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ACLA 2017: Poetry After Europe: Geopolitical Poetics in the 21st Century

updated: 
Monday, July 25, 2016 - 1:23pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Poetry After Europe: Geopolitical Poetics in the 21st Century [or does the subtitle dilute the force of “Poetry After Europe?”]

 

Organizers:

  • Walt Hunter (Clemson University)
  • Shirley Lau Wong (Westfield State University)

 

Pocahontas and after: historical culture and transatlantic encounters, 1617-2017

updated: 
Monday, July 25, 2016 - 1:21pm
British Library - Institute for Historical Research, London
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 13, 2016

Pocahontas and after: historical culture and transatlantic encounters, 1617-2017

The British Library and the Institute for Historical Research, London

March 16-18, 2017

 

A major international conference to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Pocahontas’ death.  Co-hosted by the Eccles Centre for American Studies at the British Library and the Institute for Historical Research.

 

Additional support has been provided by the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture and The University of Warwick.

 

PAMLA Conference Pasadena, 11/11-13/16: Extended CFP Deadlne 8/5 or ASAP

updated: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 10:32am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 5, 2016

Approximately thirty sessions for the November 11-13, 2016 Pasadena, California PAMLA Conference are still in need of a paper or two. To propose to one of these open sessions (see a partial list below) go here: http://www.pamla.org/2016/topic-areas . These open sessions will be open until August 5, or the session fills, whichever comes first.

Erich Auerbach's "Mimesis": The View from the 21st Century

updated: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 10:25am
Richard Schumaker Northeaset Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Erich Auerbach’s "Mimesis"—The Representation of Reality in Western Literature—was published in 1945 and had a tremendous influence in the middle part of the 20th century. Using a method of textual analysis to establish continuities from Homer to Virginia Woolf, Auerbach has been read by virtually every serious student of literature for seventy years now. Because of the scope and density of the book it is somewhat difficult to ready examine and evaluate Mimesis. This panel will examine Mimesis from two angles. First, we will study and reflect the overarching themes of this magisterial book. Second, we will look at his individual textual analyses to probe their validity and relevance in 2016.

Heidegger and the Western Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

 

Heidegger and the Western Literary Tradition.

This panel will investigate the complex relationships between the work of Martin Heidegger and Western literature from the Greeks until the 20th century. Three distinct questions or areas of investigation will be treated: 

• How did Heidegger use a specific writer in one or more of his philosophical writings?  
• How does Heidegger’s use of a given writer relate to our current understanding of the works and themes of this writer?
• Are there thematic points of contact between Heidegger’s work and literary authors that Heidegger may not have mentioned? Can we point out specific limitations that might result from Heidegger’s philosophical methodology?

Nietzsche and the Literature of the 19th Century

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

In his lifetime, Nietzsche referred to over 150 nineteenth-century writers in both his published writings and Nachlaß. Nietzsche’s use of nineteenth-century fiction and poetry ranges from somewhat nonchalant to extremely systematic. Indeed, the cornerstone of his “Advent of European Nihilism” in the late 1880s is the decline or decadence of literature during Nietzsche’s lifetime.

The panel attempts to focus on passages, individual novels or poems, and complete bodies of work in order to assess Nietzsche’s use of these texts in his philosophical project.

Revisiting the Great War: From Text to Context

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

World War I marked one of the great turning points in the political, social, and cultural history of Europe and the world.  This panel explores the lived, daily experience of this war by looking at five different forms. Presenters can address these forms in isolation or show the relationships between them. 

First, presenters may analyze and evaluate the experience of the Great War through its literary texts, diaries, or journals. Presenters are encouraged to choose a single passage or two in order to explore the concrete experience of the war. The texts may focus on soldiers, civilians or both. Any text—on the fronts or at home—are suitable for this panel. 

Berlin in Film and Fiction: From the Cold War to German Reunification

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Since 1945, Berlin has become a cultural Weltstadt in many ways; this panel would like to focus on three of them. First, the contemporary situation of Berlin in reunified Germany serves as a lens for the flow of people, ideas, rinfluences between Europe and the rest of the world. Second, from 1945-1989, most of the tensions of the Cold War converged in Berlin. Third, for both of these reasons, today a large number of films, novels, and TV programs are set in Berlin, thus making it a privileged place of cultural representation. The purpose of this panel is to study all three of these situations from an international and comparative point of view.

Albert Camus, Our Contemporary?

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

The present literary reputation of Albert Camus is both fascinating and instructive. It is fascinating because, on the one hand, his work is all but absent from global university curricula; yet, he is one of the most widely read authors on the planet. Who has not read The Stranger or The Myth of Sisyphus?

Moreover, Camus and his work are instructive for many reasons.

Novels of the Holocaust: Fundamental Pedagogical Issues

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

 

The aim of this roundtable is to present possible guidelines and book selections for a hypothetical undergraduate course in “Novels of the Holocaust.” The panel will be resolutely international and open to books originally published in any language. As this roundtable is sponsored by NeMLA’s comparative literature director, participants are not obliged to use or refer to English translations if they wish to use original texts. The course that might be called the “target course” may be for any undergraduate level and for any country.

While this is roundtable is meant to follow the interests of its participants and not impose any institutional rigidities, seven particular themes or questions seem especially important.

MFS Special Issue - Inter-imperiality

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:05pm
Modern Fiction Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Inter-imperiality
Guest Editor: Laura Doyle
Deadline for Submissions: 1 June 2017

The editors of MFS seek essays that engage with the concept of inter-imperiality, as developed in the recent PMLA “Theories and Methodologies” cluster (March 2015) and elsewhere. The global turn in literary and cultural studies, although productive, sometimes elides the post/colonial, economic, and other historical or geopolitical conditions of literary-cultural production. We solicit essays that offset this tendency by reading literary-cultural texts within an inter-imperial framework.

Publish your paper in Nova Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 2:58pm
Nova Explore Publications
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Manuscripts of original scientific researches, reviews, short communications and Case reports, E-books and Thesis from researchers are invited for submission to   support@novaexplore.com for publishing in Nova Explore journals, an open access peer-review publications in Canada. 

Nova Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (NJHSS) is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes original research articles as well as review articles in several areas of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies. The journal’s Editorial Board is divided into the 55 subject areas related to Humanities and Social Sciences. 

Lifewriting Annual - Call for Book Reviews

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 2:56pm
Rob Ward (Brown University)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Lifewriting Annual: Biographical and Autobiographical Studies (AMS Press) seeks reviews of recent publications, including autobiographies, memoirs, letters, and so on. Word length: 1000-1500 words. Citation style: Chicago, 16th edition (author/date). Deadline for submission: December 1st, 2016. Expected publication of volume 6: 2017. Please get in touch with short proposals and questions. 

Revisiting Ghare Baire

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2016 - 9:50am
Gillian Dooley
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

 

Call for Papers: Proposed Edited Book

 

Revisiting Ghare Baire

 

Edited by Md Rezaul Haque (Islamic University, Bangladesh) and Gillian Dooley

(Flinders University, South Australia)

 

Pages