world literatures and indigenous studies

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Stranger Forms: Translating the Unusual and Minor of Early Modernity (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 11:38am
Laura Francis and Sara Stamatiades - Cornell University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

While canonical works like Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra’s Don Quixote have enjoyed rich histories of translation, minor texts rarely see as much activity. Even for famous authors, unusual forms may not see the light of day at all. Take Cervantes’ own entremeses, for example: a kind of theatrical interlude prevalent in Golden Age Spain, these short texts have attracted only a handful of translations compared to the Quixote’s hundreds. Carrying out the author’s own biting remark that he wrote dramatic pieces never to be dramatized, the lack of translation only reinforces the already problematic centering of canonical texts. Unavailability across languages ingrains the marginal status of other works and, with them, the marginal figures they represent.

ACLA Seminar: Geographies of Racial Capitalism: Labor, Caste, Dispossession

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 - 12:20pm
Co-organizers: Najnin Islam (Colorado College), Neelofer Qadir (UNC, Greensboro)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

We understand racial capitalism as a global phenomenon hinged on long, connected histories of dispossession and labor across geographies and temporalities. Cedric Robinson’s pioneering Black Marxism emphasizes the tendency for capitalism “not to homogenize but to differentiate–to exaggerate regional, subcultural, and dialectical differences into racial ones.” Investigating how capital draws upon differences within Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean attunes us to otherwise obscured dynamics. What histories, archives, literatures, and methods expand the vocabulary for racial capitalism to account for the specificities of diverse contexts?

New Poetry Pedagogies (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 - 11:57am
Caroline Gelmi and Lizzy LeRud/ACLA Online, April 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Recent poetry scholarship has begun to trace how some of the most normative concepts in poetry studies (meter, free verse, lyric, the speaker, voice) are enmeshed within broader systems of white supremacy and imperialism. Yet these concepts often go unchallenged in college classrooms. This seminar asks, how might this scholarship change the way we teach poetry and poetics--in any language, at any level, from Introduction to Poetry to advanced graduate seminars?

Global Flânerie in the Twenty-First Century: The Failures and Successes of Urban Walking from 2000-2021

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 12:38pm
Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

What are the major challenges to twenty-first-century flânerie?

Consider the effects of:

•          the Coronavirus pandemic (lockdowns, empty streets, social distancing, masked flâneurs/flâneuses);

•          the impediments to or dangers of urban strolling as a result of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion, citizenship (and protesting such limitations as in the case of the Black Lives Matter and other social justice movements); 

•          the difficulties posed by environmental degradation in cities (air pollution, waste management and global waste trading, congestion and overcrowding); 

Movements and Moments: On Dub Poetry

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 10:03am
Phanuel Antwi, University of British Columbia
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 15, 2021

CFP: Essays for The Journal of West Indian Literature November 2021 Special Issue, “Movements and Moments: On Dub Poetry”

ACLA seminar: South Asian Disasters in 20th and 21st Century Literature, Film, and Culture

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 10:03am
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

South Asian Disasters in 20th and 21st Century Literature, Film, and Culture: 

a seminar at the American Comparative Literature Association meeting on April 8-11, 2021.

Co-organized by Liam O'Loughlin (Capital University) and Pallavi Rastogi (Louisiana State University)

ACLA 2021 Virtual Conference: The Ends of Travel

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 10:03am
Kyle Richert Kamaiopili, Utah Valley University, and Seohyon Jung, Seoul National University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

This panel examines travel and emplacement in response to crises. Interruptions to normative modes of travel in the ongoing wake of COVID-19 reveal fault-lines in the ways such norms are understood--how travel bans and exclusionary rhetoric extend national borders inward and outward, from the targeting of racialized international students, to the upheaval of the global passport rankings, to travel advisories crossing settler-state and tribal boundaries. Recent approaches to travel writing, mobility, and place studies have emphasized dwelling, emplacement, and urban exploration as a way of engaging with the seeming shifts in discussion towards travel within rather than across space.

Special Latin American Issue

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 2:41am
Journal of Foreign Languages and Cultures
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 30, 2021

Call for Papers
Special Latin American Issue of Journal of Foreign Languages and Cultures

Guest Editor: João Cezar de Castro Rocha (Full Professor of Comparative Literature at State University of Rio de Janeiro—UERJ)

Deadline extended for 'The Gendered Subaltern and the Urban Theatre Space'

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 2:00am
Dr Shuchi Sharma
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 30, 2020

Deadline Extended for Call for Book Chapters for Edited Volume

‘The Gendered Subaltern and the Urban Theatre Space’

 

deadline for submissions: 

30 November, 2020

full name / name of organization: 

Dr Shuchi Sharma

contact email: 

shuchi.sharma@ipu.ac.in

Research articles are being invited for a peer reviewed edited book to be published by a reputed publisher tentatively in early 2021.   

The Gendered Subaltern and the Urban Theatre Space

 

Final Call for chapters for an edited book, Refrigerated Culture and Pluralism: A Literary Perspective

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 1:44am
Khan & kochar
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Vernon Press has shown interest in the proposed book. 

Kind attention: We seek representations of minority and refrigerated cultures from Europe, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand, as we have received ample representations from other parts of the world.

“No Culture can live if it attempts to be exclusive.” - Mahatma Gandhi

Writing the Pandemic: Perspectives on Pandemic Literature

updated: 
Saturday, October 17, 2020 - 10:05am
Dr Rakhi Vyas, Department of English, Jai Narain Vyas University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 7, 2020

Call for Papers

Writing the Pandemonium: Perspectives on Pandemic Literature

 

 

Proposals for an edited book/ anthology of chapters on Pandemic Literature i.e. novels, poetry, short fiction pertaining to Pandemic Literature.

 

The Contemporary Essay: How Do We Read Them and Who Are They For?

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 11:15am
American Comparative Literature Association 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

The esteemed American Comparative Literature Association’s 2021 Annual Meeting is now fully virtual and will take place April 8-11, 2021. Please find details below about an exciting opportunity to submit a proposal to get involved with the conversation about the ‘contemporary essay’ at the ACLA 2021 virtual conference. 

Panel Title: The Contemporary Essay: How Do We Read Them and Who Are They For?

CFP Art, Disease, and Expression - Issue 31, FORUM Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts, 30 November 2020

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 11:15am
FORUM Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts, University of Edinburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 30, 2020

FORUM Postgraduate Journal Call for Papers 

Issue 31 (2020): Art, Disease, and Expression

Science and art are the very nature of human attempts to understand and describe the world around us. As COVID-19 continues to dominate public discourse across the world - its ongoing effects trickling into every facet of our lives - the relationship between our health and how it affects the way we move through society has never felt more prescient. The 31st issue of FORUM aims to explore what has been identified as ‘sickness’ in literature and art through the years. How have the body and mind been treated by writers, artists, and cultural commentators - in sickness and in health.

Science Fiction in India: Parallel Worlds and Postcolonial Paradigms

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 10:52am
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 13, 2020

Call for Papers

Edited Anthology to be published by Bloomsbury

Science Fiction in India: Parallel Worlds and Postcolonial Paradigms

 

Journal of Foreign Languages and Cultures

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 10:50am
Hunan Normal University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

Published annually in June and December, Journal of Foreign Languages and Cultures is seeking essays in critical theory, literature, culture, and translation theory. The submissions deadline is October 15 for the December issue, and April 15 for the June issue. The journal's website is: http://jflc.hunnu.edu.cn/. Submissions should use MLA style and be approximately 4,000-7,000 words. Inquiries are welcome to co-editor Lauri Scheyer at Lramey@calstatela.edu.

The Ethics of Narrative: Appropriation and Reinvention in Stories of Injustice (NeMLA 2021) -- Extended Deadline

updated: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 7:55pm
NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 19, 2020

This CFP is for a seminar session at the 2021 NeMLA Convention. The deadline has been extended to October 19.

Literature and film that bear witness to injustice can create space for voices that have been silenced. They can lead to the recognition of people subjected to human rights violations and produce shared national and transnational identities. They can draw readers’ attention back onto the politics and power of reading audiences. 

New Deadline: Anglophone Literature, Anglo-American Institutions (NeMLA 2021 Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 10:30pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 19, 2020

How have British and American institutions shaped Anglophone literatures across the 20th and into the 21st centuries? In the decades accompanying decolonization, London and New York remain literary capitals by dint of their concentration of literary capital: the infrastructure of publishers and periodicals, agencies and awards that—staffed by professional readers—support (and distort) the creative act. Centers of cultural gravity, they continue to set standards and bestow prestige, offering more reliable access to readers and remuneration, acting on the materials of writers and manuscripts drawn from around the world.

CFC CURRENTS NO. 6: NEW TRENDS IN ENGLISH STUDIES FOR THE 2020s

updated: 
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 10:13am
CURRENTS: A Journal of Young English Philology Thought and Review
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

 

CURRENTS NO. 6

NEW TRENDS IN ENGLISH STUDIES FOR THE 2020s

 

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the sixth issue of CURRENTS: A Journal of Young English Philology Thought and Review. CURRENTS is an open access, peer-reviewed, yearly interdisciplinary journal, based in Toruń (Nicolaus Copernicus University), addressed to young researchers in the field of English studies.

CFP_OMNES: The Journal of Multicultural Society, 11(1)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 13, 2020 - 11:19am
Research Institute of Asian Women
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

We are currently accepting manuscripts for OMNES: The Journal of Multicultural Society Vol.11 No.1 that will be published on January 31, 2021. To be considered for the upcoming issue, OMNES 11(1), please submit your manuscript by October 30, 2020.

 

About the Journal

(Extended Deadline: October 19, 2020) Still Greek to Us: Greek Myth and 21st-century Literature (NeMLA 2021)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 3:32pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 19, 2020

Stories from ancient Greek myths dot the literary landscape of the early 21st century. To some extent, this has been the result of deliberate planning, as when Canongate began publishing a series of mythological retellings by well-known authors in 2005. But alongside and independent of such coordinated efforts to keep old tales alive for contemporary audiences, offerings from both established authors (David Malouf, Barry Unsworth, Colm Toibin, Pat Barker) and successful newcomers (Madeline Miller, Daisy Johnson) have likewise retold and reimagined mythical narratives in recent years.

Epistemic Justice in Literary Studies (ACLA Panel)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:11pm
Victoria Zurita and Chen Bar-Itzhak, Stanford University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

This panel addresses epistemic inequality in literary studies: the categories, theories and methods through which we read and conceptualize literature are still determined at the center of global academic production, while peripheral epistemologies often do not circulate beyond national borders and therefore do not take part in the shaping of the discipline.

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Jorge Luis Borges

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:11pm
José Eduardo González/University of Nebraska
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Proposals are invited for a volume in the MLA's Approaches to Teaching World Literature series entitled Approaches to Teaching the Works of Jorge Luis Borges.

Essays in this volume could address teaching Borges's work by focusing on topics such as philosophy, religion, mythology, detective fiction, gender relations/gender conflict, politics, the fantastic, history, popular literature, film and other arts, translation. Borges’ works are taught in so many different courses and contexts (Modern Languages, English, History, Philosophy, Religion) that we welcome essays teaching Borges in non-traditional settings or to non-literature students. Contributors are also invited to propose essays on topics not mentioned above.

Postcolonial Hauntologies (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 2:02pm
ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

What sorts of specters haunt the postcolonial realm? How can we conceive of hauntologies that enable us to effectively listen to postcolonial specters? Derrida defines hauntology as a way in which we can learn to acknowledge those things about us or around us that we have forgotten how to notice. He emphasizes that by acknowledging specters, hauntology performs a gesture of “positive conjuration” in which specters are raised to be listened to and not in order to be exorcised. Acting as a disruption to western notions of space and time, specters function as transformative mediums of postcolonial recovery by making space for the co-existence of the past within the present and acknowledging the existence of alternative histories.

Poverty: Interpreting the World’s Dividing Line

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:53pm
GIRES-Global Institute for Research Education & Scholarship
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

Poverty: Interpreting the World’s Dividing Line
International Conference

(Due to the high number of proposals we added one more day-Sunday, 25 Oct.)

Thematic Approach

Visualizing Translation (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:44pm
Matthew Liberti and Kristin Dickinson, University of Michigan
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association) Conference, April 8-11, 2021, virtual event

Matthew Liberti and Kristin Dickinson, University of Michigan (co-orgaizers)

Increasingly, scholarship has begun to address the significance of translation for a variety of fields, including architecture, geography, museum -, memory -, and gender studies. In this seminar we aim to investigate the particular intersection of visual studies and translation studies, and to explore non-linguistic or non-traditional modes of translation. 

We invite papers from a variety of historical and literary-cultural backgrounds that take up the following questions:

[ACLA CPF] Reverse: Impure Mediascapes and Epistemic Resistance

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:37pm
American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

What do media and technologies mean for the colonized, racialized, and dehumanized? How do we interpret, use, or embody them in ways that go against the grain of colonial logic? How do we rewrite our histories decolonially by taking a close look at their materiality, representation, aesthetic form, and ontological structures? This seminar looks for media and technologies that reverse modern/colonial agencies and explore resistant subjectivity. We think of Leanne Simpson’s keen perception on the maps of “two-dimensional representations”: one is the colonial map that represents the colonial reality; another is the map that records alternative realities of pain, loss, and survival “alongside” the colonial one, embodied by the Nishnaabeg elders.

Religions' Special Issue on the Contributions and Challenges of Latinx Global Pentecostalism

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:36pm
Religions
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

From early in its inception, the Pentecostal religious movement has been an integral part of Latinx spirituality. In the Latin American/Caribbean experience, religion has played a vital role, beginning with its indigenous roots, the Spanish colonial legacy, African-based religions brought to the New World, the introduction of U.S. Protestantism in the nineteenth century, and the arrival of Pentecostalism. Historically, Latinx Pentecostalism developed as a global phenomenon. Despite its wide and enduring impact on religious life in the Americas and beyond, the literature on Pentecostalism still has significant research gaps especially in the following areas: ethnographic studies, comparative approaches, and methodological considerations.

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