “STEM” fields, it has not been without controversy.

Discourses of Asian American Literature and Studies Then and Now (NeMLA 2021 panel)

updated: 
Friday, October 9, 2020 - 2:11pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 19, 2020

Since the coinage of the term “Asian American” in the late 1960s, the fields of Asian American literature and Asian American studies have since then grown remarkably. Now in recent decades, more and more widespread interdisciplinary connections are made between Asian American fields and other disciplines, such as history, religion, media, and cultural studies. As Asian American fields continue to evolve and create new discourses of understanding and new approaches of interpretation, long-standing traditions should not be forgotten, for they play a major role in shaping the future of Asian American literature and studies.

(ONLINE) MIGRATION, ADAPTATION AND MEMORY - 3rd International Interdisciplinary Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 - 2:07am
InMind Support
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

5-6 November 2020 - ONLINE

Organizers / Scientific Committee:

InMind Support (Poland)

 

Professor Wojciech Owczarski - University of Gdańsk (Poland)

Professor Polina Golovátina-Mora - Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana (Colombia)

 

CFP: Migration, Adaptation and Memory 

3rd Singapore Literature Conference

updated: 
Saturday, October 3, 2020 - 10:46pm
Poetry Festival Singapore
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

The 3rd Singapore Literature Conference is slated to take place on August 7, 2021, a Saturday. The theme of the symposium is “Community." We are interested in papers that explore the theme in poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction and drama about Singapore and Southeast Asia from a wide range of perspectives and disciplines.

Living in the End Times: Utopian and Dystopian Representations of Pandemics in Fiction, Film and Culture: A Virtual Interdisciplinary Conference hosted by Cappadocia University, Turkey, January 13 – 15, 2021

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:59am
Cappadocia University, Turkey
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 6, 2020

Living in the End Times: Utopian and Dystopian Representations of Pandemics in Fiction, Film and Culture

A Virtual Interdisciplinary Conference hosted by Cappadocia University, Turkey, January 13 – 15, 2021 

Venue: Cappadocia University, Mustafapaşa Campus, 50420 Ürgüp/Nevşehir/Turkey (Virtual-Microsoft Teams)

Keynote speakers: Larissa Lai, Maggie Gee, Kim Stanley Robinson, Tom Moylan, Raffaella Baccolini, and Elizabeth Outka

Description:

The Construction of Place in Canadian Literature and Drama (ACLA, virtual)

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:40am
Meredith Malburne-Wade and Alysia Davis/ACLA (virtual)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Inspired by the (intended) original location for the 2021 ACLA conference (Montreal), we are soliciting papers on the role of place in Canadian literature and drama for this year's online conference. 

Stories from the Margins: Indigenous Connections to the Land

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:40am
Francesca Mussi/ University of Northumbria
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 11, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Stories from the Margins: Indigenous Connections to the Land

 

University of Northumbria 29-30 June 2021

 

 

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

 

  • Prof. Lill Tove Fredriksen (UiT The Arctic University of Norway)
  • Conversation between Prof. David Stirrup (University of Kent, U.K.) and Anishinaabe, Métis and settler-Irish artist Elizabeth LaPensee

 

Life Writing as World Literature

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:37am
ACLA April 8-11, 2021 (Virtual)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 30, 2020

 

Life Writing as World Literature, ACLA April 8-11, 2021 (Virtual)

This panel brings the fields of world literature and life writing together to explore social, economic and ideological contexts informing the circulation, translation and reading of auto/biographical texts. Redefinitions of world literature highlight the “effective life” of works “within a literary system beyond that of its original culture” (Damrosch 2003) or underscore that literature now “is unmistakably a planetary system” (Moretti 2000).

British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference

updated: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020 - 8:39am
British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

OUR 30TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD VIRTUALLY, FROM FEBRUARY 15, 2021 to FEBRUARY 19, 2021.

The British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies Conference, inaugurated in 1992 — the oldest and longest-running annual meeting of its kind in the United States — will hold its first virtual conference, and calls for presentations situated in colonial and postcolonial histories, literatures, creative and performing arts, politics, economics, and all other aspects of the countries formerly colonized by Britain and other European powers.

The Postcolonial Bildungsroman

updated: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 1:48pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Originally an 18th-century German innovation, the bildungsroman became a popular literary genre across the Anglo-American world during the 19th century. A ‘coming of age’ novel about young adults in search of meaning, the genre was the literary medium of choice for many Western writers exploring the moral and psychological developments of characters traversing unfamiliar worlds and encountering new challenges and adventures.

World Literature and the Minor: Figuration, Circulation, Translation (online conference)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 1:43pm
University of Leuven
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 15, 2020

World Literature and the Minor: Figuration, Circulation, Translation

 

6 – 7 May 2021

University of Leuven, Belgium (online)

 

Keynote Speakers:

Michael Cronin (Trinity College Dublin)

B. Venkat Mani (UW-Madison)

Francesca Orsini (SOAS)

Lyndsey Stonebridge (Birmingham)

 

Narrating Violence and Environments in Latin America (NeMLA 2021 Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 8:33pm
Kevin Ennis / Brown University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 11, 2020

In After Nature: A Politics for the Anthropocene (2015), Jedediah Purdy describes what he calls the "environmental imagination," which comprises “how we see and how we learn to see, how we suppose the world works, how we suppose that it matters, and what we feel we have at stake in it. It is an implicit, everyday metaphysics, the bold speculations buried in our ordinary lives” (6-7). Amidst the gravity of the Anthropocene today, Purdy examines the linkages between environmental imagination and “ways of acting, personally, politically, and legally, that have shaped the world in concrete ways” (7).

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