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world literatures and indigenous studies

A Love Letter to "This Bridge Called My Back"

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 10:00am
Amelia M. Kraehe
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

A LOVE LETTER TO THIS BRIDGE CALLED MY BACK

Call for Chapter Proposals

Book Overview

The Settings of Margaret Atwood

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 9:33am
Louisa MacKay Demerjian
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Margaret Atwood is a world-renowned Canadian writer. Her identity as a Canadian is important to her and is reflected in her work, especially her earlier work. However, she is a well-travelled person as well and her works don't all take place in Canada. Over the years, she has set her work in urban, suburban and rural locations around Canada but also in the Caribbean and, in The Handmaid's Tale, in the Boston area. This panel would look at Atwood's various settings. How does she use place to reflect or cause either the comfort or the alienation of her characters? Why did she choose to set her first dystopian novel in Cambridge rather than in her home city of Toronto?

South Asian Literatures in the World

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 10:15am
South Asian Review
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

CFP: South Asian Literatures in the World

South Asian Review

Guest Editor: Dr. Madhurima Chakraborty 

South Asian Review invites 5000-word essays for a Special Issue on South Asian Literatures in the World. 

We invite work that thinks about the international relationships, global contexts, and other national, regional, and collective identities that help generate and give meaning to South Asian culture. 

Different Voices, Voicing Difference (NEMLA 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 10:33am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The question of the relation of language to voice traces back to Aristotle’s De interpretatione, with its definition of speech as the sign of thought, and writing the sign of speech. In Jacques Derrida’s account of this phonologocentric model, voice is the ligature of “phōnē and logos,” securing their essential proximity. But if voice is only a mediation, then, as Barbara Johnson writes, voice is no longer “self-identity but self-difference.” Paradoxically, the voice marks the singular but is itself plural, sweeping the self up into an ever-ramifying play of differentiation. As David Lawton proposes, “voice is both a signature, ‘I,’ singularity, and a clear marker of difference, ‘not I,’ multiplicity”.

Postcolonial Satires

updated: 
Monday, June 17, 2019 - 12:11pm
Amy L. Friedman / NeMLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The Empire definitely wrote back, often with defiance, mockery, and wit.

As Bill Ashcroft summarizes of postcolonial criticism, “this was a new way of reading those literatures that emphasized their transformative power as well as their difference.”

I am seeking papers on satirical material, in all media, which engage with postcolonial issues.

Tacky/Wacky: The Corny as an Aesthetic Category

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:20pm
Mathieu Perrot
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

“What I liked were: absurd paintings, pictures over doorways, stage sets, carnival backdrops, billboards, bright-colored prints, old-fashioned literature, church Latin, erotic books full of misspellings, the kind of novels our grandmothers read, fairy tales, little children’s books, old operas, silly old songs, the naïve rhythms of country rimes,” Arthur Rimbaud, The Alchemy of the Word (1873).

 

NeMLA: French Religious Spaces, Rhetoric, and Identity: 1534-1790

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:39pm
Janée Allsman, University of Colorado Boulder
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 51st Annual Convention, March 5-8, 2020

Boston, Massachusetts
Marriott Copley Place

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

 

French Religious Spaces, Rhetoric, and Identity: 1534-1790

 

How did religious spaces and their regulation in France between 1534 and 1790 shape religious rhetoric and identities? How did the legacies or privation of these spaces inform or define the identities of French missionaries in the colonies, or of French-speaking religious communities in exile? What was the relationship between private and public spaces and religious identities?

Suggested topics may include:

Call for Papers [Volume: 07, Issue: 03]

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 3:46pm
International Journal of English Language & Translation Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

We are currently soliciting unpublished, quality research articles/case studies in the fields of ELT, Linguistics, Literature, Discourse and Translation Studies for Volume: 07, Issue: 03 [July-September, 2019 Issue] of IJ-ELTS.  

The papers can address issues in/related to the following research disciplines-

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