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world literatures and indigenous studies

Victorians Institute Conference 2019: The Nineteenth-Century Gothic

updated: 
Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 9:42am
Indu Ohri / Victorians Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 28, 2019

Seeking paper abstracts for the panel “The Nineteenth-Century Gothic” at the Victorians Institute Conference in Charleston, SC, from October 31-November 2, 2019.

The organizer invites submissions that explore the literary features, historical contexts, theoretical approaches, and adaptations/neo-Victorian incarnations of nineteenth-century ghost stories or Gothic topics. Papers related to the Gothic in the conference’s thematic territories of Charleston, Britain, Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean are especially welcome. Please email your CVs and 250-300-word abstracts to Indu Ohri at io3jc@virginia.edu by Friday, June 28, 2019.

Somatexts: Tattoos as Technology, Bodies as Text

updated: 
Friday, August 2, 2019 - 4:04pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 51st Annual Convention (Boston, MA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Whereas most people employ more temporary “sign vehicles” (Goffman 1959) such as haircuts, make-up, and clothing as forms of signification that can be revised in relation to cultural shifts, the relative permanence of tattoos as a technology of body modification complicates the mobility needed by tattooed bodies to negotiate their significatory space, even as such tattoos have the potential to “speak” multiple meanings across various modes of non-verbal transmission, or become the impetus for queer or non-normative kinship.

Flows & Floods: Changing Environments and Cultures

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:09am
Nora Castle, Amul Gyawali, Harry Pitt Scott | English & Comparative Literary Studies, University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Flows & Floods:
Changing Environments and Cultures

22nd February, 2020|University of Warwick 

Keynote Address: Profs. Dominic Boyer and Cymene Howe (Rice University)

NEMLA 2020: Forgiveness in the 21st Century: Postcolonial Perspectives

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:10am
Saumya Lal
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

 

Panel: Forgiveness in the 21st Century: Postcolonial Perspectives

(NEMLA 2020, March 5-8, Boston)

In today’s world, where political narratives of apologies and amnesties proliferate, understanding the nature of forgiveness has become increasingly significant. The arguable success of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission – with its ideological investment in forgiveness, as affirmed by Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s No Future without Forgiveness – has impelled the world to engage seriously with the ethical possibilities of forgiveness. Yet, questions about the vexed relationship between forgiveness, responsibility, and justice remain unresolved. 

Decolonizing the Victorians

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 6:03pm
School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 25, 2019

Decolonizing the Victorians 

School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon

October 14, 2019

Org. University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies (ULICES-CEAUL), in collaboration with the Centre for Indian Studies

 

Keynote speakers:

Jyotsna Singh, Professor of Renaissance Literature, Michigan State University, USA

Neilesh Bose, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in History, University of Victoria, Canada

 

Representations of Irishness in the 21st Century: Boundaries Between Past & Present

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:31am
PAMLA - Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

AbstractThis panel explores representations of Irishness in the 21st Century. From the Belfast Agreement and the “end” of the Northern Ireland Troubles to the Republic’s referenda on divorce, abortion, and marriage equality, the past 25 years present a dynamic and changing society on the island. Recalling Clare Connolly’s introduction to Ireland and Postcolonial Theory, in which she writes of instability of the “boundaries between past and present [...] memory and history, national and international,” this panel examines Irishness in relation to shifting global, political, and cultural contexts as they manifest in texts from the present and recent past in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, 35 Years Later

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 9:54am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The Handmaid's Tale was originally published in 1985 and was critically acclaimed. It is a novel that has consistently been considered one of Margaret Atwood's best. However, though it was made into a movie in 1990, The Handmaid's Tale has never been more prominent and recognized than it has been since the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Russian & American Short Stories & Influence, updated; Abstract: 7/8/2019; Completed Draft: 12/1/2019

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 9:54am
Jeff Birkenstein
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 8, 2019

CFP: Russian & American Short Stories & Influence, updated

Abstract: 7/8/2019; Completed Draft: 12/1/2019


UPDATE: Below follows our original CFP, which we now update slightly and with urgency. We have thus far assembled an excellent collection of promised essays, but are now looking specifically for essays that meet the requirements below as well as1) are about Russian authors OTHER than Chekhov (as you can imagine, we quickly got our share of those) and 2) about American authors who are of color and/or women. Please read on and submit your idea(s) to us. We are excited to hear from you.

 

Chinua Achebe's No Longer at Ease at 60 (for Northeast Modern Language Association 5-8 March 2020)

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:39am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

As Chinua Achebe's second novel, No Longer at Ease, first published in 1960, arrives at its 60th anniversary, scholars have an opportunity to reassess its significance not only for African literature, but also for world literature in general. The story is set in the 1950's and richly depicts the cultural tensions of African societies nearing independence from Great Britain. It forecasts both the optimism and the disappointment that would characterize post-independence Africa. In dramatizing the fortunes of the Okonkwo family in rural Nigeria and Lagos, No Longer at Ease forms a sequel to Achebe's first and most famous novel, Things Fall Apart (1958), but is not as widely read and discussed as its predecessor.

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