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UPDATE: American Romance Writers (7/1/06; dictionary)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Pregis_at_aol.com

Deadline extended:

Call for Contributors: Dictionary of Literary Biography
AMERICAN ROMANCE WRITERS

Draft deadline July 1, 2006

Contributors are needed to write an objective, clear, comprehensive account
of the life, career, and literary reputation of the romance writers listed
below.

Mary Jo Putney
Kathleen Winsor

Those interested in contributing please e-mail the editor of the volume:
Pamela Regis, Professor of English
McDaniel College
2 College Hill
Westminster, MD 21157
pregis_at_mcdaniel.edu

UPDATE: American Romance Writers (7/1/06; dictionary)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Pregis_at_aol.com

Deadline extended:

Call for Contributors: Dictionary of Literary Biography
AMERICAN ROMANCE WRITERS

Draft deadline July 1, 2006

Contributors are needed to write an objective, clear, comprehensive account
of the life, career, and literary reputation of the romance writers listed
below.

Mary Jo Putney
Kathleen Winsor

Those interested in contributing please e-mail the editor of the volume:
Pamela Regis, Professor of English
McDaniel College
2 College Hill
Westminster, MD 21157
pregis_at_mcdaniel.edu

CFP: Exploring Early Modern Regions (3/15/06; collection)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Emily S. Smith

"Every region neere": Explorations in gendered, generic, historical, and
geographic regions, 1500-1700

I have recently been contacted by Cambridge Scholars Press about possibly
editing a volume on early modern approaches to region, and I am interested in
soliciting abstracts for contributions that consider gendered, generic, or
geographic regions in early modern texts.

CFP: Exploring Early Modern Regions (3/15/06; collection)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Emily S. Smith

"Every region neere": Explorations in gendered, generic, historical, and
geographic regions, 1500-1700

I have recently been contacted by Cambridge Scholars Press about possibly
editing a volume on early modern approaches to region, and I am interested in
soliciting abstracts for contributions that consider gendered, generic, or
geographic regions in early modern texts.

CFP: Exploring Early Modern Regions (3/15/06; collection)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Emily S. Smith

"Every region neere": Explorations in gendered, generic, historical, and
geographic regions, 1500-1700

I have recently been contacted by Cambridge Scholars Press about possibly
editing a volume on early modern approaches to region, and I am interested in
soliciting abstracts for contributions that consider gendered, generic, or
geographic regions in early modern texts.

CFP: Zadie Smith (4/14/06; collection)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Tracey Walters

Submissions are invited for a collection of essays analyzing the novels =
and short stories of black British author Zadie Smith. The main focus of =
the collection will be to explore the various ways Smith approaches =
issues of race, identity, and post colonialism.=20

Suggested topics for discussion include:

Black British/British identity in a global community

Exploring Biracial identity in a British context

Interracial relationships

The utopian view of "race mixing"

A comparative view of post colonialism: immigrant vs. British born =
children

Cultural alienation and displacement

CFP: Zadie Smith (4/14/06; collection)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Tracey Walters

Submissions are invited for a collection of essays analyzing the novels =
and short stories of black British author Zadie Smith. The main focus of =
the collection will be to explore the various ways Smith approaches =
issues of race, identity, and post colonialism.=20

Suggested topics for discussion include:

Black British/British identity in a global community

Exploring Biracial identity in a British context

Interracial relationships

The utopian view of "race mixing"

A comparative view of post colonialism: immigrant vs. British born =
children

Cultural alienation and displacement

CFP: Zadie Smith (4/14/06; collection)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:45pm
Tracey Walters

Submissions are invited for a collection of essays analyzing the novels =
and short stories of black British author Zadie Smith. The main focus of =
the collection will be to explore the various ways Smith approaches =
issues of race, identity, and post colonialism.=20

Suggested topics for discussion include:

Black British/British identity in a global community

Exploring Biracial identity in a British context

Interracial relationships

The utopian view of "race mixing"

A comparative view of post colonialism: immigrant vs. British born =
children

Cultural alienation and displacement

CFP: The Political Norman Mailer (including grad) (4/15/06; 10/12/06-10/14/06)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:44pm
Lennon, Michael

CALL FOR PAPER ABSTRACTS--THE 4TH NORMAN MAILER SOCIETY CONFERENCE, 2006
=20
The Programming Committee is looking for good proposals for panel =
presentations during the fourth annual conference of The Norman Mailer =
Society, to be held in Provincetown, MA, October 12-14, 2006. The =
theme of this year's conference is "The Political Norman Mailer," but =
papers on other topics related to Mailer and his work are also welcome. =
Please follow the guidelines below carefully.
=20
Send a 50-75 word biographical statement and a 300-400 word abstract of =
the proposed paper--as MS Word attachments only--not in the body of your =
email--by April 15 to the program committee chair: Robert Begiebing, =

CFP: The Political Norman Mailer (including grad) (4/15/06; 10/12/06-10/14/06)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:44pm
Lennon, Michael

CALL FOR PAPER ABSTRACTS--THE 4TH NORMAN MAILER SOCIETY CONFERENCE, 2006
=20
The Programming Committee is looking for good proposals for panel =
presentations during the fourth annual conference of The Norman Mailer =
Society, to be held in Provincetown, MA, October 12-14, 2006. The =
theme of this year's conference is "The Political Norman Mailer," but =
papers on other topics related to Mailer and his work are also welcome. =
Please follow the guidelines below carefully.
=20
Send a 50-75 word biographical statement and a 300-400 word abstract of =
the proposed paper--as MS Word attachments only--not in the body of your =
email--by April 15 to the program committee chair: Robert Begiebing, =

CFP: Scottish Crime Fiction, CLUES: A Journal of Detection (10/31/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:44pm
Elizabeth Foxwell

> CFP: Scottish crime fiction, spec issue of _CLUES: A Journal of Detection_
> Guest Editor: Gill Plain, University of St. Andrews (UK)
>
> From Ian Rankin to Val McDermid to Alexander McCall Smith, Scottish writers have dominated the British crime fiction market for the past twenty years. The Scottish crime fiction issue of _CLUES_ (the only US academic journal on mystery fiction) seeks to examine this phenomenon. Is the success of Scottish crime fiction attributable to a literary history stretching back to the nineteenth century and beyond, or is it the result of more recent cultural and political developments?

CFP: British Screens Now (UK) (3/31/06; 9/11/06-9/13/06)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:44pm
Andrew Moor

This is the first cfp for 'British Screens Now', an international conference to be held at
Manchester Metropolitan University and Cornerhouse Cinema Manchester, UK.

Deadline for abstracts: 31st March 2006.

'British Screens Now' will address, in the broadest sense, screen media produced and consumed in
Britain. Bringing together practitioners and scholars, it will look forward and backwards in an
attempt to promote an understanding of what appears on British screens, how it gets there and how it
is consumed. The conference will also encourage a sustained reassessment of what actually
constitutes 'British screens' in increasingly global contexts.

Major strands of the conference will be:

CFP: British Screens Now (UK) (3/31/06; 9/11/06-9/13/06)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:44pm
Andrew Moor

This is the first cfp for 'British Screens Now', an international conference to be held at
Manchester Metropolitan University and Cornerhouse Cinema Manchester, UK.

Deadline for abstracts: 31st March 2006.

'British Screens Now' will address, in the broadest sense, screen media produced and consumed in
Britain. Bringing together practitioners and scholars, it will look forward and backwards in an
attempt to promote an understanding of what appears on British screens, how it gets there and how it
is consumed. The conference will also encourage a sustained reassessment of what actually
constitutes 'British screens' in increasingly global contexts.

Major strands of the conference will be:

CFP: Scottish Crime Fiction, CLUES: A Journal of Detection (10/31/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:44pm
Elizabeth Foxwell

> CFP: Scottish crime fiction, spec issue of _CLUES: A Journal of Detection_
> Guest Editor: Gill Plain, University of St. Andrews (UK)
>
> From Ian Rankin to Val McDermid to Alexander McCall Smith, Scottish writers have dominated the British crime fiction market for the past twenty years. The Scottish crime fiction issue of _CLUES_ (the only US academic journal on mystery fiction) seeks to examine this phenomenon. Is the success of Scottish crime fiction attributable to a literary history stretching back to the nineteenth century and beyond, or is it the result of more recent cultural and political developments?

CFP: Scottish Crime Fiction, CLUES: A Journal of Detection (10/31/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Monday, January 30, 2006 - 10:44pm
Elizabeth Foxwell

> CFP: Scottish crime fiction, spec issue of _CLUES: A Journal of Detection_
> Guest Editor: Gill Plain, University of St. Andrews (UK)
>
> From Ian Rankin to Val McDermid to Alexander McCall Smith, Scottish writers have dominated the British crime fiction market for the past twenty years. The Scottish crime fiction issue of _CLUES_ (the only US academic journal on mystery fiction) seeks to examine this phenomenon. Is the success of Scottish crime fiction attributable to a literary history stretching back to the nineteenth century and beyond, or is it the result of more recent cultural and political developments?

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